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Open Government and Water and Sanitation Declaration

The Declaration on Open Government and Water and Sanitation is an international call to bring together water and open government reformers and mobilize ambitious action that strengthens implementation of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) service delivery. It outlines targeted recommendations that leverage transparency, participation, accountability, and anti-corruption measures in the Open Government Partnership and other WASH forums to increase collaboration and realize the human right to water and sanitation.

Adopting open government reforms can help governments strengthen their institutional capacity, facilitate coordination and trust among stakeholders, and resolve information asymmetries. These reforms can also ensure that civil society organizations and direct citizen engagement have a role in shaping government commitments to transparent, responsive, and accountable WASH services, free from corruption.

At this pivotal moment in time, we have the opportunity to galvanize political will and leverage open government strategies to transform our shared values for clean water and sanitation for all into a reality.

 

Read full declaration:

 

A broad coalition of civil society and international organizations worked to co-create the Declaration.

 

You are invited to endorse the Declaration to send a clear message on the importance of addressing WASH through an Open Government lens, especially during the COVID-19 Pandemic. The Declaration is open for endorsement from open government and water advocates through September 2021.

Endorse here:

English endorsement form

Spanish endorsement form

Or contact Elizabeth.Moses(at)wri.org or WaterOpenGovernment(at)siwi.org with questions about the Declaration.

 

The Water and Open Government Community of Practice (CoP), is supported by Fundación Avina, Stockholm International Water Institute, Water Integrity Network and the World Resources Institute, and aims to strengthen water and sanitation (WASH) services for all and ensure the needs of vulnerable, marginalized communities are considered.

The post Open Government and Water and Sanitation Declaration appeared first on WIN - Water Integrity Network.

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Strengthening WASH businesses in Ethiopia - Intellectual property rights

May 11th 2021 at 14:27
By: tsegaye

Some business owners and government officials have doubts regarding whether current intellectual property rights are adequately protected or enforced once granted.

The USAID Transform WASH team interviewed more than twenty key informants, business owners and government officials, in Ethiopia and the East Africa region to identify the main challenges facing WASH market development in Ethiopia. Based on the findings of this study, this is the third of a series of eight articles that explore the primary challenges that businesses face introducing or expanding their range of WASH products and services in the country. We will also highlight a set of recommended regulatory and policy actions to overcome these challenges. This post covers challenges related to protection of intellectual property rights, a significant area of concern among the key informants. 

According to the UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Programme, only about seven percent of Ethiopians have access to basic sanitation services, and more than one-fifth of the population practices open defecation (JMP, 2019). Achieving universal, sustainable access to basic WASH services in Ethiopia will require expanded involvement and development of the country’s private sector. The Government of Ethiopia recognizes the importance of the private sector at all levels  and leads a country-wide effort to strengthen businesses that offer WASH products and services. The Ministry of Health recently updated its market-based sanitation strategy, which aims to generate demand and expand access to supply of basic sanitation and related products.

To learn more, follow this link to the Learning Note.

Intellectual property (IP) rights are granted to persons or companies for creating a unique design, invention, process, or work of art or music. IP rights are awarded through a legal process and generally give the owner exclusive rights to use their creation for a specified period of time. Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are examples of legal mechanisms that codify IP rights.

If business owners do not earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent, they will feel unprotected, discouraged and may even decline to work in the business. Putting in place robust intellectual property rights fosters an environment in which innovation and productivity can flourish. Therefore, intellectual property rights are fundamental to business investment and growth. According to many stakeholders in Ethiopia, intellectual property regulations needs reconsideration to ensure adequate protections for inventors and businesses. Foreign investors feel the annual intellectual property right renewal process as a risk. In joint ventures the local partner is also obtaining the patent right, some foreign business owners are questionable that it will risk their intellectual property protection. There is also uncertainty about the adequate protection or enforcement of intellectual property rights once granted.

 Ethiopia's intellectual property rights and protection

IP rights for industrial designs enable companies to earn recognition and/or benefit financially from their inventions or creations. The Ethiopian Intellectual Property Office registers intellectual property protections under the Patent Act. (Proclamation Concerning Inventions, Minor Inventions, Industrial Design No. 123/1995).

Two types of IP protection are most common with respect to WASH products:

  • Patent of Invention: This patent applies to the first registration of a piece of intellectual property invented in Ethiopia or for IP that is registered in Ethiopia within 12 months from successful first registration in another country. A patent of invention is granted an initial period of protection of 15 years and can be extended for another five years.
  • Patent of Introduction: This is used for protected inventions from abroad that will be introduced to Ethiopia. A patent of introduction is valid for a maximum of 10 years. However, patent owners must file to extend this protection every year - after the third year - and pay relevant maintenance fees. For some patent owners, the annual renewal process may be perceived as a risk and threat to their IP protection. For example, in the United States, depending on the patent, protection is granted for 14 to 20 years (with periodic fees) (STOPfakes.gov, 2016).

Most locally registered businesses interviewed for this study found the application process for patents to be relatively easy and straightforward. The application process requires a certificate of incorporation, suggesting it is advantageous to be a locally registered business or joint venture (a foreign business with a local counterpart).

For a joint venture, the local partner also acquires patent rights. Some patent owners have said the risks of this increase to their IP protection.

There also were concerns raised by respondents regarding whether current IP rights are adequately protected or enforced once granted. Businesses that have invested extensively in design innovations and their “brand” need to be able to protect those designs and brand names and will continue to rely upon patents and royalty payments to maintain their ability to operate competitively in the market.

Use of patents in licensed production

Licensed production is the authorized production (in Ethiopia) of a product using technology developed elsewhere. This involves obtaining permission from a company (licensor) to manufacture and sell its products. The company in Ethiopia that obtains these rights (the licensee) usually agrees to pay royalty fees to the owner or licensor (Haile, 2018).

For example, a plastics manufacturer established licensed manufacturing and distribution contracts with local manufacturers in the East Africa region, including in Kenya and Tanzania. IP rights (patent protection) played a crucial role by protecting the licensor’s technology, and they also gave the licensee (local manufacturer) a market advantage.

In Ethiopia, the same company experienced challenges licensing a local manufacturing company for production of their sanitation product. If a licensor does not have a valid Ethiopian manufacturing license, Ethiopian law does not permit the licensor to import and own a mold. Injection molds are the main capital investment required to start manufacturing plastic products. Therefore, a manufacturing licensee would purchase and import the mold and would then fully own the intellectual property. Such a transaction would be permanent; in effect, it would not allow the licensor subsequently to change the local manufacturer by giving the mold to a new licensee, if they felt that this was required. This limits flexibility among participants of the market and generally leads to increased costs of doing business, which are passed on to the consumer.

These licensing challenges could be avoided if an enterprise could obtain an Ethiopian manufacturing license. Other options include establishing a joint venture with a local manufacturing company, possibly with specific contractual arrangements between the licensor and licensee, to mitigate the risks discussed above. However, the financial and administrative hurdles associated with these approaches may be perceived as deterrents by potential investors, adding to the risk factors that inhibit companies from exploring local manufacturing of new WASH products in Ethiopia.

Recommendations

Stronger IP protection, as well as longer protection periods, could help encourage certain investors to introduce and/or invent new WASH products and services in Ethiopia. This type of reform also would encourage local manufacturing of essential WASH products.  USAID Transform WASH recommends:

  •  A review of trademark and patent protection systems and implementation of any needed reforms to ensure they are competitive both regionally and globally. Reforms might include issuing multi-year protections, ensuring joint-venture partners can retain certain IP protections, lengthening overall protection periods, and adequately enforcing current laws.
  • A review (and reform, if needed) of importation policies for manufacturing equipment to simplify licensed production of WASH products in Ethiopia.

UNU-INWEH report on ageing water storage infrastructure

May 17th 2021 at 10:21

Earlier this year, United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH) released a report on the state of large water storage dams. The report provides an overview of … Read more

The post UNU-INWEH report on ageing water storage infrastructure appeared first on UN-Water.

How can we finance a future of safe water, sanitation and hygiene for all?

May 12th 2021 at 14:30
By: editor
How can we finance a future of safe water, sanitation and hygiene for all? editor 12 May 2021 - 13:30

FAO launch discussion paper on accounting livestock water productivity

May 13th 2021 at 10:03

More than one fourth of the global population lives in countries experiencing high water stress, and the prospect of facing severe water scarcity at least one month a year is … Read more

The post FAO launch discussion paper on accounting livestock water productivity appeared first on UN-Water.

From service providers to rights-based advocates: the shifting strategies of civil society in Odisha, India

May 6th 2021 at 10:16
By: editor
From service providers to rights-based advocates: the shifting strategies of civil society in Odisha, India editor 6 May 2021 - 09:16

ESAWAS and WSUP renew partnership to strengthen regulation in Africa

May 10th 2021 at 11:10

The Eastern and Southern Africa Water and Sanitation (ESAWAS) Regulators Association and Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) have agreed new partnership objectives to help strengthen pro-poor regulations across Africa.

Cities in sub-Saharan Africa continue to face a significant challenge of rapid population growth but lack capacity to provide water and sanitation services for the poorest residents. There is a need for improved regulation, and realistic standards to be created to initiate action by service providers to meet the increased demand, especially for sanitation services.

Both ESAWAS and WSUP have identified the importance of stronger regulatory authorities in improving water and sanitation services and the need to promote specific initiatives that would bring benefits to the poorest urban residents and support regulators to introduce these initiatives.

A low-income community in Nairobi. Credit: Brian Otieno

The partners, who have been working together since August 2018, will prioritise research and advocacy to deepen regulation of water and sanitation services in Africa. Collaboration will also include joint actions to support development of strategies, regulations, guidelines and standards to ensure equitable access to all rural and urban populations.

“Safe and inclusive water and sanitation service provision depends on effective regulatory regimes that support service providers to prioritise the poor and the marginalized,” said Neil Jeffery, Chief Executive of WSUP. “Through ESAWAS membership, we have been able to widen our reach by working closely with a number of national regulators in the East and Southern Africa region. This renewed partnership provides a fresh opportunity for WSUP to support current and potential ESAWAS members to serve the millions who lack water and sanitation services in cities in Africa.”

Meanwhile, Kasenga Hara the Executive Secretary of ESAWAS said. “We are glad to continue our collaboration with WSUP that will enable us refine our regulatory tools especially those that aim at improving service delivery in low-income areas of our communities. We look forward to continued knowledge and skills enhancement engagements that equip our members to effectively deliver on their mandates.”

Since 2018, ESAWAS and WSUP have pushed for greater recognition of the role that regulation can play in improving water and sanitation services for the poorest and highlighted specific initiatives that regulators can undertake.

Activities have included:
  • The launch of a joint paper series led by ESAWAS on Citywide Inclusive Urban Sanitation that looks at the functions needed to ensure sanitation systems function safely, at scale and inclusively.
  • The launch of a joint report, entitled, Referee! Responsibilities, regulations and regulating for urban sanitation which outlined six case studies of regulatory initiatives, including sanitation surcharges and pro-poor Key Performance Indicators.
  • Making the case for regulators to address on-site sanitation in order to improve service quality, tackle environmental issues and encourage the private sector operators to enter the market.
  • Highlighting the role of regulation through global and regional WASH conferences and workshops such as the urban WASH Inclusion Masterclass in Maputo and the AfricaSan conference in Durban (FSM4).
  • Capacity development support to ESAWAS member organisations on strengthening non-revenue water management, through a series of webinars hosted by WSUP and ESAWAS teams.

Top image: Aerial view of Beira. Credit: Stand Up Media

New FAO Water Report on real water savings with crop water productivity interventions

May 10th 2021 at 10:32

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) launches a new Water Report “Guidance on realizing real water savings with crop water productivity interventions”, that includes clear and … Read more

The post New FAO Water Report on real water savings with crop water productivity interventions appeared first on UN-Water.

The building blocks for successful citywide sanitation systems

May 6th 2021 at 10:57

In cities, formal sanitation systems by and large focus on financing and managing piped sewerage infrastructure. In many areas, these sewer systems are non-existent and where they do exist, they are limited to certain areas of a city and do not serve vulnerable informal communities.

Non-sewered sanitation systems that are based on pit latrines, septic tanks or container-based solutions on the other hand are treated as a household responsibility to be addressed by the private sector. These uncoordinated systems fail to protect public health, safety or inclusivity outcomes. With less than ten years to achieve the SDG targets, the inherent failures associated with sanitation service markets must be corrected to achieve these outcomes.

A SWEEP vacuum tanker making its rounds in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Credit: Green Ink

To support safe and healthy urban environments, sanitation services must be organised into public service systems. This does not imply that the public sector has the sole responsibility, the private sector too can play a key role within a publicly managed system. However, for these systems to function, safely, at scale and inclusively so as to ensure safe, equitable and sustained services for all residents in a city, Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS) is fundamentally dependent on three things: responsibility, accountability, and resource planning and management.

Led by The Eastern and Southern Africa Water and Sanitation Regulators Association (ESAWAS) in partnership with Blue Chain Consulting, Urban Research and WSUP, our CWIS paper series looks at the role of each of these three functions, how they tend to be implemented or overlooked, and how they interact with the other functions.

Download the papers here:

Citywide inclusive urban sanitation: who has responsibility?

This short publication looks at the function of responsibility: the extent to which sanitation authorities are clearly mandated. The publication outlines a typology of the main approaches to defining and assigning mandates for sanitation services to one or more responsible authorities; and provides an overview of examples, exceptions, and implications of these approaches.

Download here

Citywide inclusive urban sanitation: ensuring accountability

Accountability mechanisms help create the incentives that align the mandated entity’s own interests with the public good. Accountability requires a) that mandated entities have clear performance objectives; b) that mechanisms are in place to ensure rigorous monitoring of performance against those objectives; and c) that tracking outcomes translate into incentives for mandated entities. In this paper, we briefly explore the accountability mechanisms that can be applied to the different service provision mandate structures identified in our parallel paper on responsibilities.

Download here

Citywide inclusive urban sanitation: resource planning and management

Scarce global finance for urban sanitation makes its efficient use an imperative. Effective resource management and planning is critical to enable finance to be mobilised, well targeted, and accounted for. The enabling environment to support resource management and planning includes a combination of clear policies and mandates, transparent decision making, and strong accountability systems. To provide some initial insights into these issues, a desk review was undertaken of over 40 urban sanitation investments in 28 countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Download here

FSM transfer station in Lusaka, Zambia

Of course, these are huge topics. We hope these introductory publications will be useful in mapping the landscape and in setting out key concepts. We will be exploring the three functions in more depth, drawing on country-level case studies, in a series of longer publications to follow later this year. Watch this space!

Top image: Waste treatment plant in Chattogram, Bangladesh. Credit: Green Ink

IAHR host online forum 5-7 July, 2021

May 6th 2021 at 10:36

The International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) launch the inaugural IAHR Online Forum, a new series of virtual events aimed at bringing together the community of hydro-environment professionals … Read more

The post IAHR host online forum 5-7 July, 2021 appeared first on UN-Water.

By 2025 we should be at zero

May 3rd 2021 at 16:13

The First Lady of Burkina Faso urges the number of health care facilities in sub-Sahara Africa without effective drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene services to be zero by 2025.

Madame Sika Kabore

On 26 April, the First Lady of Burkina Faso, Adjoavi Sika Kaboré, participated in the Africa Regional Leaders Summit on WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) in health care facilities. She was accompanied by the Burkinabe Minister of Health, Charlemagne Ouédraogo. Together they demonstrated the importance of this issue and their strong commitment and leadership driving WASH in health care facilities.

In her address, she called for urgent action, not only to address the severe lack of WASH in health care facilities in response to the global pandemic, but to correct the massive challenges faced by the health community and the general population daily. Globally, half of health care facilities do not have basic drinking water supply services. Two out of three health care facilities lack basic sanitation services. The First Lady added that ‘there is no doubt that the health and well-being of health workers, patients and many other users of health care facilities are seriously endangered.’

Burkina Faso has mounted a response to this immense challenge. The Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Water and Sanitation have adopted a national strategy which addresses access to water, sanitation, and hygiene in health care facilities. Progress has been made. But, despite the commitment and support of development partners, challenges persist.

The First Lady called on leaders to be courageous and ‘make strong and systemic contributions to the problems of drinking water, sanitation and hygiene’. In her call she referred to her husband’s - President of Burkina Faso, Roch Marc Christian Kaboré - 2015 motto, "zero water chores and a healthy living environment for all!" which reflects a firm commitment to the complete and definitive eradication of water, sanitation, and hygiene problems at all levels.

Zero health care facilities without effective drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene services systems in sub-Saharan Africa by 2025 is an achievable vision requiring a joint effort at sub-regional, regional, and global community level.

Let's follow First Lady Kaboré's lead and do our part in helping get to zero. Whether you are a government official, member of civil society, work in the private sector, an academic, or donor - speak up, make a commitment, and take action and let’s make sure policies, regulations and funding match the ambition.

--

Read the translated speech in English below

The full address in French can be found underneath

Speech by Sika Kaboré, First Lady of Burkina Faso | Ouagadougou, 23 April 2021

 

Honourable guests,
Ladies and gentlemen,

Dear participants,

First of all, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to WHO, UNICEF and all the organisers for the initiative of this Summit, and the honour they do me to allow me to deliver this address in order to share my analysis on the major issues around water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities in Africa.

I would like to take this opportunity to salute the relevance, timeliness and urgency of the issue of improving access to water, sanitation and hygiene in health care centres in light of achieving universal health coverage.

Honourable guests,
Ladies and gentlemen,

The situation in sub-Saharan Africa is worrying given reports which reveal that half of health facilities do not have basic drinking water supply services. This situation is made worse by the fact that two thirds of health facilities do not have basic sanitation services.

There is no doubt that the health and well-being of health workers, patients and many other users of health facilities are seriously endangered.

My country, Burkina Faso, is also faced with this reality. How can one respect basic hygiene rules in health centres without drinking water, without decent toilets, without hand hygiene facilities at the points of delivery of care?

The COVID-19 pandemic reminds us, of the urgency to act. We are not immune to possible epidemics or pandemics whose consequences could further amplify.

We must act urgently, not only in response to the dread the Corona virus is causing around the world, but also to correct the massive consequences of the lack of clean water, sanitation and hygiene in our health care facilities.

Influenza, acute gastroenteritis, food poisoning, skin and eye infections, intestinal parasitoses, all these pathologies have always been spread by poor hygiene, seriously limiting all our other efforts aimed at continuously increasing the performance of our health systems to ensure effective universal health coverage.

Honourable guests,
Ladies and gentlemen,

We must act urgently to establish efficient and reliable drinking water, sanitation and hygiene services in our health care facilities.

In Burkina Faso, we make this challenge our own, to ensure that each health care facility has the WASH infrastructure and equipment in place and is functional allowing essential and quality health care services.

To do this, and despite the modest resources, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry in charge of Water and Sanitation have invested in the promotion of health care facility hygiene through a National Strategy, taking into account access to water and sanitation and hygiene.

Thanks to this commitment and the support of partners, several projects have been carried out and progress has been noted; challenges persist, however.

Ladies and gentlemen,

Beyond the worrying situation in health care facilities, the lack of drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in households is also crucial. According to the WHO / UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP), in 2019, 76% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa could not wash their hands due to lack of running water and soap. This represents more than 840 million people whose health is at risk.

We cannot hide the immensity of this challenge and we cannot hide our responsibility as leaders in our communities.

Although a priority, a response restricted to only health care facilities would be like planting a few trees to restore a forest. We must have the courage to act and make our strong and systemic contributions to the problems of drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in sub-Saharan Africa.

Honourable guests,
Ladies and gentlemen,

In its march towards universal health coverage, my country, Burkina Faso, deeply identifies with the issues related to access to water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities.

And that is why my husband, the President of Burkina Faso, His Excellency Roch Marc Christian Kaboré, has made a strong commitment since 2015: "Zero water chores and a healthy living environment for all!". This commitment is the translation of his deep concern about to the daily tragedies of the majority of our population. It reflects his firm commitment to the complete and definitive eradication of water, sanitation and hygiene problems at all levels.

Zero health care facilities without effective drinking water, sanitation and hygiene systems in sub-Saharan Africa by 2025 at the latest, this is the vision that I would like to share with you at this summit. But in addition, I would like to engage us all here jointly, to face the whole problem and resolutely aim for zero water chores and a healthy living environment for all and everywhere in sub-Saharan Africa by 2030 at the latest: in households, and wherever our populations need it to live and thrive.

I base my conviction on a joint effort at the sub-regional, regional and global community level to achieve these objectives. The entire global health community, taking its responsibility for health prevention, must have the courage to tackle the painful symptoms of poverty, which are the deprivation of drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in households.

For my part, I can assure you of my unwavering commitment to work actively, with the support of all international institutions, of all leaders concerned with ensuring fundamental human rights, so that all the commitments made by Burkina Faso Faso and all the declarations in favour of drinking water, sanitation and hygiene, are translated into concrete actions and changes for the benefit of the populations of sub-Saharan Africa.

Let’s all be committed to ensure drinking water, sanitation and hygiene for everyone and everywhere by 2030 at the latest!

Thank you !

 

Original speech in French

Discours de Motivation du Burkina Faso | Prononcée par Madame Sika Kabore, Première Dame du Burkina Faso  | Ouagadougou, le 23 avril 2021

Distinguées personnalités,
Mesdames et Messieurs,
Chers participants,

Je tiens tout d'abord à exprimer ma sincère gratitude à l'OMS, à l'UNICEF et à tous les organisateurs pour l'initiative de ce Sommet, et l'honneur qu'ils me font de me permettre de prononcer cette allocution afin de partager mon analyse sur la question majeure de l'eau, de l'assainissement et de l'hygiène dans les établissements de santé en Afrique.

Je voudrais saisir cette excellente opportunité pour saluer la pertinence, l'actualité et l'urgence de la problématique de l'amélioration de l'accès à l'eau, à l'assainissement et à l'hygiène dans les établissements de santé en vue de l'instauration de la couverture sanitaire universelle.

Honorables invités,
Mesdames et Messieurs,

La situation en Afrique subsaharienne est préoccupante au regard des rapports qui révèlent que la moitié des établissements de santé ne disposent pas de services élémentaires d'approvisionnement en eau potable. Cette situation est aggravée par le fait que deux tiers des établissements de santé ne disposent pas de services élémentaires d'assainissement.

Il n'y a pas de doute que la santé et le bien-être des agents de santé, des malades et de nombreux autres usagers des établissements de santé sont sérieusement mis en danger.

Mon pays, le Burkina Faso, est également confronté à cette réalité. Comment respecter les règles d'hygiène élémentaires dans un établissement de santé sans eau potable, sans toilettes décentes, sans installation d'hygiène des mains aux points de prestation des soins ?

La pandémie de la COVID-19 nous rappelle, si besoin en était encore, l'urgence d'agir car nous ne sommes pas à l'abri d'éventuelles épidémies ou pandémies dont les conséquences pourraient encore s'amplifier.

Nous devons agir en urgence, non seulement en réponse à l'effroi que provoque le Coronavirus dans le monde, mais aussi pour corriger les conséquences massives du défaut d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène dans nos établissements de santé.

La grippe, les gastro-entérites aiguës, les intoxications alimentaires, les infections cutanées et oculaires, les parasitoses digestives, toutes ces pathologies se propagent depuis toujours par le défaut d'hygiène, limitant sérieusement tous nos autres efforts visant à accroitre continuellement les performances de nos systèmes de santé en vue de garantir une couverture sanitaire universelle effective.

Honorables invités,
Mesdames et Messieurs,

Nous devons agir en urgence pour instaurer des systèmes d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène efficaces et fiables dans nos établissements sanitaires.

Au Burkina Faso, nous faisons nôtre, ce challenge, de faire en sorte que chaque établissement de soins de santé dispose d'infrastructures et d'équipements en matière d'eau, d'assainissement et d'hygiène en état de fonctionnement, permettant la mise en place de services de santé essentiels et de qualité.

Pour ce faire, et malgré les modestes ressources, le Ministère en charge de la santé et celui en charge de l'eau et de l'assainissement se sont investis dans la promotion de l'hygiène hospitalière à travers une stratégie nationale prenant en compte aussi bien l'accès à l'eau et l'assainissement que l'hygiène des soins.

Fort de cet engagement et l'accompagnement des partenaires, plusieurs chantiers ont été réalisés et des améliorations ont été constatées ; des défis persistent cependant.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Au-delà de la situation préoccupante dans les formations sanitaires, le défaut d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène dans les ménages est également crucial. D'après le programme commun OMS/UNICEF de suivi (JMP), en 2019, 76% de la population d'Afrique subsaharienne ne pouvait se laver les mains par manque d'eau courante et de savon. Cela représente plus de 840 millions de personnes dont la santé est mise en péril.

Nous ne pouvons pas occulter l'immensité de ce défi et nous ne pouvons pas occulter notre responsabilité en tant que leaders dans nos communautés.

Bien que prioritaire, une réponse restreinte aux établissements de santé s'apparenterait à planter quelques arbres pour restaurer une forêt. Nous devons avoir le courage d'agir et d'apporter nos contributions fortes et systémiques aux problèmes d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène en Afrique subsaharienne.

Honorables invités,
Mesdames et Messieurs,

Dans sa marche vers la couverture sanitaire universelle, mon pays, le Burkina Faso, cerne profondément les enjeux liés à l'accès à l'eau, à l'assainissement et à l'hygiène dans les établissements de santé.

Et c'est pour cela que mon époux, le Président du Faso, Son Excellence Monsieur Roch Marc Christian KABORÉ, a pris depuis 2015, un engagement fort : « Zéro corvée d'eau et un cadre de vie sain pour tous ! ». Cet engagement est la traduction de sa profonde préoccupation face aux drames quotidiens de la majorité de notre population. Il traduit sa ferme volonté d'éradication complète et définitive des problèmes d'eau, d'assainissement et d'hygiène à tous les niveaux.

Zéro établissement de santé sans systèmes efficaces d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène en Afrique subsaharienne au plus tard en 2025, c'est la vision que je voudrais partager avec vous à ce sommet. Mais en plus, je voudrais nous engager tous ici conjointement, à affronter l'ensemble du problème et viser résolument Zéro corvée d'eau et un cadre de vie sain pour tous et partout en Afrique subsaharienne au plus tard en 2030 : dans les ménages, et partout où nos populations en ont besoin pour vivre et s'épanouir.

Je fonde ma conviction sur une conjugaison des efforts à l'échelle communautaire sous régionale, régionale et mondiale pour réaliser ces objectifs. L'ensemble de la communauté mondiale de la santé, en prenant sa responsabilité de prévention sanitaire, doit avoir le courage de s'attaquer aux douloureux symptômes de la pauvreté que sont la privation d'eau potable, d'assainissement et d'hygiène dans les ménages.

Pour ma part, je puis vous assurer de mon engagement indéfectible à œuvrer activement, avec l'appui de toutes les institutions internationales, de tous les leaders soucieux du respect des droits fondamentaux de la personne humaine, afin que tous les engagements pris par le Burkina Faso et toutes les déclarations en faveur de l'eau potable, de l'assainissement et de l'hygiène, se traduisent en actes et changements concrets au profit des populations d'Afrique subsaharienne.

Toutes et tous engagés pour l'eau potable, l'assainissement et l'hygiène pour tous et partout au plus tard en 2030 !

Je vous remercie !

 

New report sets out recommendations for monitoring the affordability of access to water, sanitation and hygiene

May 3rd 2021 at 11:32

Universal access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene, a human right enshrined in the 2030 Global Goals, can only be reached if countries monitor and address affordability, according to … Read more

The post New report sets out recommendations for monitoring the affordability of access to water, sanitation and hygiene appeared first on UN-Water.

Webinar series: Climate finance for WASH

April 29th 2021 at 09:04

Sanitation and Water for All (SWA), Global Water Partnership (GWP), UNICEF Water and WaterAid co-convened a Climate Webinars Series to strengthen knowledge of and capacity to integrate water, sanitation and … Read more

The post Webinar series: Climate finance for WASH appeared first on UN-Water.

Achieving safely managed water services in Africa

April 28th 2021 at 17:06
By: Grift

Unpacking the challenge of achieving safely managed water services in Africa: based on a discussion convened by IRC for the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, 18 March 2021. The e-Learning event was convened to unpack the priorities and strategies for pursuing safely managed water services while leaving no-one behind.

This Briefing Note jointly developed with the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation summarises the inputs received during the third series of the Safe Water Strategy E-Learning series. It focuses on Achieving safely managed water services in Africa.

We've all committed to achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all. A safely managed drinking water service is from an improved source that is located on premises, available when needed and free from contamination. This special open and virtual event, part of the e-learning series of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and partners, was focused on the challenge of delivering safely-managed drinking water services in sub-Saharan Africa.

In 2017, 27% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa received safely-managed water services. These were mainly located in urban areas where 50% enjoy access. At the same time, only 12% of rural citizens had a safely managed service. The implication of the SDG agenda is that basic is no longer good enough: a basic service simply cannot meet the quality standards necessary to respect the human right to clean water. Nevertheless, the step from basic to 'safely managed' is a daunting one, and unlikely to be achieved.

In the webinar, through a series of panel discussions and break out groups, we unpacked what the implications of a 'safe water agenda' are to communities, service-providers and local and national governments by addressing key learning questions. This briefing note summarises the results of the discussion and serves as a call to action to service providers, governments, research and support agencies. 

Main question: What are the priorities and strategies in going beyond basic and aspiring to safely managed water services - while leaving no-one behind?

Sub-questions:

What are the options?
To accelerate safely managed supplies in easier to serve areas (including towns, peri-urban etc.)
To move beyond basic in harder to serve areas (including many rural settings and especially those with dispersed settlement, difficult topographies etc.)
To approach the challenge in schools and health care facilities
Who can deliver these options? What are the service delivery models?
Professional service providers: National utilities / Private sector
Is there still room for community management?
What is the place of self supply?
What changes are required in the system to enable 1 & 2?
What political, institutional and financial changes are required to enable this to happen (from local to global levels)
Break out groups will look at what we can learn from Ethiopia, Ghana and Uganda (where Conrad N. Hilton Foundation's support is focused) and other experiences to date in peri-urban and rural sub-Saharan Africa contexts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONEWASH Plus in Urban Areas in Ethiopia – Results from the First Phase

April 28th 2021 at 11:02
By: Grift

The ONEWASH Plus Programme (first phase: 2013 to 2019) focused on WASH services in small towns, satellite villages and institutions (health facilities and schools) complements Ethiopia's One WASH National Programme (OWNP), which is led by the Government of Ethiopia. The ONEWASH Plus Programme aims to introduce, test and achieve proof of concept of innovative approaches in integrated WASH service delivery to deliver equitable, sustainable and resilient water, sanitation and hygiene services for all. On the basis of evidence, the programme aims to influence policy and to support the development of capacities at national level.

The ONEWASH Plus Programme (first phase: 2013 to 2019) focused on WASH services in small towns, satellite villages and institutions (health facilities and schools). It aimed to introduce and test innovative approaches and concepts to deliver equitable, sustainable and resilient water, sanitation and hygiene services in towns and satellite villages working in four regions of the country. This synthesis report summarizes learning from the first phase of the ONEWASH Plus Programme. Some of the concepts and approaches introduced proved to be effective and are ready to be advocated as best practice to be scaled through the OWNP. Others were found to be promising but needing further refinement. Lastly, for some new concepts and approaches, there remains inadequate data to draw conclusions at this stage.

ANAM Small Grant Opportunity for NGOs

April 23rd 2021 at 16:31
By: awumbei

Asutifi North District Assembly in collaboration with its partners have prepared a 13-year Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Master Plan. This is an initiative that seeks to promote universal access to safe water, basic sanitation, and hygiene services to about 84,420 people by the year 2030.

A strong local civil society is essential to improving WASH service delivery and sustaining the water resources. Within the WASH master plan, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) have been identified to support WASH through allied action, advocacy, and engagement with the people to build popular support and transparency within the initiative.

Intent

The ANAM Small Grant Opportunity aims to support selected Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in the Asutifi North District to develop advocacy initiatives in the following areas:

  • Sustaining behaviour changes in hand hygiene beyond COVID-19
  • Improving access to WASH services for vulnerable and excluded populations including people with disabilities
  • Reduce inequalities in the allocation of resources for WASH services
  • Improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services and sustainable Water Resources Management (WRM)
  • Improving gender equity and social inclusion in WASH  

The grant will support selected NGOs to carry out public education and sensitisation in Asutifi North District to complement ongoing efforts by the ANAM partners to achieve universal WASH coverage.

Entry information

The ANAM Small Grant Opportunity is open to all registered NGOs operating in the Asutifi North District. To be considered in this grant, NGOs need to submit advocacy proposals on at least one of the above areas to be implemented in 2021 in Asutifi North District within a period of five (5) months starting in June 2021. Note that one proposal per focus area is allowed but applicants are free to submit more than one proposal. Please use the proposal format attached for the application (see downloads below).

Eligibility

The civil society organisation – NGO, CSO, etc. should be a body registered with the Government of Ghana and the Asutifi North District Assembly; and operating in the Asutifi North District of the Ahafo Region of Ghana. The activities will complement activities within the ANAM District full coverage initiative that started in 2018.

Grant information

Funds for this grant is from the Hilton Foundation, through IRC Ghana as part of the district-based initiative in collaboration with the ANAM partners.

The total grant sum is Fifty Thousand Ghana Cedis (50,000 GHS). The maximum grant per project/NGO will be Ten Thousand Ghana Cedis (10,000 GHS).

Assessment  

The selection and award of the grant will be done in May 2021 by a panel of judges with expertise in WASH service delivery and behaviour change communications. The assessment will consider the potential effectiveness of proposed campaigns - Awareness raising; Promotion of best practices; Strengthening local partnerships; Improved participation; Community action; Local innovation and Policy influencing.

Contact

If you have any questions, please do ask for help – Contact the help desk at IRC Ghana: Email: Ghana@ircwash.org or call: +233 (302) 797 473 /74 or ANAM toll free number: 0800304000. See further information on the initiative at www.anamwash.com 

Please Note – Submit Proposals (soft copies only) to Ghana@ircwash.org by May 15, 2021 at twelve midnight.

             

 

FAO webinar: Joining efforts to turn satellite water data into actionable information for farmers

April 22nd 2021 at 09:48

On 22 April, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) host the webinar “Joining efforts to turn satellite water data into actionable information for farmers”. Achieving food security in the future … Read more

The post FAO webinar: Joining efforts to turn satellite water data into actionable information for farmers appeared first on UN-Water.

Lanzamiento virtual del libro : Autoabastecimiento – llenando los vacíos del suministro público de agua

April 21st 2021 at 14:15
Este es un blog de la Dra. Sally Sutton, el Dr. John Butterworth y Matthias Saladin. Ofrece una visión general de la presentación virtual del libro "Self-supply - filling the gaps in public water supply provision", que ocurrió el 25 de marzo.

jacana2

elodieskat

Lancement virtuel du livre : Auto-approvisionnement – combler les lacunes de l’approvisionnement public en eau

April 21st 2021 at 13:30
Ce blog a été rédigé par la Dre Sally Sutton, le Dr John Butterworth et Matthias Saladin. Il donne un aperçu du lancement virtuel du livre "Self-supply - filling the gaps in public water supply provision", qui a eu lieu le 25 mars.

jacana2

elodieskat

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