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Yesterday — 27 January 20221. Water

A learning-based model for entrepreneurial support in the WASH sector

27 January 2022 at 16:34
By: Zohoun

IRC Burkina aims to strengthen the knowledge of young entrepreneurs who can have a direct impact on improving WASH services.

Since 2019, IRC has been implementing a strategy to support young entrepreneurs in the WASH sector in Banfora, through a technical support/advisory approach based on incubation. For three consecutive years, the programmeme has been building the capacity of young people, through technical support on the development and implementation of innovative projects in the WASH sector. Supported by the Banfora town hall and accompanied by other partners including Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and Espace Culturel Gambidi (ECG).

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé, young WASH project leader and beneficiary of the incubator programmeme initiated by IRC, presents his project and vision during a coaching session (Ph. A. Traoré)

The incubator programme for drinking water, hygiene and sanitation projects in Banfora aims above all to support the municipality of Banfora in the implementation of its communal strategic plan for public drinking water and sanitation services by 2030 by involving private sector actors. IRC's support aims to strengthen the knowledge of young actors who can have a direct and significant impact on improving WASH services. This capacity building should lead to the transformation of project ideas into start-up businesses and project holders into young entrepreneurs. According to Juste Nansi, Country Director of IRC Burkina, “it is appropriate to focus during the sessions on the mobilisation of local resources and the sustainability of businesses through profitability.  The idea behind this type of initiative is to turn these young entrepreneurs into leaders on whom to rely for carrying out actions in the sector.

Five projects were selected out of the 30 received in the first phase of the programme, which ended in 2020, and they were admitted into the SiraLabs incubator.  This first phase of the programme allowed participants to mature their project ideas, to validate the viability and profitability of their entrepreneurial projects and ended with the drafting of business plans. The second phase of the process, which started at the beginning of 2021, was mainly aimed at ensuring the adequacy of the prototype of the projects and the needs of the market; reinforcing the managerial capacities of the future entrepreneurs and support them in the formalising their projects.

For example, Bamba Aboubakar Idrisse is the initiator of a project to provide mobile toilets in public places in Banfora. “It all started with an observation. As part of our collaboration with young traders, we created the association of young traders of Banfora. One evening, during a team meeting at the big market in Banfora, I noticed that all those who wanted to relieve themselves had nowhere to go because there were no latrines nearby. So I decided to find a solution for this problem while generating income. Thanks to IRC’s programme, I received support from the SiraLabs incubator. Today, thanks to the training, coaching and mentoring, and technical support I received, I was able to better understand the ins and outs of implementing a project and I am now able to go out and seek funding to make my business a reality.”

From left to right, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain and BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, both project leaders (Ph, A. Traoré)

From left to right, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain and BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, both project leaders (Ph, A. Traoré)

According to Issiaka Boreaud, who is in charge of implementing the programme at SiraLabs, throughout the process, the project promoters benefited from personalised follow-up to receive answers to the problems of creating or managing and developing a business. "During regular meetings, I listened to the young future entrepreneurs to guide them, support them in their efforts, give them the benefit of my experience and make my contacts available to them," he said enthusiastically.

The approach was very participatory with active involvement of the learners and sufficiently practical, supported by the sharing of experiences of all stakeholders and the creation of business management tools. Individual coaching sessions were part of the training provided. It was also an opportunity to learn how to improve productivity and optimise returns in a business. Thanks to the programme, the steps concerning the legal form of the enterprises were initiated, allowing two of the participants to officially formalise their start-ups at the Centre de Formalités des Entreprises (CEFORE) in Banfora and obtain the related fiscal and authentication documents. This is an essential step in the creation of a company in the Burkinabe context and is a good start for the rest of the process and should be followed by the search for funding for the realisation of projects. In this context, the entrepreneurs had the opportunity to meet with the heads of the national funds in Banfora, notably the Fonds d'Appui aux Initiatives des Jeunes (FAIJ) and the Fonds d'Appui à la Promotion de l'Emploi (FAPE) on December 27, 2021. The session continued with a presentation of the financing opportunities available in the entrepreneurial system in Burkina Faso and a theoretical and practical phase on the project pitch.

“The next step is to follow these projects closely to see how the companies will be set up and how they will perform in the market. IRC plans to provide technical support in collaboration with its partner SiraLabs, to follow them and strengthen their capacities to manage their companies.”, said Benjamine Paré, Senior WASH Governance Expert at IRC. 

Furthermore, IRC intends to explore with ONEA and Vergnet, who are now in charge of managing drinking water in rural areas in Banfora, the possibilities of involving young entrepreneurs in the provision of drinking water services. To this end, a brainstorming workshop may be organised by the end of 2022 in collaboration with SiraLabs, Vergnet, ONEA, the Banfora town hall, and CRS to closely examine opportunities for a new round of WASH project incubation by 2025.

Un modèle d’accompagnement entrepreneurial fondé sur l’apprentissage dans le secteur WASH

27 January 2022 at 15:48
By: Zohoun

IRC Burkina vise à renforcer les connaissances des jeunes acteurs qui peuvent avoir un impact direct sur l'amélioration des services WASH.

IRC a initié depuis 2019 une stratégie d’appui aux jeunes entrepreneurs dans le secteur WASH à Banfora, à travers une approche d’appui technique /appui conseil, basée sur l’incubation. Porté par la mairie de Banfora et accompagné par d’autres partenaires dont CRS et ECG, le programme a œuvré trois années consécutives au renforcement de capacités des jeunes, à travers l’accompagnement technique pour l’élaboration et la mise en œuvre de projets innovants dans le secteur WASH.  

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé, jeune porteur de projet WASH et bénéficiaire du programme incubateur initié par IRC, présente son projet et sa vision au cours d’une séance de coaching (Ph. A. Traoré)

Le programme incubateur des projets d’eau potable, d’hygiène et d’assainissement à Banfora vise avant tout à accompagner la commune de Banfora dans la mise en œuvre de son plan stratégique communal des services publics d’eau potable et d’assainissement à l’horizon 2030, par la mise à contribution des acteurs du secteur privé. L’appui d’IRC vise à renforcer les connaissances des jeunes acteurs qui peuvent avoir un impact direct et significatif sur l’amélioration des services WASH. Ce renforcement de capacités devrait aboutir à la transformation des idées de projet en entreprise naissante « Start-Up » et des porteurs de projets en jeunes chefs d’entreprises « Entrepreneurs ». D’après Juste Nansi, Directeur pays de IRC Burkina, « il convient de mettre l’accent au cours des sessions, sur la mobilisation des ressources endogènes et la durabilité des entreprises à travers la rentabilité.  Car l’idée derrière ce genre d’initiative est de pouvoir faire de ces jeunes entrepreneurs des leaders sur lesquels s’appuyer pour le portage des actions dans le secteur. »

Cinq projets ont été sélectionnés sur les 30 reçus, issus de la première phase du programme qui a pris fin en 2020, et admis au sein de l’incubateur SiraLabs.  En effet, la première phase du programme a permis aux participants de murir leurs idées de projets, de valider la viabilité et la rentabilité de leurs projets entrepreneuriaux et s’est soldée par la rédaction de plans d’affaires. La deuxième phase du processus qui a démarré en début d’année 2021 visait principalement à assurer l’adéquation prototype des projets et besoins du marché ; renforcer les capacités managériales des futures chefs d’entreprise et les accompagner à la formalisation de leurs projets.

A titre illustratif, Bamba Aboubakar Idrisse est porteur d’un projet de mise à disposition des toilettes mobiles dans les lieux publics à Banfora. « Tout est parti d’un constat. Dans le cadre de notre collaboration avec des jeunes commerçants, nous avons créé l’association des jeunes commerçants de Banfora. Un soir, au cours d’une réunion d’équipe au grand marché de Banfora, j’ai remarqué que tous ceux qui avaient envie de se soulager n’avaient aucun endroit pour faire leurs besoins parce qu’il n’y avait pas de latrines à proximité. J’ai donc décidé de trouver une solution pour résoudre ce problème tout en produisant des revenus. Avec ce programme de IRC, J’ai bénéficié de l’appui de l’incubateur SiraLabs. Aujourd’hui, grâce aux formations, coaching et mentorat, à l’accompagnement technique dont j’ai bénéficié, j’ai pu mieux comprendre les contours de la mise en œuvre d’un projet dans toute sa globalité et je suis maintenant capable d’aller à la recherche de financement pour concrétiser mon entreprise. »

De gauche à droite, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain et BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, tous deux porteurs de projet (Ph, A. Traoré)

De gauche à droite, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain et BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, tous deux porteurs de projet (Ph, A. Traoré)

Selon Issiaka Boreaud, en charge de la mise en œuvre du programme à SiraLabs, durant tout le processus, les promoteurs de projet ont bénéficié d’un suivi personnalisé pour recevoir des réponses aux problématiques de création ou de gestion et développement d’entreprise. « Au cours d’entretiens réguliers, j’étais à l’écoute des jeunes futurs chefs d’entreprise pour les orienter, les soutenir dans leurs démarches, les faire bénéficier de mon expérience et mettre à leur disposition mon tissu relationnel. » a-t-il affirmé avec enthousiasme.

L’approche était très participative avec une implication active des apprenants et suffisamment pratique, appuyée par le partage d’expériences de toutes les parties prenantes et des travaux de construction et de montage des outils de gestion d’entreprise. En appui aux formations dispensées, des séances de coaching individuel ont accompagné le processus. C’était aussi l’occasion d’apprendre comment améliorer sa productivité et optimiser les rendements dans une entreprise. Grâce au programme, les démarches concernant la forme juridique des entreprises ont été amorcées, permettant ainsi à deux des promoteurs de formaliser officiellement leurs startups au Centre de Formalités des Entreprises (CEFORE) Banfora et obtenir les documents fiscaux et d’authenticité y afférents. Cette action, étape indispensable à la création d’une entreprise dans le contexte burkinabè, est un bon début pour la suite du processus et devrait être suivie de la recherche de financement pour la concrétisation des projets. Dans ce cadre, les entrepreneurs ont eu l’occasion de rencontrer les responsables des fonds nationaux de Banfora notamment le Fonds d'Appui aux Initiatives des Jeunes (FAIJ) et le Fonds d'Appui à la Promotion de l'Emploi (FAPE) le 27 décembre 2021. La session s’est poursuivie par la présentation des opportunités de financement existant dans l’écosystème entrepreneurial au Burkina Faso et une phase théorique et pratique sur le pitch du projet.

« La suite c’est de suivre ces projets de près pour voir comment les entreprises vont se mettre en place et comment elles vont se comporter sur le marché. IRC envisage un accompagnement technique en collaboration avec son partenaire SiraLabs, pour les suivre et renforcer leurs capacités au cours de la gestion des entreprises. » a précisé Benjamine Paré, Expert Sénior en gouvernance WASH à IRC.

Du reste, IRC compte explorer avec l’ONEA et Vergnet, désormais en charge de la gestion de l’eau potable en milieu rural à Banfora, des possibilités d’implication des jeunes entrepreneurs dans la fourniture des services d’eau potable. Ainsi, un atelier brainstorming pourra être organisé à cet effet, d’ici à la fin de l’année 2022 en collaboration avec SiraLabs, Vergnet, l’ONEA, la mairie de Banfora et CRS afin d’examiner de près les opportunités en vue d’un nouveau cycle d’incubation de projets WASH à l’horizon 2025.

Upgrading the importance of low-income customers in Ghana’s water sector

27 January 2022 at 13:32

The more visible low-income customers are within a utility, the better quality service they will receive.

And so, the decision by Ghana’s national water provider, Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL), to upgrade the Low-Income Customer Support Unit (LICSU) into a full department is excellent news for many under-served Ghanaians. WSUP has been proud to support the team in this journey, since the creation of the low-income team a decade ago.

“The Board and Management approved the upgrade to a department because they understand the benefits of serving low-income customers and driving transformational change in enabling the provision of safe water services for all, including the vulnerable,” says Faustina Boachie, the chief manager of the department, about the utility’s decision to elevate the unit’s position.

Boachie has been leading the LICSU since its formation, when it was basically “a desk office managed by one person”. “At the time I was appointed as the Pro-poor coordinator with responsibility for promoting and coordinating pro-poor projects, especially Water for Life (W4L) projects in Ghana,” remembers Boachie.

With a BA in economics, she comes from a humble background, having had to walk over two miles, as a young girl, with her sisters, in search for water in Obuasi, in the late 1980s. As head of the GWCL’s group assisting low-income customers, she has been working with partners such as the sector ministry, donors, citizens, and water and sanitation service providers to ensure more reliable, more affordable and safer water services to low-income customers across Ghana.

According to her, the recent change in status indicates that her department’s work of the past ten years has had positive impact on the general perception around the needs of the sector in Ghana.  “There is better understanding of the social and economic issues around access to water.”

This better understanding has helped place the low-income consumer group closer to the highest authorities within GWCL. “The promotion means access to financial resources, as the department now has a voice within the organisation at the highest level,” explains Boachie. “For the first time in our operations, a budget line for the department has been established and presented to the board.”

This was, by no means, a mere bureaucratic change. “It means a lot,” stresses Faustina Boachie. The team now have a much more prominent position within the company, with direct access to GWCL’s Managing Director. “Reporting to the MD is no little achievement from where we started,” she says. “Within the GWCL organisational structure, only the 3 deputy managing directors together with the legal and communications departments report directly to the MD. This implies a higher rank for LICSU.” The new department now has, as she puts it, “a voice within the organisation at the highest level.”

This new level has also meant more people in her team. “The number of staff has increased to 11, working across 5 GWCL operational regions,” says Boachie, who is also leading an internal restructuring, with a new organogram for the department, already presented to the company’s board. “The approval of the structure will allow for recruitment of community development officers to form and support water user associations.”

Faustina Boachie, Ghana Water Company
At GWCL, Faustina Boachie has led the low-income customer unit, which is now a department

This new structure will serve a larger ambition, of expanding its services territorially and improving its interactions with the wider water sector. “A donor and partners relation officer will also be recruited,” says the head of the low-income consumer team. “The ambition is to go nationwide, and this is possible with the support of the management and the board.”

This growth is already happening, as a direct result of the better access to resources and the enlargement of the team. “We are now able to reach more low-income customers,” says Boachie. “Under the World Bank/GAMA project, we worked with the project team to provide access to about 750,000 low-income residents. We have also worked with other partners, including Water4Life, under the waterworks initiative where we have connected about 3200 reaching about 60,000 people. We are also working with UNICEF to connect 1350 households.”

Proud history and more work ahead

Back in 2011, when the unit took its first steps, promoting the idea of treating low-income residents as valuable customers was a challenge in Ghana, as in many parts of the world, including developed countries. In Ghana there was a clear need to strengthen that idea, and WSUP was directly involved from the beginning.

“What we are witnessing today is because of WSUP’s support,” says the head of the low-income customer department. “WSUP triggered the need for GWCL to establish LICSU. The partnership has been very effective because results have been achieved.”

Read also: profile of Faustina Boachie

With the first steps taken, WSUP then assisted the Ghanaian team, which was progressively becoming stronger and more independent. “We appreciate the capacity building support and the learning exposure visits over the years,” says Boachie, who stresses how that new capacity has allowed her team to establish new partnerships and grow. “Now we can attract other partnerships including with Water4Life, UN Habitat, UNICEF and others.”

As a child, Faustina Boachie experienced herself the harsh reality of lacking easy access to clean water and good, reliable sanitation. She believes that Ghana has advanced significantly since then, and today citizens, including young girls, know more about their rights and how to demand better services.

“Today a lot of households have access to safe water than when I was a young girl,” she says. “Girls have a better appreciation of their rights to demand for services. They know the importance of WASH in their homes and schools.  The educational system has also helped in educating young people.”

More needs to be done, according to her, particularly in, “identifying the pockets of households where access is still significantly low.” Boachie is optimistic and enthusiastic about the future, though, for both their department and the communities it works with. She says that low-income residents should expect more support from GWCL in the coming years.

Read also: safe and affordable water in Ghana

“We are currently working on a strategic plan for the department. We will map the low-income communities nationwide where the department will operate and prioritise areas of operations for the department,” she says. “We are committed to providing services to the low-income communities, so the poorest residents can expect continuous improvement in access to water in the years ahead.”

The road ahead is long, and Faustina Boachie is aware that there are a lot of challenges for the water and sanitation sector in Ghana that cannot be sorted by a utility such as GWCL on its own. “A commitment has been demonstrated by continuing to extend our services to low-income communities. But support is still needed. A utility alone cannot adequately service low-income communities,” she says. “Sharing knowledge with partners, sharing strengths and weaknesses together will ensure that effective solutions are found to adequately serve low-income communities. Strong partnerships and knowledge sharing is the only way that we can leverage our influence, stabilise service, and make performance improvements to advance towards sustainable operations.”

Top image: Inauguration of a network extension in Kumasi, led by GWCL and WSUP in 2018

Before yesterday1. Water

EWP, SOLD and FANMex make joint submission on the human rights of indigenous and rural communities

19 January 2022 at 10:45
By: editor
EWP, SOLD and FANMex make joint submission on the human rights of indigenous and rural communities editor 19 January 2022 - 09:45

World Water Day 2022: Groundwater

17 January 2022 at 15:52

World Water Day, on 22 March every year, is about focusing attention on the importance of water. This year’s theme  ‘groundwater’, draws attention to the hidden water resource that has … Read more

The post World Water Day 2022: Groundwater appeared first on UN-Water.

Resilience of Water Supply in Practice: Experiences from the Frontline

13 January 2022 at 19:45
Guest blog by Leslie Morris-Iverson and St. John Day The protracted Covid-19 pandemic has restricted international travel, cancelled or shifted international conferences on-line and confined many of us to working from home. These changes, along with an awareness of growing and intersecting threats to water supply means it is increasingly important to hear the voices … Continue reading "Resilience of Water Supply in Practice: Experiences from the Frontline"

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Capitalisation fact sheet: Synergy of action initiated by IRC in Banfora

13 January 2022 at 14:32

A collaboration was initiated between IRC, the Gambidi Cultural Centre (GCC), Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and the CDC Foundation for implementing the Water, Hygiene and Sanitation Strategic Plan of the municipality of Banfora. The collaboration aims to create synergy between the various actions of these partners in the water and sanitation sector in Banfora, to achieve the common objective of "Making Banfora the national reference in the water and sanitation sector by 2030." This has resulted in the development of a Memorandum of Understanding between the parties. Monthly and quarterly meetings are organised for monitoring and joint planning of actions. This collaboration has allowed IRC, CRS and the GCC to work together on several initiatives such as the incubation programme for young WASH project leaders in Banfora.

WSUP publishes 2020-2021 Annual Report

10 January 2022 at 09:30

WSUP has launched its 2020-2021 Annual Report, presenting our operations and impact in the year up to March 2021.

Through work in our core countries Bangladesh, Kenya, Ghana, Madagascar, Mozambique, and Zambia, plus our emerging presence in Uganda and consultancy work in Malawi and Cambodia, we were proud to improve the lives of 6.7 million people.
Annual Report front cover
As a result of our work:

  • A total of 515,000 people benefitted from improved water access.
  • Safe sanitation services reached 721,900 residents.
  • Access to hygiene was improved for 5.5 million people.
  • $8 million in additional investment was mobilised.

The year 2020-2021 was WSUP’s first under its new Business Plan, and the Annual Report shares some of our work carried under the five Strategic Goals during the period. Below is a brief digest of what has been done under each of them.

Read the Annual Report now

Strategic Goal 1: Integrated City Development

Water access, drainage, health, street design and solid waste management are inextricably linked. Sanitation facilities cannot be emptied if poor road access makes it impossible to reach them; poor access makes it impossible to lay water pipes; and poor drainage systems means septic tanks and pit latrines are affected by flooding. An integrated approach is vital for reaching the poorest areas in cities.

WSUP has been finding and developing new opportunities to make cities more inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Central to this are the positive relationships we have built with utilities, governments and community leaders.

“By integrating our work into the slum upgrading work, we have reached 4,000 residents in one village alone with safe, resilient and sustainable water and sanitation services,” writes Eden Mati, WSUP’s Country Programme Manager in Kenya, about work that has been implemented in the Mukuru slum in Nairobi.

Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, has been the focus of integrated urban initiatives

In poorly designed low-income communities in Maputo, Mozambique, water and sanitation cannot be offered effectively if other needs are not addressed jointly or beforehand. “The lack of street planning means the latrines and tanks cannot be safely or easily emptied,” says Tunisio Meneses Camba, WSUP’s Country Programme Manager, Mozambique.

Strategic Goal 2: Stronger Service Providers

The second strategic goal focuses on strengthening and expanding our technical and business support to utilities, municipalities and water and sanitation enterprises.

Providers of water and sanitation services struggle with rapidly expanding unplanned urban settlements, and many face challenges in how best to remedy that. These challenges are amplified by poor infrastructure and water lost to leaks and theft. By offering technical expertise, through its Utility Strengthening Framework or delivering targeted support, WSUP looks at how to drive innovation in technology, service delivery models and business design.

In Ghana, that has already been a reality through the work done with The Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA), as Frank Romeo Kettey, Country Programme Manager in Ghana, explains. “We’ve provided training and capacity building to the utility to ensure they can continue to manage these services over the long-term.”

A similar approach has guided efforts in Zambia. “Our programme in Livingstone has focussed on the drought that Zambia is experiencing, and particularly building the capacity of the utility, Southern Water & Sewerage Company (SWSC) through WSUP’s Utility Strengthening Framework,” writes Reuben Sipuma, Country Programme Manager in Zambia.

Strategic goal 3: Enhanced Partnerships

WSUP’s third goal for the period of 2021-2025 is to seek out and build partnerships to accelerate urban water, sanitation, and hygiene provision at scale.

That has been particularly important in work related to policies. “WSUP has formed a close partnership with AMCOW around the development of the African Sanitation Policy Guidelines (ASPG), a major new initiative to help push forward the development of national sanitation policies across the continent,” says Kariuki Mugo, Director of WASH Sector Support.

Beira, Mozambique – where sanitation services for the poorest are almost non-existent – is just one location that could benefit from the new African Sanitation Policy Guidelines

In Bangladesh, Country Programme Manager Abdus Shaheen highlights how central the partnership approach has been in the work WSUP has been doing alongside the local garment industry. “Many of the factory workers live in nearby low-income communities with no access to clean water, safe sanitation, and handwashing facilities, exposed to waterborne diseases,” he says.

WSUP has been working in Dhaka with global lifestyle apparel companies Kontoor Brands, Inc. and VF Corporation to develop WASH improvements both in factories and in surrounding communities.

Strategic goal 4: Effective Policies and Regulations

The fourth goal in our Business Plan is all about driving transformation within the urban water, sanitation, and hygiene sector through rigorous research, data-driven learning, dissemination, and influencing. WSUP works with national and local policy makers to recognise water and sanitation as essential services for all, with clear mandates and accountability processes in place.

A good example is WSUP Advisory’s work in Malawi. UNICEF has contracted WSUP Advisory to provide technical assistance to both Lilongwe City Council (LCC) and Lilongwe Water Board (LWB). As Jane Olley, Technical Manager at WSUP Advisory explains, this effort has been about “defining roles and responsibilities of each in the delivery of sanitation services and developing a formal business plan to manage human waste.”

In Madagascar, those principles have been applied in our work with schools and local communities, in partnership with Dubai Cares, with the support of the UAE Water Aid Foundation (Suqia). “The research relies on identifying implementation and capacity bottlenecks from community all the way up to the national level,” writes Sylvie Ramanantsoa, Country Programme Manager in Madagascar.

Strategic goal 5: Increased Scale

WSUP’s fifth strategic goal is around scaling up in new locations, to bring improvements in WASH services to more people who need it.

SWEEP is WSUP’s ground-breaking model for collecting sanitation waste from under-served communities so that it can be safely treated, and remains the only sanitation service in Bangladesh that is both affordable to low-income urban customers, and profitable to deliver. “In the last year alone, we took SWEEP from four enterprises operating in three cities, to 11 enterprises across three cities and five municipalities,” writes Habibur Rahman, WSUP’s Sanitation Lead in Bangladesh.

WSUP has been supporting a new utility in Uganda with the challenge of serving people living in small towns in the west of the country

In Uganda, WSUP is building a new presence which is currently focused around support from our consultancy arm WSUP Advisory to one of the main regional utilities, the Mid-Western Umbrella Authority, following its creation in 2017.  The work is funded by the Conrad N Hilton Foundation.

“The Umbrella Authority (UA) is currently managing water supply systems for 62 towns organised into 15 branches, and we are supporting 3 ‘model branches’ to develop best practice for the entire UA,” says Philip Oyamo, WSUP’s Resident Programme Manager in Uganda.

Read our Annual Report now

Top image: Student washing their hands in Nakuru County, Kenya.

Making progress on sanitation policy: AfricaSan6

20 December 2021 at 13:05

How can policy initiatives best accelerate the expansion of sanitation services and help people improve their hygiene practices across Africa?

That was one of the questions WSUP and the Eastern and Southern Africa Water and Sanitation (ESAWAS) Regulators Association aimed to address during AfricaSan, the 6th African Conference on Sanitation & Hygiene.

WSUP and ESAWAS were the lead convenors for one of the four sub-themes for the conference, Inclusive Policy and Strategy for Accelerating Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa.

African Sanitation Policy Guidelines
The African Sanitation Policy Guidelines – a framework for driving improved services across the continent

The theme looked at topics such as the role of the new African Sanitation Policy Guidelines in improving the enabling environment for sanitation, how to strengthen public regulation of sanitation services, the importance of strengthening local government leadership, effective sanitation service delivery models and monitoring frameworks, and preparing the sanitation community agenda for the World Water Forum in Dakar in March 2022.

In the Public Sector Dialogue, WSUP and ESAWAS brought together utilities, regulators, representatives from countries such as Zambia, Gambia, Uganda and Egypt to look at some of the critical bottlenecks and identify potential actions. In this session, World Bank representative, Gustavo Saltiel, elaborated how strong regulation impacts service provision, leading to better relations between stakeholders and, as a result, better partnerships. If given the proper positioning, regulation will enhance accountability and efficiency of resource utilization, and as a result, strengthen focus, equity, and sustainability of non-sewered sanitation services.

WASREB Impact Report
Improved regulation in Kenya has driven improved water services to the poorest. Can the same be achieved in the sanitation sector?

In a session entitled Synergizing Experiences for Effective Sanitation Policies and Strategies Across Africa, four partners – ESAWAS, WSUP, The World Bank and UN-Habitat – presented three key initiatives that are central to the increasing focus on sanitation services across the continent.

ESAWAS outlined its work, still at the early stages, to map the regulation landscape across Africa. Many African Union countries have developed policies without considering regulation; yet, effective change in policy environment should lead to well designed and well-enforced regulation, which in turn deliver significant impact on improved services for the poorest. This study’s findings will generate a better understanding of the status, gaps, and opportunities for strengthening water and sanitation services across the African region.

Read Referee! Responsibilities, regulations and regulating for urban sanitation

Building on the regulation issue, WSUP presented its analysis from four countries – Burkina Faso, Kenya, Mozambique and Zambia – on how national institutions can incentivize sub-national actors to improve low-income urban areas. WSUP Advisory, WSUP’s consulting arm for the World Bank, delivered the study.

The analysis found that three elements were consistently seen to be vital by decision-makers in these countries: a fit-for-purpose institutional framework that makes responsibilities for service delivery clear; a healthy regulatory environment with an explicit pro-poor focus and rational approach to setting tariffs; and independent governance of service providers, to eliminate inappropriate political interference.

 UN-Habitat’s work around citywide inclusive sanitation aims to significantly change how sanitation services are implemented across large urban areas. The initiative targets improved use of data, adoption of national and subnational urban policies that focus on sanitation, and increased partnerships between utilities to share knowledge. WSUP will support the work by creating a global report on sanitation and wastewater management in urban settings.

ESAWAS report Citywide Inclusive Sanitation resources
Read the ESAWAS series on Citywide Inclusive Sanitation, supported by WSUP

Sanitation has long been a neglected aspect of the development agenda; with one billion people living in informal settlements and slums and the vast majority lacking safely managed sanitation services, the need for action is significant.

The barriers – including unclear or overlapping mandates, weak institutional structures, systems and skills, and a lack of/poor allocation of resources – are significant.

But as emphasized in the Synergising Experiences session by Dr Rashid Mbaziira, Executive Secretary of AMCOW, sharing the learning from initiatives across the continent can significantly move the water and sanitation sector forward. The policy and regulatory improvements outlined in the sessions and many others at AfricaSan will help to pave the way for a tangible difference in the lives of under-served low-income urban populations.

 

Read more about WSUP's approach to building a stronger enabling environment

 

 Top image: improved sanitation facilities at a school in Madagascar

 

Baka Dawla Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

20 December 2021 at 12:46

The WASH SDG plan for Baka Dawla Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). Baka Dawla Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's Regional State (SNNPR), Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into eleven (11) rural and one (1) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 82,997 (78,900 rural and 4,097 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 30%, 20%, and 0%, respectively, in schools, and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service levels of 21%, 0%, 0%, 7%, and 0%, respectively, in health care facilities.

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Baka Dawla Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Baka Dawla Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

Woba Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

20 December 2021 at 12:29

The WASH SDG plan for Woba Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS).

Woba Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's Regional State (SNNPR), Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into ten (10) rural and one (1) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 66,466 (63,620 rural and 2,846 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 9%, 9%, and 0% respectively in the schools and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 8%, 0%, 0%, 8%, and 0% respectively, in health care facilities

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Woba Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Woba Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda.

South Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

20 December 2021 at 12:14

The WASH SDG plan for South Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling of quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing

process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS).

South Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's (SNNP) Regional State, Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into twenty-eight (28) rural and three (3) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 177,136 (149,510 rural and 12,096 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The Woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current WASH service of 35%, 19%, and 0% respectively in the schools and WASH, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 21%, 0%, 8%, 16%, and 0% respectively, in health care facilities.

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of South Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of South Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

Mille woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

20 December 2021 at 11:54

The WASH SDG plan for Mille Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling of quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH.

The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). Mille Woreda is located in Afar Regional State, Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into ten (10) rural and two (2) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 113,914 (91,827 rural and 22,087 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 3%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 25%, 0%, and 0% respectively in the schools and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 12%, 0%, 12%, 24%, and 12% respectively, in health care facilities

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Mille Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Mille Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

Get to Know Our Staff: Luda Mwangemi-Bruce

15 December 2021 at 19:16
By: Splash

Meet Luda! We are lucky to have Luda on staff as our global people & culture director.

We connected with Luda to ask some questions about her work, background, and joys. Read below for her answers!

Q: What stood out about Splash in the hiring process?

The thing that stood out to me most in the hiring process was the Splash commitment to global excellence. Everyone, no matter where they are located, is dedicated to making the world a better place. I’m proud to be part of such a thoughtful and meaningful organization.

Q: What is unique about your role?

The role of director of people & culture brings together employees and organizational culture to help us to be our best. The role is unique because I have the honor and privilege in engaging members of our organization in multiple countries as well as on multiple levels. Beyond the administrative functions of human resources, this position is about maintaining a culture of inclusion and belonging. Although we all have a responsibility to cultivate a welcoming organization, I enjoy the fact that I can be a part of that every day

Q: What does your ideal world look like? What are your hopes for the future?

An ideal world is diverse, equitable, inclusive, and peaceful. My hope for the future includes a world that is environmentally friendly and culturally competent. We could all use an extra bit of hope these days.

Q: What do you know now that you wish you would have known at the start of your career?

The field of human resources continues to evolve beyond my wildest imagination. I wish I knew that the role of diversity, equity, and inclusion was going to become something as prevalent as it is today earlier in my career. Formal DEI workshops didn’t really exist when I began my career. I wish everyone could learn more about diversity, empathy, and conflict resolution earlier in their lives. Our world would be a more peaceful place. Fortunately, my family and lived experiences helped shaped my perspective on understanding and embracing difference.

Q: Fun fact about your dog, Mylo?

He is an Australian labradoodle, which makes him globally minded, like our entire family.

Q: Coffee or tea?

Tea always. My routine includes a secret blend of fresh ginger, the finest Kenyan tea, and just the right amount of Almond Barista blend. Why? My tea routine sets the tone for my day. A consistent start with a hot cup of peace and tranquility prepares me for whatever challenges the day may offer.

Q: “Kids say the darndest things” — true or false?

True and false. Kids are a raw reflection of our society. We must be mindful that adults model the behavior children adopt. If we are intolerant, rude, or aggressive, those traits will likely manifest themselves in our youth. They share a truth often unfiltered.

Q: Finish this sentence: When I grow up, I want to be…

We always ask people what they want to be when they grow up. The real question we should be asking is what problems we want to solve in the world when we grow up. I want to be the best version of me when I grow up and I want to help others solve their problems along the way.

Q: Is there a fun fact or story behind your name?

My name is Luda. My name has a Russian origin; it means “favor of the people” or “loved by people.” It consists of two elements: lud (“people”) and mila (“dear, love”).

Q: Which way do you think the toilet paper roll should go on the wall?

Either way. I’m flexible, but if you think it is okay to leave an empty roll behind on the wall, think again. If you finish the roll, replace it. Courtesy is key.

A year in water and sanitation: battling Covid-19 and climate

13 December 2021 at 12:47

We reach the end of 2021, with Covid-19 and climate change having exacerbated the historic lack of access to water and sanitation for many around the world.

Despite these challenges, it has been a year of many achievements. With Covid-19 and climate change permeating nearly everything WSUP has worked on in 2021, WSUP has continued to provide invaluable support to city authorities, utilities, local communities and other partners to improve the availability of water, sanitation and hygiene. Here is a roundup of some of the initiatives we worked on last year:

Raising awareness

The campaigns WSUP started in 2020 around hygiene to fight Covid-19 continued into 2021. In Ghana and Kenya, communication around Covid-19 prevention awareness was directed to the wider public, in Bangladesh WSUP worked with garment manufacturers Kontoor and VF Corporation to target thousands of their factory workers and their communities, including women and children.

Improved hygiene practices were taught, and new facilities were installed, and the result was communities actively engaged in the fight against Covid-19 – a reality that will continue throughout 2022.

Extending access to services

WSUP has continued to work alongside utilities and other partners in order to provide access to water and sanitation. From projects in Mozambique, including schools in Maputo and entire neighbourhoods in Beira, to extensive provision of water in new towns in Uganda, our efforts have reached new groups of residents.

We have supported humanitarian agencies to improve water and sanitation in refugee communities, and our Clean Team subsidiary in Ghana continues to provide high-quality container based sanitation services in the city of Kumasi.

Strengthening city partnerships

During 2021, considering the size and complexity of the challenges in water and sanitation that low-income communities face, partnerships between WSUP and city authorities and providers became even more essential.

While in Madagascar’s capital, Antananarivo, WSUP’s partnership with local utility JIRAMA continued to bring very important improvements for residents, in Kenya our work with Malindi Water & Sewerage Company (MAWASCO) is providing Malindi with a long-term plan to sort out its sanitation crisis.

Climate action

In the run-up to COP26 WSUP’s new report – The missing link in climate adaptation: How improved access to water and sanitation is helping cities adapt to climate change – highlighted the importance of building in WASH to urban climate adaptation initiatives. WSUP led sessions at the Water Pavilion at COP26 to highlight this key message and demonstrate how water and sanitation improvements in the poorest communities can increase urban resilience.

We now look forward to 2022 where we will continue to provide urban communities with long lasting solutions and increase the capacity of local authorities and residents to deal with future challenges.

Top image: Hygiene session in Chattogram, Bangladesh, part of the fight against Covid-19

Collaboration with local government : experience from WASH First COVID-19 Response Project

8 December 2021 at 12:38

An overview of phase II activities in Negelle Arsi and Shashamane districts in Ethiopia..

The paper provides an overview of activities in the WASH First COVID-19 response project which is in phase II of implementation in Negelle Arsi and Shashamane districts in Ethiopia. Project partners are Amref Health Africa, WASH SDG 6 programme and IRC.

IRC and partners convene equity and inclusion side event at Mole WASH Conference XXXII

8 December 2021 at 11:46
By: awumbei

The side-session on equity and inclusion was opened with a short video documentary on reaching the hard-to-access communities and schools in Asutifi North District of the Ahafo Region of Ghana.

IRC Ghana in collaboration with the coalition of NGOs in water and sanitation (CONIWAS) and equity and inclusion champions convened a talk-show side event on the theme, ‘Strong WASH system needs equitable and inclusive effort to deliver the SDG targets’ at the 32nd edition of the Mole Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conference on November 3, 2021, in Ejisu near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

 Vida Duti, IRC Country Director Ghana, second from right

Vida Duti, IRC Ghana Country Director stated in her opening comments as one of the expert panel discussants, “ensuring universal access to safe and affordable WASH for all by 2030 requires strong WASH systems to deliver the targets. And strong WASH systems rely on equitable and inclusive multiple actors to deliver safe and sustainable WASH services to everyone.” She used the analogy of a radio set that requires functional parts to be fully operational to further explain the WASH system, stating that the relevant building blocks need to be in place and strengthened to enable the delivery of WASH services to all.

“This interactive talk show session with sector champions helps to practically unpack equity and inclusion issues within the context of WASH systems strengthening, share experiences and reflect on how to reach the hard-to-reach and the excluded; and also what various actors need to know and do to ensure inclusive advance towards universal access - leaving no one behind,” Vida added.

To set the context for the one-and-half hour side session, a short video documentary on reaching the hard-to-access communities and schools in Asutifi North District of the Ahafo Region of Ghana was shown, highlighting the WASH situation of the excluded schools and communities and the drive under the Asutifi North Ahonedia Mpuntuo (ANAM) initiative to achieve services for everyone by 2030.

Two presenters at the side event of Mole Conference XXXII 

Umaru-Sanda Amadu, a popular local radio and television presenter with Accra based CitiFM/ TV facilitated the follow-up expert panel talk show featuring Yaw Obeng-Poku, Director at the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources; Vida Duti, IRC Country Director; Awudu Modoc, Executive Director, Afram Plains Development Organisation; Victoria Norgbey, Executive Director, Apex Body of Women in Poultry Value Chain; and Emmanuel Marfo, CEO of Global Alliance for Development Foundation.

Talk show Reflections

The talk-show delved into WASH sector progress status, the WASH system, equity and inclusion in WASH issues - barriers to inclusion and what it takes to bridge the gaps. The session also elicited expert panel perspectives to deepen awareness and interest around the challenges of inclusion to inform the advocacy for all-inclusive WASH prioritisation and action towards achieving Sustainable Development Goal 6.

The discussants acknowledged that Ghana is making steady progress towards achieving the WASH targets and a range of social protection and inclusion programmes developed and being implemented, and that lingering exclusions and equity issues indicate the need to intensify more targeted and harmonised advocacy efforts towards establishing inclusive and resilient delivery mechanisms for WASH services to all – including hard-to-access communities and inner-city residents.

The session reflected on the commitment of the country to achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all – noting that a safely managed drinking water service is from an improved source that is located on premises, available when needed and free from contamination. It was admitted that unless deliberate and inclusive measures are taken to accelerate accessibility on premises whilst reaching the hard-to-access communities, achieving safely managed and universal coverage targets may prove difficult.

Discussion during the side event at the Mole Conference XXXII

The interactive session called for, i) an appropriate and innovative mix of water supply technologies and user-friendly delivery methods to be deployed in hard-to-access communities to provide safe water to everyone in an equitable manner; ii) a systems approach backed by enabling environment is needed to entice and motivate social enterprises and private sector investments and partnerships to accelerate WASH service delivery to all; iii) continuous community sensitisation on issues of equity and inclusion and periodic capacity enhancement of water and sanitation management teams for effective operation and maintenance of water facilities; and iv) research, innovation and learning on good inclusion practices, models, approaches and technologies should be documented and promoted for uptake and replication.

The side session further called on the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources to consider equity and inclusion issues in the ongoing sector policy reviews; revise the Ghana WASH sector gender mainstreaming guidelines and toolkit; and to co-ordinate the roll-out training and mainstreaming into WASH plans and processes at all levels.

In his short remarks, Attah Arhin, chairman of CONIWAS assured participants that matters arising from the discussions and the recommendations made will inform the conference communiqué. He pledged the commitment of the coalition in working with partners like IRC to uphold issues of inclusion, empower citizens and collectively advocate for the elimination of barriers to social inclusion.

Umaru-Sanda Amadu brought the session to a close with a call on participants to continue to reflect as individuals and institutions on how to ensure inclusive advance towards universal access bearing in mind that - “Inclusion is not just about improving access to services for those who are currently excluded but also empowering people to engage in wider processes of decision making to ensure that their rights and needs are recognised."

About fifty (50) stakeholders drawn from local and national government institutions, private sector, research institutions, local and international NGOs, and the media were at the side event. Overall, the side event was considered by most participants as very interactive and revealing.

What I’ve learned in 10 years of working to make water, sanitation and hygiene inclusive

6 December 2021 at 08:16
by Louisa Gosling on 3 December 2021 on WaterAid WASHmatters, originally a keynote speech at the 42nd WEDC Conference Are we doing enough to make water, sanitation and hygiene services as inclusive as possible? Louisa Gosling shares her reflections on how far we have come, and what else we need to achieve. I started working on equality, inclusion and … Continue reading "What I’ve learned in 10 years of working to make water, sanitation and hygiene inclusive"

ruralwaternetwork

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The women's group holding a meeting, in the village of Samabogo, in the Circle of Bla, Region of Segou, Mali, May 2017

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Mickson Jakalasi, drawing water from a disability friendly borehole, Simulemba Health Centre, Kasungu, Malawi, July 2018.

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What about me' workshop in Kampot Province, Cambodia, September, 2019.

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Driving the change together: transforming local WASH systems

2 December 2021 at 08:44

Kabarole District and IRC Uganda wrap up a successful Sustainable WASH Systems (SWS) learning partnership, a collaborative project that has harnessed decentralised systems and structures to strengthen rural water supply and small-town sanitation services.

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) SWS Learning Partnership, IRC facilitated the Kabarole District WASH Task Team (DWTT) to adopt the learning alliance approach and transform into a platform for reflection, experiential learning and sharing, action research, planning, and monitoring, as well as advocacy and influencing for policies that promote Kabarole’s goal of universal access by 2030.

“The learning alliance approach broadened our space and capacity to coordinate every stakeholder – whether individual or institution – to contribute to the vision: it is like building the kingdom of God with each one of us bringing a different but critical brick to the construction site,” Richard Rwabuhinga, LC5 Chairman Kabarole DLG and member of the DWTT.

The DWTT membership comprises of political leaders and technical officers of the local government as well as private sector, civil society, religious institutions, and the media. Over the past five years, the DWTT has thrived as the bridge that connects service users to the providers, grassroot associations to sub-national agencies, and private entrepreneurs to policy makers, towards achieving Kabarole’s shared WASH agenda. 

 Milestones along the journey

The first major undertaking of the DWTT was to steer the development of the Kabarole District WASH master plan 2017 - 2030:  a blueprint of what needs to be done by when, how much it will cost to deliver safe and full water, sanitation, and hygiene services to all the people of Kabarole.

“We are keeping track of the targets and influencing for budget allocation to least served populations. As the Chairman of the WASH task team as well as Secretary for Works and Technical Services, I provide background information during the committee of council seating to ensure that we incorporate the proposals and targets of the WASH master plan,” Aaron Byakutaaga, Chairman DWTT.

There is now more deliberate connection between the demand and supply loops of WASH services in the district. On the demand side, communities through their water user committees have acquired skills to collect and save money for operations and maintenance. On the supply side, hand pump mechanics have benefited from the learning opportunities and capacity strengthening organised by the DWTT.

“They [DWTT] do not just tell us what to do, but they show us what is working elsewhere, and support us to replicate. They took us on a peer learning visit to Kamuli district. Today, KAHASA is the go-to service provider in the community for operations and maintenance for pay-as-you-fetch water points,” Stephen Balyebuga, Publicity Secretary, Kabarole Handpump Mechanics Association (KAHASA).

Looking ahead

The project time may be over but learning and transformation continues. The DWTT envisages itself as a forum that will continue to coordinate stakeholders, influence policy and mobilise resources to drive safe water supply and sustainable sanitation in Kabarole.

“At IRC, we know from experience and evidence that no single person or entity can create lasting solutions for the immense WASH challenges. We applaud the Kabarole DWTT for driving a shared vision and providing a befitting platform for advocacy and influencing not only for universal access, but for safe, sustainable water and sanitation services that last. It is a living example that learning alliances work and should be replicated in all the districts of Uganda, ” Jane Nabunnya Mulumba, Country Director IRC Uganda.

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