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Emergency WASH Biweekly Update, August 15, 2019

Dear Colleagues:

Below are recent Emergency WASH-related studies, reports and blog posts. We received a suggestion to include more general WASH-related research in the biweekly updates and CKM does distribute a Weekly WASH Research Update, August 12, 2019 so just let me know if you would like to subscribe to the weekly research updates.

WEBINARS

Water as a Tool for Resilience in Times of Crisis – Water security professionals discussed the latest thinking about water’s impact on fragile regions in a recent panel discussion. The panel included Basil Mahayni of the USAID-funded Sustainable Water Partnership; Cynthia Brady, formerly of USAID; David De Armey of Water for Good, an international NGO; Abigail Jones of USAID; and Erika Weinthal of Duke University.

REPORTS eehh

How to design handwashing facilities that change behavior. Wash’Em, August 2019. There are several reasons why handwashing facilities can have an important effect on behavior.

Emergency Environmental Health Forum 2019 report and presentations, August 2019. This event report covers the 9th Emergency Environmental Health Forum which was held on 17-18 June 2019 in Geneva, Switzerland. The theme of the conference was ‘Disease Outbreaks and Their Control’.

Guidance on market based programming for humanitarian WASH practitioners. Global WASH Cluster, 2019. How market based programming can complement and improve WASH programming; How to conduct a WASH market assessment

Ensuring Access to Water in Kenya. USAID, 2019. In Kenya’s Arid and Semi-Arid Lands, recurrent drought makes access to water—for humans, agriculture, and livestock—an ongoing challenge. To address these challenges, USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) partner World Vision constructs automated water kiosks—or “Water ATMs”—with technical support from private pump solutions company Grundfos.

Early response and resilience investments: the case of drought in eastern Ethiopia in 2015–16. ODI, July 2019. The study, detailed in this report, considers three key questions: To what degree did delivering aid early help prevent loss of productive assets, indebtedness and other distress strategies? How far had investments in building resilience helped people to cope better with crisis? Was the flexibility of longer-term programs effective in ensuring the delivery of earlier assistance?

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Responding to epidemics in large-scale humanitarian crises: a case study of the cholera response in Yemen, 2016–2018. BMJ Global Health, June 2019. Despite endemicity and conflict, Yemen was not prepared for the epidemic. To contain outbreaks, conflict-affected states, humanitarian agencies, and donors must emphasise preparedness planning and community-directed responses.

Unimproved water sources and open defecation are associated with active trachoma in children in internally displaced persons camps in the Darfur States of Sudan. Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, July 2019. Trachoma is found at low levels in these camps, but still at levels where intervention is needed. Disease elimination in conflict-related settings presents a unique challenge for the trachoma community, and may require an innovative approach.

Broad approaches to cholera control in Asia: Water, sanitation and handwashing. Vaccine, 2 August 2019. Interim solutions including household level water treatment, constructing latrines and handwashing promotion have only marginally reduced the risk of cholera and other fecally transmitted diseases. Increased research to develop and policy flexibility to implement a new generation of solutions that are designed specifically to address the physical, financial and political constraints of low-income communities offers the best prospect for reducing the burden of cholera across Asia.

BLOG POSTS

17 Countries, Home to One-Quarter of the World’s Population, Face Extremely High Water Stress. WRI, August 6, 2019. New data from WRI’s Aqueduct tools reveal that 17 countries – home to one-quarter of the world’s population—face “extremely high” levels of baseline water stress, where irrigated agriculture, industries and municipalities withdraw more than 80% of their available supply on average every year.

Erika Weinthal on the Weaponization of Water in Conflict Settings. New Security Beat, August 2, 2019. Weinthal’s research focuses on the role water plays in active and protracted conflicts, specifically the consequences of targeting water systems and weaponizing water during war.

Preparing for the Inevitable: Monitoring Drought and Other Natural Disasters with GADAS. Agrilinks, July 2019. GADAS is a free, web-based desktop GIS platform that provides users with access to a vast array of high temporal, real-time data streams from various climate and weather sources including the Pacific Disaster Center, satellite imagery and remotely-sensed political, irrigation and water, elevation and much more data that enables users to quickly assess and monitor conditions on the ground, highlight regional risk posed by natural disasters and spatially model potential disaster impacts.

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Arsenic detected in rainwater harvesting tanks in Bolivia

This is a guest blog by Riley Mulhern, a PhD student at the University of North Carolina. If you are interested in issues related to water quality monitoring, you can join our online community here.   In areas of water scarcity around the globe, made worse by climate change and pollution of groundwater, rainwater harvesting remains … Continue reading Arsenic detected in rainwater harvesting tanks in Bolivia

IMG_1467

ruralwaternetwork

WASH Training Events and Resources (updated August 15, 2019)

Please let us know of other organizations and training resources to add.

WASH Training and Educational Events and Resources (updated August 15, 2019)

Sources to check

  • CAWST
  • Coursera MOOC
  • International Water Association (IWA)
  • International Water Centre 
  • IRC
  • Mzuzu University (Malawi)
  • UNC Water Institute
  • UNDP Cap-Net
  • UNESCO-IHE (Delft)
  • WEDC
  • Globalwaters.orgtraining courses and resources.
  • Others???

CENTRE FOR AFFORDABLE WATER AND SANITATION TECHNOLOGY (CAWST)

  • Training Workshops – Delivered by CAWST and its local training partners. Designed for WASH managers, government staff, field workers and community workers.

COURSERA ONLINE COURSES

IRC

WASH Systems Academy – A dynamic online platform to assist WASH sector professionals in applying a WASH systems strengthening approach. Interactive, engaging and free—the WASH Systems Academy makes driving for change for this human right fun and available to all. Listen to podcasts, watch animations, connect with others in the forums, create your own materials and much more! Watch this video to see what the academy has to offer:

  •  WASH systems strengthening – From 16th September to 27th September 2019 the free basic course ‘WASH systems strengthening: the basics’ will be available on the WASH Systems Academy. The basic course takes on average 16 hours and is to be completed in 2 weeks. At the end of the course, you will understand the WASH systems strengthening approach. The course contains the key concepts of the approach and has cases and examples where the approach is used. This course is also available in October 2019 and November 2019.

International Water Association (IWA)

International Water Centre – We were founded in 2005 with the vision of harnessing the diverse expertise of the world’s leading water professionals, to educate and empower individuals, communities and organizations, to build capacity to respond to water challenges in innovative ways. Some of its online courses include:

  • Introduction to WASH for development, starts September 16, 2019 – This online course will provide those starting their career or preparing for project work in the WASH sector with the fundamental principles and approaches to better engage and support efforts to work towards achieving SDG6. Cost: $548.00

  • Water reform and governance, starts August 20, 2020 – In this online course, we will explore these questions and draw on practical examples to demonstrate how water reform processes are successful when they are context driven, inclusive of direct – and indirect users of water, take a whole-of-water-cycle approach to reform, and deeply consider multiple societal outcomes. Cost: $648.00

Mzuzu University (Malawi) The Mzuzu University Centre of Excellence in Water and Sanitation participates in research, water quality and fecal sludge analysis, training, consultancies, outreach programs, and the practical application of research findings. Successful participants will receive a certificate of attendance/recognition. For registration please contact mzuniwatsan@gmail.com

  • Geographic Information System (GIS) introduction | 5 to 9 August 2019 (5 full days) | Fee per participant is MK250,000.
  • Environmental Impact Assessments in Malawi | 12 to 16 August 2019 (5 full days) | Fee per participant is MK250,000.
  • Low-cost sanitation | 13 to 15 August 2019 (3 full days) | Fee per participant is MK150,000. 
  • Monitoring, evaluation and learning | 27 to 30 August 2019 (4 full days) | Fee per participant is MK200,000.
  • Constructing safe and sustainable groundwater wells | 29 and 30 August 2019 (2 full days)| Fee per participant is MK100,000.
  • Outcome mapping: Building learning and reflection into development programs | 2 to 6 September 2019 (5 full days)  Fee per participant is MK250,000.

UNC Water Institute

  • Water Safety Plans: An Online Distance Learning Program –  The Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) is offering a 9-week online learning course on Water Safety Plans (WSPs) aimed at those in the water industry with management, engineering, or operational responsibilities. Throughout the course, key content is presented through problem-solving scenarios and case study examples. A series of nine modules synthesizes cumulative up-to-date knowledge and illustrates experiences gained in real-world WSPs.

UNDP Cap-Net Virtual Campus – The Virtual Campus is an innovative platform to support water capacity development.

  • Water Integrity: Principles and Concepts, 2019 Edition – This online instructor-led course is meant to offer a “grain” of the needed knowledge required by water practitioners, public officials, NGO personnel, and anybody else who want to contribute to increase the efficiency and integrity of water management.  This course will take place between September 30 and November 29, 2019. Interested participants may apply online until September 7. There is no course fee. Sponsored by a partnership of international development organizations, the course is free.

  • An Introduction to WASH Climate Resilience Programming – This course aims to provide an introduction on how to effectively implement WASH climate resilience programming. The course will ultimately build the capacity of WASH sector professionals to improve existing programmes, making them more sustainable and climate-resilient. A certificate will be provided on completion of the course. There is no course fee. Sponsored by a partnership of international development organizations, the course is free. Interested participants must apply for this course before Wednesday, October 10, 2018.

  • Solar Powered Water Systems: An Overview of Principles and Practice – This online instructor-led course aims to address common misconceptions regarding SPWS, raise awareness and increase utilization of existing standards and reference materials, and ultimately improve sustainability and impact of SPWS. This course will take place between September 16 and November 3, 2019. Interested participants may apply online until August 16. Course language is English.There is no course fee. Sponsorship for the course is provided by a partnership of international development organisations.

WEDC

  • Online courses in Water Management for Development – Some of the core modules are on: Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services; Management of Village Water Services; Water and the Natural Environment; Research Methods; Management and Operation of Water Utilities; Urban Sanitation Management

UNESCO-IHE (Delft) – https://www.un-ihe.org/short-courses

  • Short courses are meant for professionals – or groups of professionals – with a specific area of interest and a limited amount of time. The focus and content of short courses vary from specialised and technical matters to challenges and approaches in management. Didactical methods used in these short courses include lectures, individual or group exercises in the classroom, behind the computer, or in the laboratory.

 

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WASH Training Events and Resources (updated August 15, 2019)

We have made a quick start on compiling a listing of WASH training events and resources. Please let us know of other organizations, courses and links to add. gender_1

WASH Training Events and Resources (updated August 15, 2019)

Sources to check

COURSERA ONLINE COURSES

IRC

WASH Systems Academy – A dynamic online platform to assist WASH sector professionals in applying a WASH systems strengthening approach. Interactive, engaging and free—the WASH Systems Academy makes driving for change for this human right fun and available to all. Listen to podcasts, watch animations, connect with others in the forums, create your own materials and much more! Watch this video to see what the academy has to offer:

  •  WASH systems strengthening – From 16th September to 27th September 2019 the free basic course ‘WASH systems strengthening: the basics’ will be available on the WASH Systems Academy. The basic course takes on average 16 hours and is to be completed in 2 weeks. At the end of the course, you will understand the WASH systems strengthening approach. The course contains the key concepts of the approach and has cases and examples where the approach is used. This course is also available in October 2019 and November 2019.

International Water Centre – We were founded in 2005 with the vision of harnessing the diverse expertise of the world’s leading water professionals, to educate and empower individuals, communities and organizations, to build capacity to respond to water challenges in innovative ways. Some of its online courses include:

  • Introduction to WASH for development, starts September 16, 2019 – This online course will provide those starting their career or preparing for project work in the WASH sector with the fundamental principles and approaches to better engage and support efforts to work towards achieving SDG6. Cost: $548.00
  • Water reform and governance, starts August 20, 2020 – In this online course, we will explore these questions and draw on practical examples to demonstrate how water reform processes are successful when they are context driven, inclusive of direct and indirect users of water, take a whole-of-water-cycle approach to reform, and deeply consider multiple societal outcomes. Cost: $648.00

UNC Water Institute

  • Water Safety Plans: An Online Distance Learning Program –  The Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) is offering a 9-week online learning course on Water Safety Plans (WSPs) aimed at those in the water industry with management, engineering, or operational responsibilities. Throughout the course, key content is presented through problem-solving scenarios and case study examples. A series of nine modules synthesizes cumulative up-to-date knowledge and illustrates experiences gained in real-world WSPs.

UNDP Cap-Net Virtual Campus – The Virtual Campus is an innovative platform to support water capacity development.

  • Water Integrity: Principles and Concepts, 2019 Edition – This online instructor-led course is meant to offer a “grain” of the needed knowledge required by water practitioners, public officials, NGO personnel, and anybody else who want to contribute to increase the efficiency and integrity of water management.  This course will take place between September 30 and November 29, 2019. Interested participants may apply online until September 7. There is no course fee. Sponsored by a partnership of international development organizations, the course is free.
  • An Introduction to WASH Climate Resilience Programming – This course aims to provide an introduction on how to effectively implement WASH climate resilience programming. The course will ultimately build the capacity of WASH sector professionals to improve existing programmes, making them more sustainable and climate-resilient. A certificate will be provided on completion of the course. There is no course fee. Sponsored by a partnership of international development organizations, the course is free. Interested participants must apply for this course before Wednesday, October 10, 2018.

WEDC

  • Online courses in Water Management for Development – Some of the core modules are on: Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services; Management of Village Water Services; Water and the Natural Environment; Research Methods; Management and Operation of Water Utilities; Urban Sanitation Management

 

usaidwaterckm

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And the winner is… or the tale of how difficult it is for a young professional from Sierra Leone to attend World Water Week

We were very happy to announce Benson Kandeh’s nomination as the winner of the RWSN@WWW competition last month. However, we unfortunately received the news that Benson will be unable to attend the SIWI World Water Week conference, as he was denied a visa to travel to Sweden. This is a huge disappointment to him and … Continue reading And the winner is… or the tale of how difficult it is for a young professional from Sierra Leone to attend World Water Week

benson

ruralwaternetwork

Sanitation Challenge for Ghana Flyers

Official flyers for the finalists of the Sanitation Change for Ghana competition. Each sheet outlines the sanitation challenges of the 15 Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies and provides an overview of the liquid waste management strategies.

Sanitation Challenge for Ghana Flyers

Official flyers for the finalists of the Sanitation Change for Ghana competition. Each sheet outlines the sanitation challenges of the 15 Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies and provides an overview of the liquid waste management strategies.

Sector Round Up

Big news and big cases this month. Transparency revealed the results of its Global Corruption Barometer survey for Africa, which shows more than half of all citizens think corruption is getting worse in their country, just as a sitting minister is arrested on  corruption charges related to procurement and construction of two mega dams in Kenya. We’re closely following developments.

 

The links here go to original material on external websites.
WIN is not responsible for the accuracy of external content.


 

Transparency International’s Global Corruption Barometer for Africa 2019: Citizens speak out on corruption

Transparency International’s 2019 survey found that nearly one in four people (23 percent) who accessed services from utilities paid a bribe in the previous year. This is close to 130 million citizens in the 35 countries surveyed. Africans who pay bribes for basic service are twice as likely to be poor than rich and young people are more likely to pay bribes than people over 55.  Foreign actors play a significant role in fuelling corruption in Africa through bribery and money laundering.

The good news is that a majority also feel optimistic that they, as citizens, can make a difference in the fight against corruption, despite fears of retaliation.

Read this important report, conclusions and recommendations at: https://www.transparency.org/news/feature/citizens_speak_out_about_corruption_in_africa

 

Cases to watch

Please don’t hesitate to share more interesting links and resources!

 

Anti-Corruption Commission releases report pointing to irregularities in Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority projects (Bangladesh)

There appears to be evidence that some projects were awarded in exchange for bribes and project specifications were not followed, leading to a significant increase in costs.

See more at:
https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/news/dhaka-wasa-projects-deadlines-stretched-graft-acc-1773625
https://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2019/07/19/acc-finds-corruption-in-wasa-projects-drained-billions-of-takas

 

Kenya’s finance minister arrested on corruption charges in connection with the construction of two dams

The minister and several other officials are accused of graft in connection with a dam project overseen by an Italian firm. They are said to have ignored legal procedure to award the contracts and make payments.

See more at:
https://www.dw.com/en/kenyas-finance-minister-arrested-on-corruption-charges/a-49703145
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/07/22/kenyan-finance-minister-arrested-corruption-charges-mega-dam/
https://www.jeuneafrique.com/807821/societe/kenya-libere-sous-caution-le-ministre-des-finances-reste-poursuivi-pour-corruption/

 

FBI raids offices of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (USA)

The raids seems to be part of an investigation into how the city responded to the problematic rollout of a new customer billing system and how it secured legal counsel.

See more at:
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-07-22/fbi-searches-dwp-headquarters-in-downtown-l-a
https://www.lamag.com/citythinkblog/ladwp-fbi/

 

Understanding corruption in water service delivery: the situation in Mexico, illustrated

The Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) released infographics and information on corruption in the water service sector in Mexico, its consequences, and scale. These are useful reference points.

See more and download all four infographics at: http://www.agua.unam.mx/noticias/2019/unam/not_unam_julio25.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Sector Round Up appeared first on WIN - Water Integrity Network.

Winners of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana announced

Local Assemblies and private partners awarded cash prizes for excellence in urban liquid waste management in Ghana.

Winners of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana competition at the grand dignified city award ceremony
Sanitation Challenge for Ghana competition winners at the final award ceremony on 24 July 2019 in Accra, Ghana.

The winners of the Dignified City Award, the last stage of the UK Aid-funded Sanitation Challenge for Ghana Prize, were announced Wednesday 24 July 2019 at the Marriott Hotel in Accra, Ghana. The celebratory event took place under the distinguished patronage of the Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources and was supported by the office of the president of the Republic of Ghana.

Nine Metropolitan Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) and six private partners were awarded a total prize purse of £1,285,000 and US$ 225,000 respectively for their implementation of urban liquid waste management strategies. Winners were also selected on the basis of how they managed to use inclusive partnerships to influence innovations, expertise and investments in their target localities. The private sector and non-state actor component of the award was introduced at a later stage by the Gates Foundation.

Hon. Cecilia Dapaah- Minister of Sanitation and Water Resources in Ghana

The Honorable Cecilia Abena Dapaah, Ghana's Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources

According to the Honorable Cecilia Abena Dapaah, Ghana's Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources and event host, the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana was a success. The initiative was launched in 2015 "to motivate and trigger competition among the Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies to develop innovative sanitation initiatives." Four years later, the outcomes of the challenge have been favourably received, with the Minister affirming that "the Ministry appreciates the passion with which the Assemblies responded."

Overall, it was clear to see that the presence of robust partnerships featured prominently among the winning Assemblies. Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly was awarded the first prize and £400,000 for the Metropolitan and Municipal Assembly category for demonstrating strong levels of collaboration with the private sector, harnessing local leadership commitment and for rehabilitating the local waste treatment pond to generate revenue through aquaculture. Nanumba North District Assembly won the first cash prize of £285,000 for the District Assembly Category for its bi-partisan commitment and outstanding private partnership. Finally, the winner of the Private Partner Prize of US$ 100,000 was TriMark Aquaculture Centre for it's innovative partnership with fellow awardee, Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly.

It was a festive and jubilant closure to a unique competition, but Theodora Adomako Adjel, Head of Extension Services of the Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and event facilitator emphasised that as with any journey, the "Sanitation Challenge for Ghana must have a destination." She reminded the awardees that their newly received distinctions are just the beginning, and "in two years time, we should be able to talk about some of the destinations already reached". 

See below the full list of winners. For a summary overview of all fifteen Metropolitan and Municipal and District Assembly strategies, download the flyers in the section below. 

Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly - 1st prize winner, Metropolitan and Municipal Category.

 "Winning has been very humbling, but it challenges us to sustain the efforts invested so far. Through the challenge, we've come to the realisation that achieving SDG 6 calls for strong collaboration between the MMDAs, private partners and the traditional and religious leaders in our communities. To bring the change we want to see in sanitation, strong political leadership is required"  -  Osei Assibey Antwi, the Metropolitan Chief Executive of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly, 1st prize winner, Metropolitan and Municipal Assembly Category.

Trimark Aquaculture Centre receiving its prize

"Since rolling out our business model in 2010, we had confidence in our idea. We believed we had really prepared ourselves for this prize. Even without knowing about the prize, our passion for implementing the innovation was enough and we were poised to achieve our goals. We appreciate the recognition of our effort and hope to use the prize funds to invest in scaling up to another potential wastewater treatment plant " - Mark Yeboah-Agyepong, the founder and centre director of TriMark Aquaculture Centre – 1st prize winner, Private Partner Prize.


 

The Dignified City Award Winners

Metro and municipal category

Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly - 1st winner, £400,000. For its innovative partnership with the private sector, use of aquaculture, skilled and knowledgeable staff and strong support and leadership commitment from the Mayor.

Effutu Municipal Assembly – 2nd winner, £225,000. For its innovative partnership with the private sector and the Government of Ghana’s institutions, including the local prison service who are using biogas. The Assembly stood out for its highly committed management team.

Sekondi Takoradi Metropolitan Assembly – 3rd winner, £125,000. For its innovative public engagement and high levels of commitment.

 Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly with their award
Osei Assibey Antwi, the Metropolitan Chief Executive of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly and team show their award

District Assembly Category

Nanumba North District Assembly – 1st winner, £285,000. For its bi-partisan leadership from both past and present chief executive and innovative private partnership, especially for sanitation for peace.

Kwahu East District Assembly – 2nd winner, £150,000. For its innovative commitment to the sanitation value chain. The Assembly demonstrated a strong leadership commitment from the chief and presiding member. 

 Hon Abulai Yakubu
Hon. Abulai Yakubu, the Chief Executive of Nanumba North Municipal receiving award from Professor Gyan Baffour, Minister for Planning, who represented the President of Ghana

Special Prizes (MMDAs)                                     

Kassena Nankana Municipal Assembly - MMA Special Prize, £25,000. For dedicated leadership commitment.

Savelugu Municipal Assembly – MMA Special Prize, £25,000. For great demonstration of disability inclusion.

Offinso North District Assembly – DA Special Prize, £25,000. For strong financial commitment.

Prestea Huni Valley Municipal Assembly – DA Special Prize, £25,000. For strong community engagement.

Honorary prizes

Each of the following Assemblies received recognition plaques and certificates of appreciation:

Ahanta West Municipal Assembly, Jasikan District Assembly, Mampong Municipal Assembly, Atiwa East District Assembly, Accra Metropolitan Assembly, Pru East District Assembly

The Private Partner Prize Winners

TRiMark Aquaculture Centre – 1st winner, US$ 100,000. For its innovative Partnership with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly

Clean Team Ghana Limited – 2nd winner, US$ 60,000. For its creation of low cost innovative cartridge toilets with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly

Nanumba North Youth Parliament – 3rd winner, US$ 35,000. For its outstanding community engagement with the Nanumba North Assembly and wider community.

Live Right Ghana - Special Award, US$ 10,000. For its innovative locally-produced reusable sanitary pads and undertaking community training with Nanumba North District Assembly.

Afram Plains Development Organisation - Special Prize, US$ 10,000. For designing and running a WASH inter-school quiz and for developing a low-cost circular latrine with Nanumba North District Assembly  

Training, Research and Networking for Development (TREND) - Special Prize, US$ 10,000. For its innovative capacity building and data collection with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly.

Honorary prizes

Each of the following private partners received recognition plaques and certificates of appreciation:

Adjei Kum Construction Works, Global Communities, Grow Advancement Ghana Foundation, Nyame Tumi So Enterprise, Rural & Urban Sanitation International Ghana Limited, Sap & Sap Ltd, SBP BIO GAS and Volta Waste Limited

 


 

SANITATION challenge for ghana

The Sanitation Challenge for Ghana

The Sanitation Challenge for Ghana (SC4Gh) is part of 'Ideas to Impact' programme which took place from November, 2015 to July, 2019 under the auspices of the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources with funding from the UK Department for International Development. IRC Ghana was the national implementing agent acting on behalf of IMC Worldwide with technical support from MAPLE Consult (Ghana). The objective of SC4Gh was to stimulate competition among Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) and to encourage inclusive partnerships for the design and implementation of liquid waste management (LWM) strategies. It aimed at bringing transformational changes to city-wide sanitation (LWM) service delivery.

The Awards

The SC4Gh Prize for MMDAs was in two stages - the design of MMDA liquid waste management strategies constituted the first stage (Duapa Award) and the second stage (Dignified City Award), the implementation of the strategies. Following several support interventions, over 127 MMDAs responded positively to the call for action and registered their intentions to participate in the competition. At the end of stage 1 on 30 April 2016, 48 MMDAs successfully submitted their strategies for adjudication. Twenty one of the 48 MMDAs excelled and were duly recognized with honorary prizes with 3 winning a total of £75,000 in monetary awards. All 21 MMDA were invited to express interest to participate in the implementation of their winning strategies; and 17 of the 21 MMDAs met the minimum conditions and were considered for stage 2.  At the end of the stage 2 process on the 27th of March 2019, 15 of the 17 MMDAs successfully submitted their final implementation reports for end-line verification and judging.

The final award event brought together Government Ministries, Departments and Agencies, competing MMDAs, private sector partners and non-state actors, development partners, traditional leaders, sector practitioners, the media and Members of Parliament to:

  • Recognise and appreciate successful MMDAs and private sector partners and non-state actors who contested in the SC4Gh and urge them to continue implementation beyond the event
  • Showcase the achievements of the MMDAs and private partners in the management of urban liquid waste using innovative technologies, partnerships and financing models.

The Private Sector and Non-State Actor Prize

The private partner component of the competition launched in July 2017 to boost commitment from the private sector and non-state actors in the implementation of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana, or Stage 2. The Gates Foundation in collaboration with Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) secured US$ 225,000 to be awarded as specific thematic prizes for successful private partners who provide investments, innovative business solutions and expertise to the 17 contesting local governments in the SC4Gh to enable them to achieve the full cycle implementation of their liquid waste management strategies.

 

Winners of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana announced

Local Assemblies and private partners awarded cash prizes for excellence in urban liquid waste management in Ghana.

Winners of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana competition at the grand dignified city award ceremony
Sanitation Challenge for Ghana competition winners at the final award ceremony on 24 July 2019 in Accra, Ghana.

The winners of the Dignified City Award, the last stage of the UK Aid-funded Sanitation Challenge for Ghana Prize, were announced Wednesday 24 July 2019 at the Marriott Hotel in Accra, Ghana. The celebratory event took place under the distinguished patronage of the Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources and was supported by the office of the president of the Republic of Ghana.

Nine Metropolitan Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) and six private partners were awarded a total prize purse of £1,285,000 and US$ 225,000 respectively for their implementation of urban liquid waste management strategies. Winners were also selected on the basis of how they managed to use inclusive partnerships to influence innovations, expertise and investments in their target localities. The private sector and non-state actor component of the award was introduced at a later stage by the Gates Foundation.

Hon. Cecilia Dapaah- Minister of Sanitation and Water Resources in Ghana

The Honorable Cecilia Abena Dapaah, Ghana's Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources

According to the Honorable Cecilia Abena Dapaah, Ghana's Minister for Sanitation and Water Resources and event host, the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana was a success. The initiative was launched in 2015 "to motivate and trigger competition among the Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies to develop innovative sanitation initiatives." Four years later, the outcomes of the challenge have been favourably received, with the Minister affirming that "the Ministry appreciates the passion with which the Assemblies responded."

Overall, it was clear to see that the presence of robust partnerships featured prominently among the winning Assemblies. Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly was awarded the first prize and £400,000 for the Metropolitan and Municipal Assembly category for demonstrating strong levels of collaboration with the private sector, harnessing local leadership commitment and for rehabilitating the local waste treatment pond to generate revenue through aquaculture. Nanumba North District Assembly won the first cash prize of £285,000 for the District Assembly Category for its bi-partisan commitment and outstanding private partnership. Finally, the winner of the Private Partner Prize of US$ 100,000 was TriMark Aquaculture Centre for it's innovative partnership with fellow awardee, Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly.

It was a festive and jubilant closure to a unique competition, but Theodora Adomako Adjel, Head of Extension Services of the Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and event facilitator emphasised that as with any journey, the "Sanitation Challenge for Ghana must have a destination." She reminded the awardees that their newly received distinctions are just the beginning, and "in two years time, we should be able to talk about some of the destinations already reached". 

See below the full list of winners. For a summary overview of all fifteen Metropolitan and Municipal and District Assembly strategies, download the flyers in the section below. 

Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly - 1st prize winner, Metropolitan and Municipal Category.

 "Winning has been very humbling, but it challenges us to sustain the efforts invested so far. Through the challenge, we've come to the realisation that achieving SDG 6 calls for strong collaboration between the MMDAs, private partners and the traditional and religious leaders in our communities. To bring the change we want to see in sanitation, strong political leadership is required"  -  Osei Assibey Antwi, the Metropolitan Chief Executive of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly, 1st prize winner, Metropolitan and Municipal Assembly Category.

Trimark Aquaculture Centre receiving its prize

"Since rolling out our business model in 2010, we had confidence in our idea. We believed we had really prepared ourselves for this prize. Even without knowing about the prize, our passion for implementing the innovation was enough and we were poised to achieve our goals. We appreciate the recognition of our effort and hope to use the prize funds to invest in scaling up to another potential wastewater treatment plant " - Mark Yeboah-Agyepong, the founder and centre director of TriMark Aquaculture Centre – 1st prize winner, Private Partner Prize.


 

The Dignified City Award Winners

Metro and municipal category

Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly - 1st winner, £400,000. For its innovative partnership with the private sector, use of aquaculture, skilled and knowledgeable staff and strong support and leadership commitment from the Mayor.

Effutu Municipal Assembly – 2nd winner, £225,000. For its innovative partnership with the private sector and the Government of Ghana’s institutions, including the local prison service who are using biogas. The Assembly stood out for its highly committed management team.

Sekondi Takoradi Metropolitan Assembly – 3rd winner, £125,000. For its innovative public engagement and high levels of commitment.

 Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly with their award
Osei Assibey Antwi, the Metropolitan Chief Executive of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly and team show their award

District Assembly Category

Nanumba North District Assembly – 1st winner, £285,000. For its bi-partisan leadership from both past and present chief executive and innovative private partnership, especially for sanitation for peace.

Kwahu East District Assembly – 2nd winner, £150,000. For its innovative commitment to the sanitation value chain. The Assembly demonstrated a strong leadership commitment from the chief and presiding member. 

 Hon Abulai Yakubu
Hon. Abulai Yakubu, the Chief Executive of Nanumba North Municipal receiving award from Professor Gyan Baffour, Minister for Planning, who represented the President of Ghana

Special Prizes (MMDAs)                                     

Kassena Nankana Municipal Assembly - MMA Special Prize, £25,000. For dedicated leadership commitment.

Savelugu Municipal Assembly – MMA Special Prize, £25,000. For great demonstration of disability inclusion.

Offinso North District Assembly – DA Special Prize, £25,000. For strong financial commitment.

Prestea Huni Valley Municipal Assembly – DA Special Prize, £25,000. For strong community engagement.

Honorary prizes

Each of the following Assemblies received recognition plaques and certificates of appreciation:

Ahanta West Municipal Assembly, Jasikan District Assembly, Mampong Municipal Assembly, Atiwa East District Assembly, Accra Metropolitan Assembly, Pru East District Assembly

The Private Partner Prize Winners

TRiMark Aquaculture Centre – 1st winner, US$ 100,000. For its innovative Partnership with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly

Clean Team Ghana Limited – 2nd winner, US$ 60,000. For its creation of low cost innovative cartridge toilets with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly

Nanumba North Youth Parliament – 3rd winner, US$ 35,000. For its outstanding community engagement with the Nanumba North Assembly and wider community.

Live Right Ghana - Special Award, US$ 10,000. For its innovative locally-produced reusable sanitary pads and undertaking community training with Nanumba North District Assembly.

Afram Plains Development Organisation - Special Prize, US$ 10,000. For designing and running a WASH inter-school quiz and for developing a low-cost circular latrine with Nanumba North District Assembly  

Training, Research and Networking for Development (TREND) - Special Prize, US$ 10,000. For its innovative capacity building and data collection with Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly.

Honorary prizes

Each of the following private partners received recognition plaques and certificates of appreciation:

Adjei Kum Construction Works, Global Communities, Grow Advancement Ghana Foundation, Nyame Tumi So Enterprise, Rural & Urban Sanitation International Ghana Limited, Sap & Sap Ltd, SBP BIO GAS and Volta Waste Limited

 


 

SANITATION challenge for ghana

The Sanitation Challenge for Ghana

The Sanitation Challenge for Ghana (SC4Gh) is part of 'Ideas to Impact' programme which took place from November, 2015 to July, 2019 under the auspices of the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources with funding from the UK Department for International Development. IRC Ghana was the national implementing agent acting on behalf of IMC Worldwide with technical support from MAPLE Consult (Ghana). The objective of SC4Gh was to stimulate competition among Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) and to encourage inclusive partnerships for the design and implementation of liquid waste management (LWM) strategies. It aimed at bringing transformational changes to city-wide sanitation (LWM) service delivery.

The Awards

The SC4Gh Prize for MMDAs was in two stages - the design of MMDA liquid waste management strategies constituted the first stage (Duapa Award) and the second stage (Dignified City Award), the implementation of the strategies. Following several support interventions, over 127 MMDAs responded positively to the call for action and registered their intentions to participate in the competition. At the end of stage 1 on 30 April 2016, 48 MMDAs successfully submitted their strategies for adjudication. Twenty one of the 48 MMDAs excelled and were duly recognized with honorary prizes with 3 winning a total of £75,000 in monetary awards. All 21 MMDA were invited to express interest to participate in the implementation of their winning strategies; and 17 of the 21 MMDAs met the minimum conditions and were considered for stage 2.  At the end of the stage 2 process on the 27th of March 2019, 15 of the 17 MMDAs successfully submitted their final implementation reports for end-line verification and judging.

The final award event brought together Government Ministries, Departments and Agencies, competing MMDAs, private sector partners and non-state actors, development partners, traditional leaders, sector practitioners, the media and Members of Parliament to:

  • Recognise and appreciate successful MMDAs and private sector partners and non-state actors who contested in the SC4Gh and urge them to continue implementation beyond the event
  • Showcase the achievements of the MMDAs and private partners in the management of urban liquid waste using innovative technologies, partnerships and financing models.

The Private Sector and Non-State Actor Prize

The private partner component of the competition launched in July 2017 to boost commitment from the private sector and non-state actors in the implementation of the Sanitation Challenge for Ghana, or Stage 2. The Gates Foundation in collaboration with Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) secured US$ 225,000 to be awarded as specific thematic prizes for successful private partners who provide investments, innovative business solutions and expertise to the 17 contesting local governments in the SC4Gh to enable them to achieve the full cycle implementation of their liquid waste management strategies.

 

Faeces to fertiliser: innovations to solve the world’s toilets crisis

Faeces to fertiliser: innovations to solve the world’s toilets crisis. SciDev, July 2019.

Speed read

  • Pit latrines still best for regions without sewage systems
  • Improvements include membranes to collect faeces and dry flushes to save water
  • Community buy-in crucial to toilet innovation success

With nearly 1.4 billion people still lacking access to even the most basic toilet, researchers around the world are looking for innovative solutions, writes Inga Vesper.

First, some good news. Since the year 2000, the number of people forced to defecate in the open has fallen by more than half to an estimated 673 million. However, 2 billion people still lack basic sanitation services, with more than 700 million relying on rudimentary holes or pits, a World Health Organization (WHO) report showed last month. scidev

The problem is concentrated on around 60 high-burden countries, mostly in Africa and Asia, where water is scarce and infrastructure — such as sewer systems and water treatment plants — can be difficult to maintain. Open defecation is widely practised in some countries, but it is not a suitable alternative. It contaminates food and water through flies and can be dangerous to girls and women, as it forces them to seek out isolated spots away from their homes.

But changing toilet practices is surprisingly difficult. “It’s something quite intimate,” says Rémi Kaupp, a sanitation engineer for the UK-based charity WaterAid. “People don’t want governments or agencies to impose what kind of toilet they have in their home. What they want is someone to deal with the aftermath.”

Read the complete article.

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SWA at the Stockholm World Water Week 2019

 

SWA will be present at the 2019 World Water Week which will address the theme “Water for society – Including all”

This event is a unique forum for experts, practitioners, decision-makers, private sector, civic communities, young professionals from water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector and a range of fields expertise coming from different parts of the world, to exchange ideas, foster new thinking to the most pressing water-related challenges of today.


Join our sessions which SWA are convening and co-convening with its partners:

 

Sessions

Date

Time Room Contact 

Addressing the elephant in the room: Accountability for SDG6  

More info

Monday, 26th August

14:00-15:30 L12 SWA Communications team

CSO, change makers and allies with government in reaching SDG6

More info

Monday, 26th August  16:00-17:30 L9 SWA Communications team

A WASH-Nutrition Reality Check: Perspectives and a Pakistan case

More info 

Tuesday 27th August 11:00-12:30 M4 SWA Communications team

Monitoring public financial flows and influencing pro-poor budgets

More info

Tuesday 27th August 16:00-17:30 L11  SWA Communications team

For press and media enquiries, please contact SWA communications team via email info@sanitationandwaterforall.org 

 

The post SWA at the Stockholm World Water Week 2019 appeared first on SWA.

Wash’Em – How to design handwashing facilities that change behaviour

How to design handwashing facilities that change behaviour. WASH’Em, August 2019.

In a crisis, humanitarians are often responsible for providing or repairing handwashing infrastructure for the affected population. This creates an opportunity for us to build infrastructure and provide products which encourage people to practice handwashing with soap. washem-logo

Why are handwashing facilities important?
Did you know that having a handwashing facility makes you 50% more likely to wash your hands? If it is conveniently placed near the toilet or kitchen and has soap and water available, then people are up to 80% more likely to practice handwashing.

There are several reasons why handwashing facilities can have an important effect on behaviour. Imagine you are leaving the toilet. If you see a handwashing facility, this is likely to act as a trigger, reminding you to wash your hands. If you don’t see a handwashing facility you might get distracted with other things and forget to wash hands.

Even if you did want to wash your hands where there was no handwashing facility present, you would probably have to go to a lot more effort to walk to somewhere that has soap and water. In the process you may touch and contaminate lots of other
surfaces.

Often the level of effort required would act as a barrier to regular handwashing.
As humanitarians it is unethical and a waste of resources to do hygiene promotion if handwashing facilities, soap and water are not readily available to the population. In the acute phase of a crisis, handwashing infrastructure and products must be our first priority.

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Emergency Environmental Health Forum 2019 report and presentations

Emergency Environmental Health Forum 2019 Report

  • Acknowledgements
  • Executive Summary eehh
  • Opening address
  • Key Note Speech: Disease outbreaks and their control
  • Panel Discussion: Capacity of the WASH Sector in epidemic and pandemic response
  • Plenary 1: Cholera – prevention and preparedness
  • Plenary 2: Handwashing, acceptability of interventions and community engagement
  • Plenary 3: Cholera – control and containment of outbreaks
  • Plenary 4: Hepatitis E and vector control
  • Plenary 5: Faecal sludge management and sanitation
    Plenary 6: Household water treatment and safe storage

Emergency Environmental Health Forum 2019 Presentations

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USAID Updates | Aug 2019 WASH research | Blog updates

USAID UPDATES

USAID Participation at Stockholm World Water Week 2019 – USAID sessions this year will cover topics ranging from the role of women in water leadership to promoting self-reliance through financing of water and sanitation services to building resilient water and food systems. armenia

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Effect of in-line drinking water chlorination at the point of collection on child diarrhoea in urban Bangladesh: a double-blind, cluster-randomised controlled trial. Lancet Global Health, Sept 2019. Passive chlorination at the point of collection could be an effective and scalable strategy in low-income urban settings for reducing child diarrhea and for achieving global progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 6.1 to attain universal access to safe and affordable drinking water.

Experiences of capacity strengthening in sanitation and hygiene research in Africa and Asia: the SHARE Research Consortium. Health Research Policy and Systems, Aug 2019. Strategies that yielded success were learning by doing (supporting institutions and postgraduate students on sanitation and hygiene research), providing fellowships to appoint mid-career scientists to support personal and institutional development, and supporting tailored capacity-building plans.

Toward Complementary Food Hygiene Practices among Child Caregivers in Rural Malawi. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 7 Aug. Selected contextual (i.e., presence of handwashing facility, locally made dish rack and ownership of animals) and psychosocial factors which include normative, ability, and self-regulation (remembering) factors have been identified as strong predictors for the success of an intervention that focuses on washing of utensils with soap, keeping of utensils on an elevated place, and hand washing with soap at critical times.

Broad approaches to cholera control in Asia: Water, sanitation and handwashing. Vaccine, Aug 2. Household interventions only marginally reduce cholera risk. Water and sanitation infrastructure provides multiple benefits. New approaches and institutional flexibility needed to address cholera.

The future of groundwater in sub-Saharan Africa. Nature, Aug 7. An analysis of aquifer replenishment in sub-Saharan Africa shows that reduced precipitation does not always deplete groundwater reserves, challenging the idea that these reserves will decrease in response to global warming.

REPORTS

What Proportion Counts? Disaggregating Access to Safely Managed Sanitation in an Emerging Town in Tanzania. Preprints, Aug 6. This study demonstrates the possibility of using simple survey tools to collect reliable data for monitoring progress towards safely managed sanitation in the towns of global south.

Monitoring Menstrual Health and Hygiene: Measuring Progress for Girls related to Menstruation Meeting Report. Columbia University and WSSCC, 2019. Overall, findings highlight the complexity of addressing menstruation in societies around the world that have ongoing menstrual restrictions and taboos that are relevant for the design of interventions.

Running Dry: Tackling the myths about urban water and sanitation. WSUP, July 2019. WSUP has identified five myths which are stopping investors, agencies and policymakers from properly addressing the inadequate access to essential water and sanitation services in cities across Africa and South Asia.

BLOG POSTS

Reflections on a Review of Studies on the Physical and Emotional Toll of Carrying Water. Engineering for Change, Aug 1. UNC’s review includes takeaways for developing strategies to meet the challenge of water provision. The health problems associated with water carriage can only be eliminated if all households have water on premises, which is one of the parameters of ‘safely managed’ water called for under the Sustainable Development Goals. In areas where water fetching must continue, strategies should focus on reducing the distance to water sources, providing alternatives to carrying water on the head, such as wheelbarrows, and eliminating gender-based violence

For street vendors, finding water and toilets isn’t just a nuisance, it’s cutting into earnings. IIED, Aug 7. Guest blogger Carlin Carr argues that providing street vendors access to safe, clean water, sanitation, and hygiene resources benefits not just sellers, but the wider community too.

Rooted in Research, Handwashing Stations Designed to Encourage Kids to Wash Their Hands. WASHfunders, Aug 2019.

DATA SOURCES

World Resources Institute Aqueduct 3.0 Country Rankings – This dataset shows countries and provinces’ average exposure to six of Aqueduct 3.0’s water risk indicators: baseline water stress, riverine flood risk, and drought risk. Scores are also available for all industrial, agricultural, and domestic users’ average exposure to each indicator in each country and province basin.

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Online Training: Water Integrity – Principles and Concepts, 2019 edition

September 30th to November  29th, 2019

 

On a global scale, the levels of capacity and coordination to protect and improve vulnerable water resources and services are becoming inadequate. Water governance is not effective and is hindered further by multi-faceted corruption. Poor and marginalized communities, people who are the least empowered to speak out against these issues, are the most affected.

Integrity, accountability and anti-corruption are critical to good water governance and quality service provision for all. These principles need to frame policy reforms and enforcement but are too often the least addressed dimensions of the governance of water resources and services.

Fighting corruption requires leadership and courage, but also demands knowledge of the phenomenon to stimulate new capacities and boost change in water resources management.

This training course is for water practitioners and public officials who want to contribute to increasing efficiency and integrity of water management. The course explains what is water integrity and provides examples of how to support integrity in the daily life of water experts.

 

Find out more and register here:
http://campus.cap-net.org/en/course/wi35-water-integrity-principles-and-concepts-2019-edition/

 

 

 

The post Online Training: Water Integrity – Principles and Concepts, 2019 edition appeared first on WIN - Water Integrity Network.

Snapshots from our focus countries: Uganda

By: bori

We take you on a journey through highlights of our focus countries, collected for the IRC Annual Report 2018.

Uganda

Uganda building blocks

Strengthening the S in WASH: sanitation

"The hand pump mechanic has been coming monthly to check on how the system is moving. Especially when we need general or minor servicing." - Miriam Ankunda, caretaker, Karambi sub-county, Kabarole district

In 2018, we've helped the Hand Pump Mechanics Association (HPMA) in our partner district, Kabarole, to start providing faecal sludge management services. We have been supporting the HPMA along its journey to becoming a viable business unit since 2012. This work falls under strengthening institutions, a WASH-system building block. We've helped it with capacity building and most recently, acquiring a pit-emptying kit. In 2018 HPMA's scope broadened from working on water services to maintaining sanitation facilities. The Association is now active in safely collecting, transporting and disposing of faecal sludge, leading to better sanitation services in the urban areas of Kabarole district.

Another related highlight is working with the Kijura Town Council Executive on a household sanitation promotion campaign. Previously IRC and HEWASA conducted a water quality status survey in Kabarole District. The survey found that 80% of sampled water sources were contaminated with E-coli, and Kijura Town Council was one of the most affected areas. One of the main causes was the lack of standard sanitation facilities in many households. Some of those households belonged to leaders on the Town Council Executive. When the findings were presented to the Town Council Executive, they resolved to undertake a sanitation promotion campaign, starting with the households of political leaders, who would then provide a good example to their constituents. The situation has since improved greatly, and a follow-up study showed an improvement in water quality.

Kabarole district hand pump mechanics disposing waste safely.

1 Purchasing power parity (PPP) is a popular metric used by macroeconomic analysts to compare economic productivity and standards of living between countries.
2 Water coverage percentages refer to services that are at least basic = improved source within 30 minutes round trip collection time.
3 Sanitation coverage percentages refer to services that are at least basic = use of improved facilities which are not shared with other households. These definitions applies to all country infographics.

Each of our focus countries have stories to tell. From supporting the development of master plans in our partner districts to running in the heat to raise awareness and motivate action for improved sanitation. Check our other country highlights for more stories. 

Watershed annual report 2018

There is evidence of strengthened capacities for lobby and advocacy (L&A) and WASH service delivery impact in the six programme countries (India, Ghana, Uganda, Mali, Kenya, Bangladesh) and internationally. 

Watershed is achieving the expected results as planned. In 2018, collaboration within the partnership and with external stakeholders increased in terms of complementarity, focus and added value. There is evidence of strengthened capacities for lobby and advocacy (L&A) and WASH service delivery impact in the six countries. The number and quality of outcomes achieved this year is a clear indicator of partners being able to influence policies and practices across all teams using credible evidence.

The five year programme is in its third year of implementation and all the teams are able to describe concrete outcomes. Both governments and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) recognise the importance of citizen participation in WASH and IWRM, accountability and social inclusion. CSOs have been able to engage in effective evidence-based L&A and hold governments accountable. To some extent governments have been responsive to CSO demands.

During 2018, several capacity strengthening sessions took place with more than 1,400 people from more than 800 CSOs and Community Based Organisations (CBOs) across 6 countries, regionally and internationally.

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