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Yesterday — 6 July 20222. Sanitation

Town sanitation plans for four towns in Kabarole District, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:46

Each town sanitation plan is a strategic and integrated documentation of sanitation interventions and services tailored to Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

Kijura Town Council working on the Town Sanitation Plan

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH master plan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH master plan, with Kabarole district in the lead.

IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

These plans providing a strategic framework to deliver and improve sanitation in the selected towns through short-, medium-, and long-term goals. Town Sanitation Plans aim at coordinating and integrating various sanitation-related measures at the town council level including physical planning, sanitation marketing, Behaviour Change Communication (BCC), local private sector involvement, law enforcement, and full stakeholder participation, among others.

Each town sanitation plan is a strategic and integrated documentation of sanitation interventions and services in the town councils. This is not a conventional technical sanitation master plan focusing on engineering and financial aspects, rather it sets out the strategies, objectives, targets, operational actions, and resources needed to achieve the vision and objectives for improvements along the sanitation value chain in the town councils.

The planning process and the results are derived from consultation with local stakeholders; capturing realities and proposing solutions that are locally generated by the stakeholders and not technocrats outside the town council.  The target groups are technical and non-technical stakeholders (residents, Community Based Organisations and funding agencies based in Kijura or the region, Non-Governmental Organisations, National Water and Sewerage Corporation, Kabarole District Local Government and Town Council) who have an interest in improving sanitation at the local level.

The actions and interventions presented in the plan are focused on improving sanitation in households, public schools, public places (e.g., markets, bus/taxi stops), and healthcare facilities. In addition, the plan proposes interventions to improve the collection and treatment of faecal sludge in the town. The planning horizon is set until the year 2040.

The plans also outline estimates on the required investments to be made either by the Town Council, Kabarole District Local Government (KDLG), and/or donor agencies for improvements along the sanitation value chain.       

The development of the Town Sanitation Plans (TSPs) was facilitated by IRC Uganda with funding from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation for Kijuura and Mugusu Town Councils, and the Waterloo Foundation for Kasenda and Kiko Town Councils.

Town sanitation plan for Mugusu Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:25

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

This Town Sanitation Plan for Mugusu Town Council provides a costed strategic approach towards achieving improved sanitation services for households and institutions and the entire service chain in Mugusu Town Council. To ensure the sustainability of this plan, a Sanitation Task Force was formed and trained to build their capacity in handling hygiene and sanitation-related issues. A Sanitation Stakeholders Forum was also formed comprising of different stakeholders relevant in the WASH sector to validate the baseline findings and support the implementation of the Plan.

Town sanitation plan for Kijura Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:17

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The objective of the Kijura Town Sanitation Plan is to ensure proper handling of human waste both within the households and institutions. To ensure the sustainability of this plan, a Sanitation Task Force  was formed and trained to build their capacity in handling hygiene and sanitation-related issues.

Town sanitation plan for Kiko Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:09

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The vision of the Kiko Town Sanitation Plan is: "Achieving universal access to sustainable sanitation for a clean, healthy and productive urban environment by 2040 through active participation of all stakeholders."

The vision will be achieved through 15 objectives with targets in the short term until 2025, mid-term until 2030 and long-term
until 2040. 

Town sanitation plan for Kasenda Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 12:55

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The vision of Kasenda Town Sanitation Plan is: "Achieving a healthy tourism town with universal access to sustainable sanitation and an improved community livelihood for all by 2040 through engaging all stakeholders."

The vision will be achieved through 17 objectives with targets in the short term until 2025, mid-term until 2030 and long-term
until 2040.

Before yesterday2. Sanitation

Role of private sector in universal access to sanitation

5 July 2022 at 12:24

New free online course on Market-Based Sanitation.

A new online course on the basics of market-based sanitation brings together the latest thinking from around the world on enabling the private sector to contribute to improved and safely managed sanitation services. It has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. The course aims to equip users with insights and tools on the role of market-based sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services.

The scale of investment required to deliver sanitation goods and services to those who lack access is beyond the capacity of public finance alone. As Monte Achenbach, one of the course contributors and PSI’s chief of party for Transform WASH, said, ‘Imagine that a government needs to provide sanitation services to each household? That cannot be achieved by government action on their own. It is beyond the means of any government. This means there is a clear role for households to invest in improved sanitation services and for the private sector to produce and sell an array of products to meet their needs.’

Changing mindsets

Approaching sanitation as a market requires a shift in mind set, especially in governments and development partners. They often see businesses as input suppliers and contractors. In a market-based sanitation approach, businesses can engage in demand creation, manufacturing of goods and services (such as slab manufacturing, installation of toilets), and promotion and sales of goods and services (such as retailers and sales agents) to accelerate access to basic (improved) sanitation services.

Another shift in mindset that is needed is viewing households as consumers, moving away from the traditional view of households as beneficiaries, which too often resulted in offering them products that failed to meet their demand, aspirations or needs.

Market-based sanitation focuses on households as active customers of products and services. It takes a user-centred and business supplier approach to developing and producing sanitation products and services that people want and can afford and that businesses can deliver and sell profitably. The goal of building sanitation markets is to achieve ever-expanding, self-sustaining household demand for, and access to, new products and services.

Sanitation as a service

The other shift in thinking required is to see sanitation as a service that is much more than a toilet. To ensure sustainable access to safe sanitation, this concept of a service comprises much more than a physical structure. The sanitation service chain consists of six connected functions: capturing, containing, emptying, transporting, treating, and safely disposing or reusing human waste (i.e., faeces and urine, possibly including black water and grey water, see figure below).

Sanitation service chain

Access to sanitation requires products and services at both the household and the community level. The private sector is an essential part of the solution and can provide products and services for the entire sanitation service chain.

Part of a holistic approach

Market-based sanitation is an essential part of a holistic approach towards reaching safely managed sanitation services (i.e., Sustainable Development Goal 6). Specifically, it's about moving up the sanitation service ladder from a limited to a basic service and, ultimately, to safely managed services for all. It is linked to other approaches for reaching SDG 6, as well (see image below):

Market-based sanitation (MBS) is an umbrella term and includes approaches such as ‘sanitation market shaping,’ ‘sanitation as a business,’, and ‘sanitation marketing’ (or ‘SanMark’). While individual understanding and definitions may vary, the MBS approach focuses generally on improving private sector capacity to supply sanitation products and services and increasing customer demand through commercial marketing techniques. It includes a comprehensive approach toward the WASH system to create a thriving sanitation market in a country.

Social and Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC) is a communication strategy that encourages individuals and communities to adopt new behaviours. It is a strategy that triggers people and their communities to adopt healthy, beneficial, and positive behavioural practices.

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) or community-led total sanitation and hygiene (CLTS-H) is a rural-focused behaviour change approach for ending open defecation through community participation. In simplified terms, CLTS-H (or similar community approaches to total sanitation) focus on getting people to stop defecating in the open and to start using a self-constructed (often unimproved) pit latrine.

Microfinance is the provision of small (aka “micro”) loans to low-income individuals or businesses with minimal collateral requirements.

Subsidies can be powerful and progressive tools for increasing water and sanitation access when they are designed in specific measurable achievable and realistic, timely and targeted ways and implemented effectively. This is part of session 7.

Public investments by governments (from taxes or transfers) in sanitation services will always be needed. No country in the world has realised safely managed water and sanitation services for all without public investments.

Together, this mix of approaches, with a wider strengthening of the WASH system on factors such as finance, demand, community by-law, can realise safely managed sanitation services for all.

JMP sanitation ladder

Image: The JMP sanitation service ladder with approaches to move from open defecation towards safely managed sanitation services (i.e., SDG 6). Adapted from Trémolet, S. (2012). Sanitation markets: Using economics to improve the delivery of services along the sanitation value chain.

Market-based sanitation: the basics

The free 12-hour online course provides insights and tools for the private sector to contribute to improved and safely managed sanitation services (i.e., realising Sustainable Development Goal 6) by 2030. To reach SDG 6, the private sector is essential in providing products and services that people need and want.

By the end of the course, users will have a good understanding of the role of market-based sanitation as part of strong WASH systems needed to realise universal and sustainable sanitation services. Users will know:

  • What market-based sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying market-based sanitation
  • Market-based sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems

The course is available on the WASH Systems Academy as a self-paced and self-guided course. It can also be used in combination with webinars, group work, on the job support or part of a 3-day workshop.

The online course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics’ is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy.

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About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments.

We're all about partnership for impact

29 June 2022 at 17:15

IRC is all about partnership for impact and 2021 saw us create exciting new partnerships and consolidate existing ones.

IRC annual report cover photo 2021

Destination 2030: a vision of local, national and global impact and scale

2021 was the final year of our medium-term strategic plan (2017-21), and we ended it on an upbeat note when, in August, we cemented our Alliance with Water For People and launched our visionary Destination 2030 Strategy. The vision is clear: the passionate pursuit of sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services for all. Working together to drive exponential progress in the delivery of WASH, and guided by our shared Destination 2030 Strategy, we will serve 20 million, reach 200 million and change the system. By 2030 we will have radically increased our impact while tripling the annual investment in water and sanitation systems.

Leveraging partnerships and building new relationships in our partner districts

Destination 2030 is all about a shared commitment to scale, impact and change, with the delivery of services to everyone in our partner districts at its heart. Four years after launching the first district 'master plan' (in Asutifi North, Ghana, in March 2018) we continue to see the results that come from empowered local leadership and collective action around a shared vision of access for all. That original master plan has now been joined by 18 others, of which six were finalised, validated and approved by district leadership in 2021.

In Niger, our two partner districts are the only ones – out of 266 communes – to have master plans. Regular service level monitoring means that these district governments are also the only ones to base their decisions on accurate knowledge of WASH service levels in local health centres and schools. In Ghana, the work of implementing the master plan in Asutifi North district has led to the creation of the National Development Planning Commission's WASH Toolkit for the sector. And some districts, like Asutifi North, are on track to reach their entire population with safe water services by 2030. Other areas, like Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger, are faced with continuous security challenges, and partners in these areas need to find new ways of working. In 2021, IRC and its partners started using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to pinpoint the location of vulnerable populations and identify ways to reach them.

The move towards more professionally managed rural water supplies continues. 2021 was also the year where we showed how important it is to deepen our relationships with utilities, in rural as well as urban areas. Professionally managed water services can contribute to overcoming common challenges related to rural water service provision, including low management capacity and performance of service providers, in order to ensure sustainable basic, and where possible, safely managed water services.

For example, in Uganda we formed a tri-partite partnership with the National Water and Sewerage Corporation and Kabarole District Local Government to extend a piped water system network to ensure 100% sustainable access to the 12,800 people living in Kabende sub-county. We also worked on influencing Burkina Faso's national utility, ONEA, to increase its focus on reaching people in small towns. This will include services for 10,000 people.

Other partnerships

Our new Partnership for WASH Systems in Africa with UNICEF and Water For People is strengthening national WASH systems in 19 countries in Africa. We do this by improving sector capacities, and knowledge management, advocating for systems change at national and regional levels and providing technical assistance in WASH systems strengthening to UNICEF country offices. An important part of this has been updating UNICEF's systems and finance courses on the Agora training platform together with our WASH Systems Academy.

This year, our WASH Systems Academy had 1,066 participants with 1,404 enrolments and 483 certificates. In Ethiopia we used the online WASH Systems Academy, together with in-person workshops, to tailor the course to the local context.

Public Development Banks are central to improving the financing of the water and sanitation sector, and it is only when the sector is strong that we can achieve SDG 6, the Paris Agreement objectives and enhance biodiversity protection. Building on studies conducted as part of our consultancy work, the Agence Française de Développement (AFD) launched a Water Finance Coalition of Public Development Banks. IRC acts as the Secretariat of the coalition.

We also contributed to other partnerships, networks and global platforms including Agenda for Change, Millennium Water Alliance, Netherlands Water Partnership NGO Platform, Rural Water Supply Network, Sanitation and Water for All (SWA), UN Water and Water Integrity Network. This included supporting the leadership of Agenda for Change to change its governance to one that puts country collaborations at the centre.

Challenges and what's next

As in every year, we faced challenges. Covid-19 tested our ability to work through sporadic lockdowns, while political conflict in many of our focus countries tested the resolve of our teams and the incremental improvement that lies at the heart of our systems strengthening approach.

The world is not on track to deliver its 2030 goals for safe and sustainable drinking water and sanitation services to everyone. Efforts are confronted by a lack of high-level political vision and leadership in many countries. There are too few Swachh Bharats or Jal Jeevans, and too many countries and actors that still see providing a shared handpump or pit latrine as appropriate goals. They are not! Scaling the successes we've seen in our partner districts, especially the expansion of professionally and safely managed services, requires clear and strong political commitment not just to systems strengthening – but to profound systems change.

Triggering and supporting this change is at the heart of Destination 2030. It is also the reason for our continued support to key partnerships like Agenda for Change and Sanitation and Water for All. In order to widen and reinforce the network of likeminded partners committed to this change, we will host signature events in 2022 and 2023: All Systems Go Africa in Ghana in October 2022, and All Systems Connect in the Netherlands in May 2023. We hope you'll join us.

Read our Annual Report 2021, our Monitoring Report 2021 and our 2021 Financial Report for more highlights and details of our work.

IRC at a glance 2021

Join the course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The basics’

28 June 2022 at 09:04

How do you go from open defecation and unsafe sanitation to reliable and sustainable services?

Opening slide WASH Systems Academy course on market-based sanitation

Making sure that even the simplest services are maintained depends on the ongoing collaboration of a complex network of individuals and organisations. It's about strengthening the systems (i.e., the actors and factors) needed to deliver sanitation services.

Market-Based Sanitation (MBS) interventions are a promising approach to addressing (a part) of the global sanitation challenge sustainably and at scale. It is particularly suitable in settings in which households use traditional unimproved pit latrines but do not yet have access to affordable products and services to build an improved sanitation facility.

In this course, Market-Based Sanitation refers to strengthening the private sector in delivering products and services for the construction of improved onsite sanitation facilities, and to increase the willingness of end users to invest in the construction, upgrade, and/or maintenance of a toilet.

The course brings together the latest thinking from around the world and has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. It will equip you with insights and tools on the role of Market-Based Sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services. The course is available as:

  • A free 12-hour online course on the WASH Systems Academy, ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The basics’ that is self-guided and self-paced.
  • On demand the online course can be customised and combined with structured online support, with webinars and group work or as part of a blended approach in a face-to-face training workshop. 
Course objectives

By the end of the training, you will have a good understanding of the role of Market-Based Sanitation as part of strong water and sanitation systems needed to realise universal and sustainable sanitation services. You will know:

  • What Market-Based Sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying Market-Based Sanitation
  • Market-Based Sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems
The WASH Systems Academy

The WASH Systems Academy is collaborative online platform developed to assist water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector professionals with the knowledge and tools to strengthen WASH systems. It now has over 3000 users from 110 countries. It is available on www.washsystemsacademy.org


 

About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments

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USAID      PSi Ethiopia      ONE WASH Ethiopia  Plan International

  SNV     IRC Ethiopia

Blended training for improving market-based sanitation in Ethiopia

28 June 2022 at 09:02

New online course on market-based sanitation tested in blended learning session in Ethiopia.

Participants hard at work during the blended learning session in Bishoftu, Ethiopia

USAID Transform WASH has consistently worked to improve capacity for market-based sanitation in Ethiopia. As part of these efforts, a new online course was developed to introduce virtual learners to the topic. As part of testing the course, from the 10th to the 12th of May 2022, a blended training -- mixing online and in person learning -- was organised in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. The training was joined by 22 people from national and regional government offices (e.g., health and job creation), national training institutes (technical and vocational training centers and the Ethiopian Water Technology Institute), microfinance institutions (savings and credit associations and banks), and development partners.

Participants individually took the 12-hour online course, ‘’Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics,’’ then participated in face-to-face presentations by experts on key content of the online course followed by group discussions. 

Getting to grips with sanitation as a business and learning online

Participants had a very mixed background and level of experience with market-based sanitation. Most had never previously followed an online course. Some struggled on the first day with setting up an account on the online platform to access the course. They needed the support of the facilitators to get started and gain confidence in using the online platform during the first two days.

Participants expressed satisfaction with the mix of in-person support and online coursework. After completing each session, facilitators provided summary presentations, and participants actively joined in discussions. They discussed the implementation of market-based sanitation on the ground and shared best practices from different parts of the country.

After three days of blended training, 20 of the 22 participants completed the online course and earned their certificates. They found the self-study through the online course motivating because it enabled them to visualize their progress. It spurred them on to engage actively with the materials.

Reactions from participants

Participants liked the online content on market-based sanitation, especially experiences from around the globe presented in short texts, videos, and animations. The course provides additional resources as tools and manuals mixed with exercises and reflection in online forum discussions. The presentations by experts brought in more examples from the Ethiopian context, to which they could relate, and helped resolve issues. The lively group discussions allowed for further sharing of experiences with market-based sanitation.

The training developed my confidence. When I passed the tests online and earned the certificate, I felt so proud. I will now continue with other courses on the platform.’ Shitahun Yirsaw, Amhara Cooperative Agency

Participants also felt that using a blended learning approach made it easier to cascade and replicate the training at regional and district levels with their partners. Inviting other colleagues to follow the free online course will make it easier to pass on knowledge than by simply using a training manual.

‘The course taught me that sanitation is an untapped business opportunity for the jobless youths.’ - Dibaba Hordofa, Oromia job creation agency

‘Some of the challenges that I heard from small and micro-enterprises that benefited from the loan we provided for slab manufacturing are like enterprises in other countries, I understood from the course. This gives us confidence in providing loans even if there are problems’ Bati Woldao, the Sinke bank.

About the course Market-based Sanitation: The Basics

This new 12-hour online course brings together the latest thinking from around the world on enabling the private sector to offer more products and services for improved and safely managed household sanitation. It has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. The course aims to equip users with insights and tools on the role of market-based sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services. 

By the end of the course, users will have a good understanding of the role of market-based sanitation as a key component of strong WASH systems, which are needed to realise universal, sustainable sanitation services. Users will know:

  • What market-based sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying market-based sanitation
  • Market-based sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems

The online course is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy and is a self-paced and self-guided course. It can also be used in combination with webinars, group work, on the job support, or part of a 3-day workshop.

The online course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics’ is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy.

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About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments.

Bangladesh gives more attention to WASH in upcoming census

13 June 2022 at 17:46

WASH organisations successfully lobby to include more questions about WASH in the 2022 National Population and Housing Census.

Fieldworker inspects village latrine in Mujaffarabad, Chittagong, Bangladesh

Photo caption: Fieldworker inspects village latrine in Mujaffarabad, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Credit: IRC

Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) is conducting the Bangladesh National Population and Housing Census 2022. The data collection of the census will be done from 15-21 June, 2022. The last population and housing census was carried out in 2011. The census is usually conducted every 10 years. The present one was planned to be held in 2021 but delayed due to COVID-19. This is the first time the national population and housing census of Bangladesh is going to be conducted digitally.

WASH organisations collectively lobbied for BBS to put more focus on WASH issues in the census. Following the recommendations of WASH organisations, BBS has increased the number of WASH related questions in the households questionnaire of the census.

The household questionnaire in its present form has 14 questions. Four of them are related to WASH services. They are:

  • 8. What is the main source of drinking water in the household?
  • 9a.What type of toilet is being used by the household?
  • 9b. Is it for the household only or shared?
  • 9c. What type of handwashing facility is there in the household?

The questionnaire of the 2011 census had only 2 questions on WASH services. They were questions 8 and question 9a. The questions about shared latrines and handwashing facilities are new additions to this year's census.

Moreover, this is the first time BBS officially requested all the WASH organisations and CSOs to help with WASH related information in their respective areas during the data collection of the census. BBS made the request on 1 June 2022 in a letter (in Bengali) addressed to WaterAid, which acts as a representative of WASH organisations and networks in Bangladesh.

Closure report ANAM WASH small grants for CSOs

8 June 2022 at 10:57
By: awumbei

Looking back at the Conrad N. Hilton funded small grants for civil society organisations (CSOs) in Ghana.

Small grant winners and local dignitaries in Asutifi North District, Ghana

In 2021, IRC Ghana in collaboration with the Asutifi North District Assembly/partners with the support of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation instituted the Asutifi North Ahonedie Mpuntuo (ANAM) Small Grant Opportunity for CSOs in Asutifi North District.

This in order to get local civil society involved in the WASH master plan of the district as the role of CSOs is essential in improving WASH service delivery and sustaining water resources. The Small Grant Opportunity, therefore, aimed to support selected organisations with resources to develop advocacy initiatives in the following areas:

  • Sustaining behaviour change in hand hygiene beyond COVID-19
  • Improving access to WASH services for vulnerable and excluded populations including people with disabilities
  • Reduce inequalities in allocation of resources for WASH services
  • Improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services and sustainable Water Resources Management (WRM)
  • Improving gender equity and social inclusion in WASH.

The activities and achievements of the five winners are listed in the closure report (see resources below) as well as recommendations from CSOs to benefit more from grant opportunities like these in the future.

Implementation of the ANAM WASH small grant for CSOs

8 June 2022 at 10:51

This report on the Small Grant Opportunity for CSOs in Asutifi North District in 2021. describes the process, the winners, their achievements and recommendations for similar future grants.

This report about the small grant competition for CSOs n Ghana's Asutifi North District describes the process, the winners, their achievements and recommendations for similar future grants.

Resource mobilisation and implementation strategy of Shashamane WASH master plan

24 May 2022 at 16:01

The strategy document indicates the best ways to mobilise additional finance from the community, government, and partner NGOs.

The general objective of the resource mobilisation and implementation strategy is to provide a clear, and coordinated approach to soliciting, acquiring, and utilising available resources from public funding, development partners, philanthropists, private sector, and communities. This to ensure ensure sustainable resource availability for the implementation of the Shashamane WASH SDG master plan and indicate the pathway to mobilise additional resources necessary to translate the plan into an actionable document.

Appel à candidature pour les petites et moyennes entreprises WASH au Mali

24 May 2022 at 10:44
By: Thera

Soumettez votre candidature avant le 5 juin et saisissez cette opportunité de bénéficier d'une formation et d'un coaching intensifs pour votre entreprise WASH au Mali.

Banner saying Candidature

Le projet Dji Ni Sanya est un programme d’accélération visant à renforcer une dizaine de Petites et Moyennes Entreprises (PMEs) du secteur Eau et Assainissement au Mali. Ce programme, découlant d’un partenariat entre Impact Hub Bamako, Crosswise Works, IRC et financé par Aqua for All, se déroulera jusqu'en mars 2023 et offrira une formation et un coaching intensifs à quatre niveaux: 

  • Compétences Entrepreneuriales
  • Compétences Techniques
  • Accès Au Marché Et Réseau
  • Gestion Financière Et Opérationnelle
 Les critères de sélection

Votre entreprise a :

  • Au moins 2 ans ou plus d’existence ;
  • Un chiffre d’affaires minimum de 6 000 000 CFA par an ;
  • Entre 5 et 50 employés ;
  • Été officiellement enregistrée et est active dans le secteur WASH au Mali.

Tous les candidats doivent être en mesure de prendre part à des sessions de formation et de coaching d’août 2022 à février 2023. L’emploi de temps est estimé à une demi-journée par semaine en moyenne.

Le programme d’accélération vise à renforcer votre entreprise à un niveau ou vous seriez prêts d’accueillir vous-mêmes des investissements. Dji Ni Sanya appuiera les entrepreneurs à établir des plans d’affaires pour leur croissance à la manière professionnelle et mettra les meilleures entreprises en contact avec les investisseurs dans son réseau, à la fin du programme. Vous seriez prêts de vous présenter auprès d’eux !

Une attention particulière est également accordée à l’impact environnemental, au genre et aux conditions d’emploi. Les entrepreneurs seront évalués sur leur potentiel de croissance de leur entreprise.

Les candidatures sont ouvertes jusqu’au dimanche 04 Juin 2022 à minuit GMT. Tous les candidats seront évalués sur la base de leurs réponses dans ce formulaire de candidature, après quoi les entreprises présélectionnées seront contactées pour une interview physique. Le programme démarrera en août 2022 et se poursuivra jusqu’en mars 2023. L’offre de coaching, de soutien financier et d’évaluation sera basée sur les besoins d’apprentissage que vous aurez identifiés.

Les entreprises sélectionnées devront payer des frais de participation de 100.000 CFA par entreprise.

Le programme Dji Ni Sanya est censé faire croître les PME WASH au Mali. Le Fonds mènera à un plan d’investissement concret fondé sur les besoins de financement des entreprises. Chaque entreprise peut accéder à 2 à 5 millions de CFA (+/- 3.000 € / 8.000 €). Le Fonds peut toutefois également être utilisé en partie pour financer une assistance technique supplémentaire qui est définie comme des besoins dans le programme avec les participants soit individuellement ou collectivement, par exemple des activités de formation supplémentaires.

N’attendez plus ! Allez sur le site de https://www.djinisanya.ml/ et postuler pour avoir la chance d’être parmi les 10 PMEs choisies !

NB : Vous pouvez aussi postuler en remplissant la fiche de candidature manuellement disponible au niveau d’Impact Hub et de ses partenaires de diffusion.

Beyond the pandemic: Kabarole champions water and sanitation in healthcare facilities

19 May 2022 at 12:54

This video highlights the WASH in healthcare initiatives implemented in Kabarole District, Uganda in response to COVID-19, but built to last beyond the pandemic.

The one-year COVIDWASH+ project by IRC in Kabarole District, Uganda, initially focused on emergency response to COVID-19 by boosting supplies of personal protective equipment and alcohol-based hand sanitizer for all health-workers. Now looking beyond the pandemic, IRC has expanded to incorporate sustainable WASH in healthcare solutions such as training health workers in the WASH-FIT tool for infection prevention and control, and cleaners to understand their role in preventing the spread of hospital acquired infections.

Medical waste is now well-managed thanks to the first licensed medical waste incinerator constructed at Ruteete HCIV to serve all healthcare facilities in the district. Five selected healthcare facilities have been transformed into model WASH in healthcare facilities that meet the WHO standards; they have received supplies of colour-coded waste segregation bins, installation of piped water systems and clean drinking water at all critical patient care points, and safe inclusive sanitation facilities.

Watch this video and listen to the stories of support staff in healthcare facilities in Kabarole District:

 

IRC WASH Ethiopia launched Agenda for Change district-wide approach project in South Ari Woreda

19 May 2022 at 10:47
By: tsegaye

Commitment from government, NGOs and the communities is needed to implement the WASH master plan in South Ari Woreda.

IRC WASH Ethiopia launched a new project under Agenda for Change intended to build on previous work in South Ari Woreda. IRC WASH Ethiopia has supported South Ari Woreda since 2017 under the Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). During the five-year implementation of SWS, WASH actors in the woreda conducted dozens of learning alliance meetings and developed a WASH SDG master plan. To achieve at least basic WASH service in the woreda by 2030, the master plan identified new WASH infrastructure needed and detailed life-cycle costs to understand what is needed to maintain the existing infrastructure.

Participants at the launch meeting in Jinka, Ethiopia, on 27 April 2022

To implement the master plan and achieve the goals, ETB 1.41 billion (USD 26.9 million) is needed. The Agenda for Change district-wide approach project is aimed at supporting the woreda WASH actors in implementing the master plan through capacity building and strengthening the local WASH systems. The district-wide approach project is being rolled out in Ethiopia and Rwanda with IRC WASH and WaterAid starting their implementation in seven identified woredas and at the national level in Ethiopia.

The project launch was held in Jinka on April 27, 2022, in the presence of South Ari Woreda and South Omo Zone WASH sector office representatives and the South Ari Woreda Head. The need for integration between government, NGOs working in WASH, and the community underlined the event. According to the South Ari Woreda Head, Azmera Wudneh, the project is a good opportunity to integrate the efforts of government, NGOs, and the community and improve the woreda’s WASH status. South Omo Zone’s Water, Mine and Energy Office Head, Workineh Kerma, said that the project will create an opportunity for modern planning, monitoring, and reporting systems in an integrated manner.

After the launch event, a separate discussion was held with the woreda WASH sector offices. They agreed to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with all the WASH actors in the woreda to serve as a reference document throughout project implementation. They also mentioned the need to use the WASH SDG master plan as a foundation document for woreda WASH planning, monitoring, and reporting. The woreda administration, health office, education office, finance office, IRC WASH, and NGOs supporting WASH in the woreda will be signatories of the MoU.

100,000 toilets sold and counting!

12 May 2022 at 15:58

Partnering with Ethiopia's private sector for market-based sanitation.

By Dagim Demirew, WASH Business Development Associate Director, PSI

Local small businesses in Ethiopia play a significant role in flushing away the country’s sanitation woes. The big win: these businesses recently hit a major milestone—selling their 100,000th toilet to a household in Ethiopia. Through two USAID-funded multi-year initiatives, Transform WASH and Feed the Future Growth through Nutrition, Population Services International (PSI) has been supporting these local businesses to introduce a broad range of affordable sanitation products and services to local markets.

Products for sanitation businesses in Ethiopia

What existed before

Prior to the launch of the two projects—Transform WASH in 2017 and Feed the Future Growth through Nutrition (GTN) in 2016— the sanitation market serving rural and peri-urban communities barely existed. Previous ‘sanitation marketing’ projects focused only on selling expensive concrete slabs and largely relied on inexperienced businesses. The product and service offerings were not viable for businesses, were undesirable for many households, and lacked potential for scale.

A new approach

The projects have operated in more than 80 woredas (districts) across 9 regions. Learning quickly that the old approach of focusing on concrete slab manufacturing resulted in low quality products and low sales, the team adapted by expanding delivery models to a range of products and services that suited various customer segments. The team recruited experienced entrepreneurs and business partners, selected based on their interest and capacity, and introduced lower-cost improved sanitation innovations, such as the SATO pan, which automatically seals to eliminate odours and flies.

With the introduction of SATO pans, small businesses and service providers, such as masons, became pivotal players in the supply chain. These actors offered simple upgrades and installation services for existing unimproved toilets. Transform WASH’s basic toilet upgrade model—the most popular among newly introduced models—entails masons conducting door-to-door sales of SATO pan installation services.

Diagram showing toilets sold cumulatively

Getting to 100k toilets

Reaching 100,000 toilets in sales was no easy feat. Besides early challenges with installation quality, the team had to overcome stakeholders’ scepticism about using market-based solutions for public health challenges as well as negative community expectations stemming from a history of projects providing free handouts. Transform WASH and GTN transcended these challenges by focusing on customer needs, flexible business models, and business profitability. WASH sector actors have embraced this success, and Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health and the cross-sectoral One WASH National Programme have incorporated the new approaches into the National Market-Based Sanitation Guideline.

Sales and access to basic sanitation services have also been heavily impacted by both national and global events, including the COVID-19 pandemic and internal conflict. While consistently growing over time, sales trends among project business partners have fluctuated—i.e., alternating rise and fall in sales—as depicted in the chart below.

Diagram showing toilets sold monthly in Ethiopia

During the first three years of market development activities, sales tripled every year, peaking in February 2020. This trend suggested sales would continue increasing until the onset of the rainy season in June. However, sales declined by 150%, from 4,276 in February to 1,700 in April 2020, due to the onset of the pandemic. The toilet market has just recently recovered from the effects of the pandemic.

Supporting market recovery

To support market recovery, PSI-Ethiopia introduced the Decision Quotient (DQ) Sales® method, an approach developed by PSI’s partner, Whitten and Roy Partnership, that helps customers better identify their sanitation problems and the financial and social cost of those problems. Project staff were trained in this approach and in turn built the capacity of business partners, typically mason toilet installers, to use the DQ Sales® approach for executing effective door-to-door promotion and sales. Using this approach, nearly one out of every three households reached with the DQ approach purchased a product and installation service.  

Following the introduction of the DQ Sales® approach, sales rose rapidly from June until November 2020, when the security situation in the Tigray and Benishangul Gumuz regions forced an end to toilet sales in those regions. The expansion of the conflict to the West Oromia and Amhara regions (North and South Wollo) in September 2021 also correlated with a decrease in sales in the following month.

Takeaways

100,000 toilets have given nearly half a million people access to basic sanitation.  This is far from Ethiopia’s goal of achieving universal access, but reaching this milestone proves that, despite significant external challenges and shocks, that market-based sanitation efforts can create a resilient market in Ethiopia that will continue to accelerate toilet sales into the future. 

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About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation. Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Programme, and regional and sub-regional governments.

About Growth through Nutrition

USAID Feed the Future Ethiopia, Growth through Nutrition Activity was a five-year (2016-2021) multisector nutrition and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) project which aimed to improve the nutritional status of women and young children in Ethiopia. The project worked with the Ministries of Agriculture and Livestock; Health; Water, Irrigation, and Energy; and Education at all levels to strengthen institutional capacity and influence policy to improve nutrition. Save the Children led the implementation of the project in collaboration with six international and five local partners. PSI was one of the international partners.

Transform WASH partner logos:

partner logos Transform WASH

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Strategic Plan, Dera Woreda, Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia

9 May 2022 at 11:31

This 12-year costed plan will serve to guide the Dera Woreda's multisectoral WASH activities.

An SDG planning tool was used to align with local and global WASH indicators and to design a plan in collaboration with a planning team comprised of Woreda WASH Team (WWT) and key staff from NGO partners in the woreda and with support from Millennium Water Alliance (MWA) and IRC WASH. This 12-year costed plan will serve to guide the woreda's multisectoral WASH activities. Additional outputs of the model are "consequences" of the plan, such as financial needs and sectoral and institutional requirements. Based on results of monitoring and periodic review meetings, updates and adjustments will be made regularly to the plan.

This document is a draft version.

North Mecha Woreda and Merawi Town 2019 to 2030 West Gojjam Zone, Amhara National Regional State

9 May 2022 at 11:17

A 12-year woreda WASH strategic plan to be implemented in 33 rural and 6 urban kebeles of the woreda.

Cognizant of the need to improve the water supply sanitation and hygiene status of the woreda in line with national and global standards, the need for a long-term strategic plan has been identified. Hence, the Woreda has developed its 12-year woreda WASH strategic plan to be implemented in 33 rural and 6 urban kebeles of the woreda.

This document is a draft version.

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