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Before yesterdayIRC Sanitation

Lead with Problems, End with a Sale

20 September 2022 at 11:05

Raising the "Decision Intelligence" of Sanitation Customers in Ethiopia

We've all heard of IQ, a measure of intelligence, and even EQ for emotional intelligence. But have you heard about DQ, or "decision intelligence?" In business terms, DQ is a customer's capacity to make smart decisions about purchases. For business operators to become good sellers, the capacity to strengthen a customer's DQ is a critical skill. At USAID Transform WASH, we're helping business partners across the country strive for excellence in both the quality of the WASH products and services they offer customers and in how they use the DQ SalesÂź approach to convince customers to buy them.

Discussing sanitation items with households

Discussing sanitation solutions with household 

The DQ Sales¼ approach was developed and is championed by T/WASH’s sales training partner, Whitten & Roy Partnership (WRP), a global sales consultancy that works with Fortune 500 companies and development NGOs alike.  Honed through years of experience working with sales teams to improve results, WRP’s methodology centers on increasing customers’ DQ by engaging in conversations about their problems.  What health issues are you facing?  What is the status of your toilet, and what problems is it causing for you and your family?  Inevitably, people will say that their kids get sick once or twice a year, particularly with bouts of diarrhea that require expensive health clinic visits.  They complain of the smell and flies in their toilets.  Then the seller helps customers calculate the financial costs of those problems.  

T/WASH embraced these sales techniques as part of our strategy to enhance a business model focused on simple, affordable upgrades to existing toilets.  The model requires door-to-door household visits by trained masons and flexible installation packages for a range of latrine types.  To be successful, masons offering quality installation services also need to become motivated sellers and good planners, better prepared for households who say, “No.”  

Results Formula for Motivated DQ Selling 

To achieve DQ Sales¼ results, motivation is a key ingredient.  Its importance is captured in WRP’s “Results Formula” for generating sales success: Results = Attitude + Competence + Executionℱ. 

© 2022 Scott A. Roy and W. Roy Whitten, Ph.D 

The relative strengths of the formula’s components have varying impact on results, as the sliding fulcrum indicates.  The poorer a salesperson’s attitude, the stronger the execution must be to get the same results.  While competence at selling is indispensable across the board, even the most skilled seller will fail to get good results without positive attitude and excellent execution.  We started by strengthening the A – C – E of our own team so that they could successfully train our business partners to do the same.  

 Attitude 

Attitude is key to optimizing results, and it can range widely from a debilitating sense of impossibility to one of unbounded possibility.  Between those poles are factors like whether a job feels like an obligation versus an opportunity.  This is the difference between being reactive and taking charge.  Attitude improves when sellers recognize where they are on this spectrum at any given moment and think through how to elevate their attitude by taking action.  It helps to identify a “deepest desire” behind a job (e.g., “giving my kids the best possible future” or “building a beautiful home”) and use that to motivate daily work. 

Competence 

A set of selling skills, in many cases new to a businessperson, must be developed to excel at the job and improve customers’ DQ.  These include the ability to engage in informal conversations with customers, share examples of neighbors who recently purchased toilets, present new information, and ask open-ended questions that encourage them to share their own stories and problems.  Once customers have identified their pain points, the seller can pose relevant solutions and show how money can be saved over time. 

Execution 

Asking sellers to set their own goals and expand their capacity to achieve them through excellent planning and execution helps them stay encouraged. A few simple calculations can make the difference between demotivation and steady achievement, and attention to simple, focused data can ensure that sellers stay on track and exercise the right amount and type of effort.  First, they set an earnings goal for a month.  Then they estimate a conversion rate (on average, X% of households reached will purchase a product/service).  From that figure and profit margin per unit sold, it’s easy to calculate how many households need to be reached to achieve their earnings goals
and how many days and hours of work will be required each week to get there.  With that level of planning and setting of expectations, the households who say, “No, thanks!” become less discouraging, and practice and experience will only improve the conversion rate and earning potential month-by-month. 

DQ Results 

The development of T/WASH’s “deskilled” business model -- door-to-door sales by mason/installers (MIs) of relatively simple, inexpensive toilet upgrades -- and the addition of DQ, problem-led sales techniques have led to a rapid increase in our number of business partners and their toilet product sales.  To achieve this, the team has used WRP’s Results Formula to concentrate monitoring of partner performance on a few key indicators, such as number of sales presentations per week and sales conversation rate. This made it easy to identify whether and which improvements in attitude, competence, and execution were likely to strengthen sellers’ success with DQ Sales¼.   

Here are some of the key achievements of the program since early 2021, when T/WASH refocused on this MI-led business model and began offering DQ SalesŸ training:   

  • Among all T/WASH construction business partners, MIs have become the largest share at 60% (290 out of 480). 

  • Overall, business partner sales increased by 75% from quarter four of 2021 to quarter two of 2022. 

  • Sales by MIs trained in the DQ approach now comprise about 22% of total sales (in early 2021, it was just five percent), with this figure substantially undercounting MI sales of installation services to households who have purchased products directly from retailers. 

  • The average conversion rate (percentage of households that purchased following an MI sales presentation) stands at a healthy 26%. 

This is the kind of success that we want to sustain and scale.  As a pilot, we customized training for Ethiopia’s Health Extension Program that incorporated elements of the DQ Sales¼ approach into their SBCC activities.  We’re also exploring the possibility of developing similar training programs that can be added to the national TVET (technical and vocational college) curriculum and other business capacity building programs, which have paid scant attention to selling skills as a business necessity for building consumer demand and profitability.   

So clearly, it takes neither high IQ nor EQ to see that DQ gets results! 

 

About Transform WASH 

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation. 
Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market. 

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments. 

Using serious gaming to build water and sanitation capacity

15 September 2022 at 11:03
By: sanchez

Can virtual simulation games be used to build capacities of professionals on strengthening of water, sanitation and hygiene systems?

As an IRC intern, I had three months (June - September 2022) to answer this question. After searching online, in scientific publications and emailing water, sanitation and serious game experts, and conducting interviews with IRC staff and associates, in the end, I found the answer to be: “yes”.

Example of a mock-up simulation on water, sanitation and hygiene system strengthening aimed at professionals

Example of a mock-up simulation on water, sanitation and hygiene system strengthening aimed at professionals

There is great potential in simulation/serious games already being used by educational experts for learning and to create awareness with the general public in a variety of fields, many with proven positive results. Some educators are convinced that serious games are a more effective way to teach their students, up to the university level.

Watch these TED Talks to see how an 8th grade teacher in Denver, Colorado, Jonathon Best and Andre Thomas of Texas A&M University are using serious games.

Sure, but that is just kids and young adults, what about serious professionals?

Well, the health field is moving swiftly to take advantage of the potential of simulation/serious games: for example, SimGame Medical is designed to train medical professionals. Limbs Alive aids patients of all ages in stroke recovery (with rigorous mathematical modelling to track progress). Re-mission, is a serious game for adolescents and young adults who are undergoing cancer therapy and was found to significantly improve treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge; published in Pediatrics. 

These games are having a big impact because they have serious benefits, some of which are: 

1. They provide a non-linear/unidirectional interactive motivational learning experience, they: 

  • Are a preferred learning method for visual learners (which is considered the majority of the population)
  • Check understanding interactively (better than a test, right?)
  • Visualise what has been learned
  • Allows you to learn as you play: "Don't tell me what happens, help me understand it"
  • Gives a sense of progress (advancing levels, attaining badges, etc.) which generally motivates the user to play a longer time when compared to other traditional learning methods

2. They provide the freedom to fail, as:

  • Failing in the game allows you to make better decisions in real life
  • Multiple attempts make it safe to experiment

3. They foster cooperation by:

  • Group bonding that takes place
  • International cooperation in open world games, whereby fostering collective action

4. They allow environments/situations which would otherwise not be possible by:

  • Allowing anyone to explore outer space, the bottom of the ocean, inside the earth, take on a role of CEO or president, etc.
  • Allowing professionals (doctors, drivers, pilots, etc.) virtual training through simulations which reduce cost and risk

5. They provide discussion of sensitive issues/taboos, for example:

  • Corruption, menstrual hygiene, etc.
  • Games, much like art, theatre, etc. show reality in a different way which triggers empathetic and critical thinking in the eyes of the viewer/player

 

So, are they being used in water, sanitation and hygiene?

Non-virtual games are. There are many in-person games made by NGOs for the general public. There are some in-person, role-playing games made by consultants used for the capacity strengthening of professionals on water and sanitation system strengthening (used by Dr. Catarina Fonseca, Dr. Angela Huston, and George de Gooijer, just to name a few). Viva con Agua is developing a board game for training and planning purposes which allows people to appreciate the complexities of water and sanitation service delivery from different perspectives, i.e., government, NGO, community, and private sector.

There are many virtual simulations in the field of water management, sustainable water use, water resource management, urban planning, water contamination, hydrology, stormwater management, etc. What about, more specifically, free games that are available online and aim to build capacity related to water, sanitation and hygiene services? Games that met these criteria were gathered and analysed, finding the following results:

  • All were single players
  • A lot were no longer functional (more commonly PC games than apps)
  • Many are available only as apps (sometimes available on PC but with required download)
  • There is an app compatibility issue: iPhone vs. android apps (some apps are not available for you if you have an iPhone or vice versa)
  • 'User friendliness' is low. For example, some apps do not save automatically and generally feel like low budget games
  • All are for the general public, most are for kids, none are for professionals
  • Most aimed at high income countries for use in their own country or to raise awareness with the general public of realities in low-income countries

Although many consider games to just be appropriate for kids, according to the entertainment software association, the average age of gamers is 33 years and in the serious game that aids in stroke recovery (Limbs Alive), user age was not a problem.

Target audience age

Some may think the reason these games do not exist in low- and middle-income countries is because there may be accessibility and cultural barriers. Well, you might be surprised to find that popular app games like Candy Crush are big in Mali, India and Burkina Faso. In Rwanda, it’s all about the football game apps. What about games for professionals? Well, all of the IRC Capacity Development officers at the IRC country offices agreed that a well-made simulation game on WASH systems would be a useful learning tool. According to the World Bank 2016 report, worldwide, internet is more evenly spread than income. In the words of U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson, “of the world’s seven billion people, about six billion have mobile phones but only about 4.5 billion have access to toilets.” It is therefore no wonder that 94% of the WASH Systems Academy virtual course users of 2022 are from low- and middle-income countries (see graphs below).

Graph showing target audience and income per country Graph showing target audience WASH Systems Academy

How about any free games that are available online and aim to build the capacity of professionals working in water, sanitation and hygiene services?

I did not find any therefore kept searching and after being told “no” by serious game and WASH professionals, I received a reassuring reply by Professor Bruce Lankford, of University of East Anglia, “I think you are on the right track.  It is surprising that there is not something along the lines you are looking for. Well done for spotting this!” When compared to other fields, the water, sanitation and hygiene sector is not using serious games to their full potential Aashna Mittal, serious game PhD researcher in agricultural and urban water management sectors at TU Delft University, agrees.

This seems a missed opportunity, ‘low hanging fruit’ waiting to be picked which could potentially advance the field of water, sanitation and hygiene in a big way. This simulation game could address the capacity gap at a low cost per user as although there is a high upfront cost, there is a low running cost which results in a low cost per person trained. It would be accessible for a very large group of people and for people in situations such as COVID, maternity, etc. with a lower carbon footprint (comparatively, you can only do so many in-person trainings).

So, can virtual simulation games be used to build capacities of professionals on strengthening of water, sanitation, and hygiene systems?

Yes, there are even publications which demonstrate that serious games are successful in building capacities of professionals on system thinking (of more than 10 years ago) Pasin and Giroux, in 2011, stated: “Complex interdependencies of systems can be taught by simulation games more effectively than with traditional learning methods”. More recently, in 2019, Arnold et al. stated: “Simulation games offer a safe space to experiment with system models and provide learning experiences about interdependencies and thus, are considered to foster the development of a deeper understanding of systems".

So, IRC is looking for funding and partnerships to develop a WASH systems simulation game to be used for different purposes; linked to the WASH Systems Academy, stand-alone, in workshops, on-the-job support, with donors etc. Linking the game to the WASH Systems Academy would allow for continued use of the game as the Academy is already running with much success. The WASH systems simulation game should be:

  • Low data (for better accessibility in all country contexts)
  • Able to save automatically
  • Accessible on smart phone as an app and as a PC game with and without download
  • Well made
  • With planned monitoring and evaluation for assessment

Do we know enough about WASH systems to be able to create this simulation? We need to remember that all serious games/simulations are a simplification of reality. It would improve with time. It could work towards an open world game which allows people internationally to cooperate, whereby fostering collective action.

 

List of WASH games

IRC Mali partage ses expériences sur le processus WASH-FIT

13 September 2022 at 17:42

IRC Mali, à travers le projet "santé maternelle et eau potable", a mis en oeuvre le processus WASH-FIT dans les maternités rurales de ses communes d'intervention.

De gauche à droite : Mamane Amadou (World Vision), Hamadoun Dicko (MinistÚre de la Santé et du Développement Social) et Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly (IRC)

Dans le but d’évaluer ses rĂ©alisations dans le cadre du projet ‘’SantĂ© Maternelle et Eau Potable’’, IRC WASH Mali, en collaboration avec World Vision, a organisĂ© un atelier de partage de rĂ©sultats et d’expĂ©riences sur la mise en Ɠuvre du processus WASH-FIT dans les centres de santĂ© des communes de Nossombougou, Ouolodo et Tioribougou dans le cercle de Kolokani, rĂ©gion de Koulikoro. C’était le 30 Juin 2022, Ă  l’hĂŽtel Onomo de Bamako.

Chaque annĂ©e, plus d’un million de dĂ©cĂšs sont liĂ©s Ă  des accouchements faits dans des mauvaises conditions d’hygiĂšne. Au mĂȘme moment, 26% de mortalitĂ©s nĂ©onatales et 11% de mortalitĂ©s maternelles sont imputables aux infections. Le Mali n’est pas en marge de cette rĂ©alitĂ©. C’est pourquoi depuis 2016, IRC WASH, en partenariat avec World Vision, mĂšne des activitĂ©s stratĂ©giques au Mali pour accompagner les efforts du gouvernement dans l’accĂšs des populations aux services eau potable, hygiĂšne et assainissement (WASH).

Ainsi depuis 2017, IRC WASH accompagne des structures de santĂ© dans les communes de Nossombougou, Ouolodo et Tioribougou dans l’élaboration de plans stratĂ©giques communaux WASH pour l’atteinte de l’ODD6 Ă  horizon 2030. Ces plans stratĂ©giques communaux WASH 2018-2030, accompagnĂ©s de plans d’investissements pour chacune des trois communes concernĂ©es, s’élĂšve Ă  un budget global de 8 milliards, dont 3. 911. 050. 000 F CFA pour Nossombougou; 1. 663. 880. 000 F CFA pour Ouolodo et 2. 588. 150. 000 F CFA pour Tioribougou.

Selon la Direction pays de IRC WASH, Mme TraorĂ© Afou Chantal Bengaly, IRC WASH Ă  travers ces plans d’actions, a effectuĂ© de grandes rĂ©alisations dans ces trois communes du cercle de Kolokani. Cela, autour de quatre (04) axes stratĂ©giques qui sont : ‘’Accroissement de la performance institutionnelle de la mairie ; AccĂšs universel Ă  des services continus et amĂ©liorĂ©s d’eau potable ; AccĂšs universel Ă  des services continus et adĂ©quats d’assainissement et Renforcement des capacitĂ©s de participation citoyenne’’

De grandes réalisations !

Mme TraorĂ© Afou Chantal Bengaly a Ă©galement prĂ©cisĂ© que ces plans stratĂ©giques soutenus pour le moment par IRC WASH, World Vision et d’autres partenaires ont permis la rĂ©alisation de plusieurs points d’eau dans les zones d’interventions. Il s’agit de 10 adductions d’eau sommaire ; 11 forages Ă©quipĂ©s de PMH 3 SystĂšmes d’hydrauliques villageois amĂ©liorĂ©s et 01 Adduction de site maraicher. « Depuis novembre 2020, cette collaboration IRC – World Vision assure aussi la mise en Ɠuvre du projet pilote intitulĂ© ‘’Eau potable et santĂ© maternelle’’ avec l’accompagnement du Centre de SantĂ© de RĂ©fĂ©rence de Kolokani et les mairies de Nossombougou, Ouolodo et de Tioribougou. Ce projet, financĂ© par la Fondation de la Loterie SuĂ©doise, vise Ă  assurer l’accĂšs Ă  l’eau potable et Ă  l’assainissement dans les centres de santĂ© et Ă  mettre en Ɠuvre des changements efficaces qui produisent des amĂ©liorations de la santĂ© Ă  travers le processus WASH – FIT », a-t-elle expliquĂ©.

Selon la Direction pays de IRC WASH, neuf (9) centres de santĂ© dont trois (3) centres de santĂ© communautaires et (6) maternitĂ©s rurales des trois communes ont bĂ©nĂ©ficiĂ© de ce projet pilote. « GrĂące aux efforts de World Vision et d’IRC WASH, plus de 80 % de ces centres de santĂ© sont dotĂ©s d’infrastructure d’Eau. Aussi, avec l’accompagnement d’IRC WASH et de World Vision, chacune de ces maternitĂ©s dispose dĂ©sormais d’un plan d’amĂ©lioration des services WASH et d’une Ă©quipe WASH – FIT qui veille Ă  l’exĂ©cution de ce plan. Nous notons Ă©galement un progrĂšs significatif dans la gestion de ces structures grĂące aux activitĂ©s de renforcement de capacitĂ©s sur la mise en Ɠuvre de l’outil WASH – FIT auxquels ont pris part les agents de santĂ© et les acteurs WASH », souligne-t-elle.

Mme TraorĂ© Afou Chantal Bengaly estime Ă©galement que de nos jours, neuf plans de gestion de santĂ© et environnement communĂ©ment appelĂ© ‘’Plans WASH – Fit’’ sont fonctionnels et suivis par le centre de santĂ© de rĂ©fĂ©rence de Kolokani avec l’accompagnĂ© de World Vision et d’IRC WASH Mali. Au total, 24 personnes sont formĂ©es sur la PrĂ©vention – ContrĂŽle des Infections et les techniques WASH, dont 3 Directeurs techniques de Centre, 3 infirmiers ou infirmiĂšres, 6 matrones et 12 volontaires villageois aidant Ă  entretenir les maternitĂ©s rurales.

Des défis à relever !

Cependant, la Direction pays de IRC WASH note que, malgrĂ© les nombreuses rĂ©alisations, les dĂ©fis persistent quant Ă  l’atteinte de l’ODD6. Parmi ces dĂ©fis, il faut citer, selon elle, l’accompagnement financier des autoritĂ©s et les partenaires au dĂ©veloppement aux maternitĂ©s rurales qui ne font pas partie de la pyramide sanitaire du Mali ; la mise Ă  l’échelle du pays de l’outil WASH-FIT ; la mise en Ɠuvre du plan d’action national sur la rĂ©solution de l’Organisation Mondiale de la SantĂ© (OMS) sur le WASH en milieu de soins, etc.

Pour sa part, Mamane Amadou, Wash Senior Manager Ă  World Vision, a estimĂ© que la question Wash est Ă  la base de tout dĂ©veloppement et que ces services ne doivent pas ĂȘtre un luxe, mais plutĂŽt un droit.

Les autoritĂ©s s’engagent aux cĂŽtĂ©s d’IRC et de World Vision !

 Dans son discours d’ouverture, le reprĂ©sentant du ministre de la SantĂ© et du dĂ©veloppement social, Hamadoun Dicko, a apprĂ©ciĂ© l’initiative Ă  sa juste valeur, d’autant plus qu’elle s’aligne avec les aspirations et les prioritĂ©s des plus hautes autoritĂ©s du Mali traduites Ă  travers la politique sectorielle de santĂ© et de population basĂ©e sur la dĂ©centralisation de l’accĂšs aux soins et la participation communautaire. Aussi, le reprĂ©sentant du ministre de la SantĂ© et du dĂ©veloppement social estime que l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiĂšne Ă©tant prĂ©alable pour des soins de qualitĂ©, et particuliĂšrement pour des accouchements sans risque, de nombreuses personnes sont exposĂ©es aux risques de contamination quand elles se rendent dans des centres de santĂ© surtout ruraux.

Selon lui, l’organisation de cet atelier dont l’objectif gĂ©nĂ©ral vise le partage d’expĂ©rience d’IRC WASH, de World Vision sur la mise en Ɠuvre de l’approche WASH-FIT, vient Ă  point nommĂ© et soutient l’engagement manifeste du Gouvernement de la transition pour accroitre l’accĂšs des services sociaux de base, en particulier l’accĂšs Ă  l’eau, l’hygiĂšne et l’assainissement. « Je puis vous assurer que le Gouvernement de la transition Ă  travers le MinistĂšre de la SantĂ© et du DĂ©veloppement social continuera Ă  vous apporter tout l’accompagnement requis vous permettant une meilleure atteinte des objectifs que vous vous fixez lors de vos appuis multiples et multiformes aux populations du Mali », a-t-il rassurĂ©.

Pour rappel, le processus WASH-FIT est une mĂ©thode axĂ©e sur les risques, comportant une sĂ©rie d’outils permettant d’amĂ©liorer les services d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiĂšne de façon continue, dans le cadre de l’objectif plus vaste de perfectionnement des Ă©tablissements de soins de santĂ©.  Un cadre qui a permis de prĂ©senter une note d’information gĂ©nĂ©rale sur les actions entreprises et de faire l’état des progrĂšs afin de se projeter dans les perspectives.

Amadou Kodio/Afrikinfos-Mali

IRC Mali officialise son partenariat avec ses communes focus

6 September 2022 at 14:36
By: Thera

La Directrice Pays d'IRC Mali rend visite aux communes d'intervention pour renforcer le partenariat en vue d'atteindre l'ODD6 d'ici 2030.

IRC depuis 2018 en collaboration avec World Vision intervient dans les communes rurales de Nossombougou, Ouolodo et Tioribougou pour renforcer les systĂšmes WASH dans les Ă©coles et les centres de santĂ©. Depuis son enregistrement officiel en tant qu’ONG internationale au Mali en 2021, IRC Mali s’est donnĂ©e comme mission d’officialiser son partenariat avec les communes d’intervention par la signature d’un protocole d’accord avec les maries des trois communes. Une mission d’IRC WASH Mali composĂ© de la Directrice Pays Dr Afou Chantal Bengaly TraorĂ©, de l’expert junior WASH Mohamed KanĂ© et de la ChargĂ©e de Communication Sanata ThĂ©ra s’est rendue dans lesdites communes ce vendredi 19 aoĂ»t 2022 pour la signature des dits protocoles et la remise d’un chĂšque symbolique d’une valeur de 500 000 FCFA (740 USD) Ă  chacune des mairies pour soutenir le service municipal de l’eau et l’assainissement en place.

La mission s’est d’abord rendue dans la commune de Tioribougou oĂč elle a rencontrĂ© le maire Moussa Diarra. AprĂšs quelques Ă©changes sur la situation sĂ©curitaire de la zone, la directrice pays de l’IRC WASH Mali a soulignĂ© l’importance de ce protocole d’accord qui facilitera le partenariat entre l’ONG et la mairie mais aussi la mobilisation de ressources pour soutenir le Plan StratĂ©gique communal WASH afin d’atteindre l’ODD6. Les deux parties ont signĂ© le protocole et la Directrice Pays de l’IRC WASH Mali a remis le chĂšque symbolique au service municipal d’eau et d’assainissement (SMEA). Chaque agent SMEA sera dotĂ© d’un cahier de charge quant Ă  l’utilisation de ce fond pour le bon fonctionnement du service.

 Photo : M. le maire de Tioribougou Moussa Diarra et la Directrice Pays de l’IRC WASH Mali Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly

Photo : M. le maire de Tioribougou Moussa Diarra et la Directrice Pays de l'IRC WASH Mali Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly 

La mission s’est ensuite rendue dans la commune de Ouolodo oĂč elle fut accueillie par la secrĂ©taire gĂ©nĂ©rale Mme Youma TraorĂ© et l’agent SMEA Welekoro TraorĂ©. Comme Ă  Tioribougou, la Directrice Pays a expliquĂ© le but de cette dĂ©marche qui vise surtout Ă  pĂ©renniser les efforts d’IRC WASH Mali pour le renforcement des systĂšmes WASH dans ses communes d’intervention. Soucieuse de l’avancĂ©e de l’ODD6 dans la commune, elle s’est aussi enquise de la situation globale des services. Selon Mme Youma TraorĂ©, la commune a connu un progrĂšs Ă©norme quant Ă  la couverture en service WASH prĂ©cisĂ©ment l'approvisionnement en eau potable.

 

Photo : Youma Traoré, secrétaire général de la maire de Ouolodo

Elle confesse en ces mots « avant, nous creusions des puits pour avoir de l’eau qui n’était pas vraiment potable. Avec l’aide d’IRC WASH Mali et de World Vision, nous avons pu Ă©laborer notre plan stratĂ©gique communal WASH duquel nous dĂ©duisons chaque annĂ©e un plan de travail budgĂ©tisĂ© (PTAB). Ce PTAB nous a permis d’attirer d’autres potentiels partenaires techniques et financiers et de mobiliser des fonds pour la construction de nouveaux points d’eau amĂ©liorĂ©s notamment dans les Ă©coles et les centres de santĂ©. Cependant il reste beaucoup Ă  faire dans le domaine de l’assainissement ».

Photo : Youma Traoré, secrétaire général de la maire de Ouolodo

La visite s’est terminĂ©e dans la commune de Nossombougou oĂč la mission a payĂ© une visite de courtoisie au sous-prĂ©fet du cercle de Kolokani avant de rencontrer les agents municipaux. Dr. Afou Chantal a rencontrĂ© le sous-prĂ©fet Mme Diarra Djeneba Kemesso qui fut rassurĂ©e des bonnes intentions d’IRC WASH Mali Ă  amĂ©liorer les services WASH dans les trois communes.

Photo : Mohamed Kané, Diarra Djeneba Kemesso et Afou Chantal Bengaly
Photo : Mohamed Kané, Diarra Djeneba Kemesso et Afou Chantal Bengaly

A la mairie de Nossombougou, la mission a rencontrĂ© le premier adjoint au maire M. Sidy Diarra, l’agent SMEA Gaoussou Dabo et le secrĂ©taire gĂ©nĂ©ral Salif TraorĂ©. Selon M. Diarra, cet accord est une bonne initiative et permet de mieux dĂ©finir les rĂŽles et les responsabilitĂ©s de chaque partie dans le partenariat.

Photo : 1ere ligne, Sidi Diarra, Afou chantal Bengaly, Sanata Théra, Salif Traoré ; 2Úme ligne, Gaoussou Dabo et Mohamed Kané
Photo : 1ere ligne, Sidi Diarra, Afou chantal Bengaly, Sanata Théra, Salif Traoré ; 2Úme ligne, Gaoussou Dabo et Mohamed Kané

Cette visite a aussi permis d’acquĂ©rir des informations sur le statut d’exĂ©cution du Plan StratĂ©gique communal WASH. De 2018 Ă  nos jours, les trois communes sont Ă  plus de 90% en matiĂšre d’accĂšs Ă  l’eaupotable. Six maternitĂ©s rurales ont Ă©tĂ© couvertes par IRC et son partenaire World Vision. Cependant il reste deux maternitĂ©s dont une Ă  Ouolodo et une Ă  Nossombougou qui ne sont pas approvisionnĂ©es. Quelques hameaux devenus maintenant des villages dans ces zones ne sont toujours pas servis. GrĂące Ă  la prĂ©sence de nouveaux partenaires, la commune de Nossombougou entend rĂ©ceptionner de nouveaux points d’eau amĂ©liorĂ© notamment le village de Ouarala.

Commune de Kornaka : mise en oeuvre du processus WASH FIT

29 August 2022 at 17:54
By: Ousmane

Déclenchement du processus WASH FIT dans six centres de santé de la commune.

En 2015 les Nations Unies ont adoptĂ© les Objectifs de DĂ©veloppement Durable (ODD) qui sont « un appel mondial Ă  agir pour Ă©radiquer la pauvretĂ©, protĂ©ger la PlanĂšte et faire en sorte que tous les ĂȘtres humains vivent dans la paix et la prospĂ©ritĂ© d’ici Ă  2030 ». L’objectif n°6 vise Ă  « garantir l’accĂšs de tous Ă  l’eau et Ă  l’assainissement et assurer une gestion durable des ressources en eau ». C’est dans cette optique que le Niger Ă  travers le MinistĂšre de l’Hydraulique et de l’Assainissement a Ă©laborĂ© avec l’appui de ses Partenaires Techniques et Financiers le « Programme Eau, HygiĂšne et Assainissement pour la pĂ©riode 2016-2030, (PROSEHA) ». L’objectif entre autres est d’ici 2030 que tous les mĂ©nages, les Ă©coles, les formations sanitaires et les autres lieux de vie aient accĂšs Ă  des services basiques d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiĂšne.

C’est en ce sens que IRC s’est engagĂ© Ă  assister la commune de Kornaka et de mettre en Ɠuvre l’approche WASH FIT dans six centres de santĂ© de la commune afin d’amĂ©liorer la fourniture des services WASH dans ces centres. Le processus WASH FIT est une mĂ©thode axĂ©e sur les risques, comportant une sĂ©rie d'outils permettant d'amĂ©liorer les services d'eau, d'assainissement et d'hygiĂšne de façon continue, dans le cadre de l'objectif plus vaste de perfectionnement des Ă©tablissements de soins de santĂ©. Il est destinĂ© Ă  de petits Ă©tablissements de soins de santĂ© primaire.

 Afin que le processus WASH FIT puisse ĂȘtre mis en Ɠuvre correctement, un atelier de formation des responsables de ces six centres de santĂ© a Ă©tĂ© tenu du 22 au 23 juillet 2022 au niveau de la commune.

Les principaux points que l’on peut retenir de l’atelier sont :

  • Toutes les Ă©tapes du processus WASH FIT ont Ă©tĂ© prĂ©sentĂ©es aux participants. Les implications de chaque Ă©tape aussi ont Ă©tĂ© prĂ©sentĂ©es et dĂ©battues ;
  • Les normes WASH dans un Ă©tablissement de soins de santĂ© ont Ă©galement Ă©tĂ© prĂ©sentĂ©es aux participants. L’audience a beaucoup apprĂ©ciĂ© ce point car les responsables des centres de santĂ© se sont rendus compte qu’une bonne partie des normes WASH ne sont pas connues et/ou appliquĂ©es ;
  • La prĂ©sentation des normes WASH dans un centre de santĂ© a permis aux participants de voir les dĂ©fis Ă  relever pour amĂ©liorer les services WASH dans leur Ă©tablissement ;
  • L’implication de l’autoritĂ© communale. Le maire de la commune M. Tsahirou Alassane a mis l’accent sur le fait que l’engagement et le leadership des responsables des centres de santĂ© sont indispensables pour la rĂ©ussite de la mise en Ɠuvre du processus. Il les a appelĂ©s Ă  s’impliquer malgrĂ© les dĂ©fis et qu’ils ont un rĂŽle important dans l’amĂ©lioration des services WASH dans leur Ă©tablissement.

Participants à l'atelier (autorités communales et les responsables des centres de santé)

AprĂšs l’atelier de formation, le processus WASH FIT a Ă©tĂ© dĂ©clenchĂ© dans les six centres de santĂ©. Une Ă©quipe WASH FIT a Ă©tĂ© mise en place dans chaque Ă©tablissement et ensuite l’évaluation des indicateurs WASH FIT a Ă©tĂ© menĂ©e conjointement avec les membres de l’équipe. Cette Ă©valuation a permis de dĂ©celer pour chaque Ă©tablissement les indicateurs Ă  corriger afin d’amĂ©liorer la situation WASH. Si globalement ces centres de santĂ© prĂ©sentent une situation assez satisfaisante en matiĂšre d’approvisionnement en eau potable, les sous domaines assainissement, gestion des dĂ©chets mĂ©dicaux, hygiĂšne, nettoyage de l’environnement et gestion de l’établissement prĂ©sentent des indicateurs qui ne sont pas globalement en adĂ©quation avec les normes.

Mise en place de l’équipe WASH FIT (case de santĂ© de Maski)

La prochaine Ă©tape, IRC, le service municipal eau et assainissement et l’équipe WASH FIT de chaque Ă©tablissement vont dĂ©finir et hiĂ©rarchiser les domaines d’amĂ©lioration et ensuite Ă©laborer un plan d’amĂ©lioration. Les Ă©quipes WASH FIT avec le soutien de la communautĂ© ont pris l’engagement de participer Ă  l’amĂ©lioration de la situation WASH de leur Ă©tablissement. 

Evaluateurs des indicateurs WASH FIT

Tenkodogo, the road to SDG6

26 July 2022 at 10:15
By: Zohoun

IRC has produced a video that highlights the progress made so far in the implementation of Tenkodogo's WASH strategic plan, with support from the LDSC Foundation.

Tenkodogo, the road to SDG 6

Drinking water, hygiene and sanitation services are equally important. The Tenkodogo municipal authorities decided to develop a Water, Hygiene and Sanitation Master Plan to make drinking water, toilets and good hygiene practices available to all the inhabitants of the district. Even before the plan was finalised, IRC and the Latter-day Saints Charities (LDSC) Foundation decided to support the commune in relieving the urgent needs of the population in this area.

ONEA worker

This has led to several extraordinary results. In urban areas, 580 families now have drinking water in their homes through a private ONEA connection. In rural areas, a feasibility study was carried out in 10 villages to upgrade the current hand pumps, which are unable to meet their water needs, to more solid and efficient installations that can serve 2,614 people as soon as they are completed. Through the "Clean Hands, Good Health" campaign, 7,684 pupils now regularly wash their hands with soap and water and are protected from diseases related to dirty hands. Local radio stations were also used to reach as many people as possible. Local authorities and staff were trained to increase their ownership of the process.

As images are a very effective way to show the evidence, a 6-minute video was produced to show the progress. The film shows the main changes observed with lively testimonies from beneficiaries and authorities. Fatimata Oubda describes her satisfaction and relief at being able to get clean water from a tap at home. The chore of fetching water is now a distant memory and she also has more time to take care of her family. Prosper Zombra, principal of Gogare A school in Tenkodogo and Florentine Kouti, teacher at Tenkodogo Centre A school proudly describe the remarkable changes in their students' hand hygiene behaviour. Hamadou Dicko, Secretary General of Tenkodogo, mentioned the good collaboration with all the actors, which has been a considerable asset for obtaining results.

The efforts are considerable and already constitute a success, but there is still a long way to go. 420 vulnerable households are still not connected to the private ONEA network in the urban area, 22614 inhabitants of surrounding villages urgently need drinking water and 168 schools with 29594 pupils are still to be reached in terms of hand hygiene awareness.

The populations' dearest wish is that the actions be extended to all levels for an effective scaling up. According to Albert Koumsongo, Regional Director of Water and Sanitation for the Centre East, this programme must be extended to all the communes of Burkina Faso to boost the access rate.

 

Tenkodogo, la marche vers l’ODD6

26 July 2022 at 09:46
By: Zohoun

IRC a produit un film de capitalisation qui souligne les progrĂšs rĂ©alisĂ©s jusqu'Ă  prĂ©sent dans la mise en Ɠuvre anticipĂ©e du plan stratĂ©gique WASH de Tenkodogo, avec le soutien de la fondation LDSC

Les services d’eau potable, d’hygiĂšne et d’assainissement sont aussi primordiaux l’un que l’autre.  Les autoritĂ©s communales de Tenkodogo avaient dĂ©cidĂ© d’élaborer un plan stratĂ©gique Eau – HygiĂšne et Assainissement afin de mettre l’eau potable, les toilettes et les bonnes pratiques d’hygiĂšne Ă  la disposition de tous les habitants de la commune. Avant mĂȘme la finalisation de ce plan, IRC et la fondation Latter-day Saints Charities (LDSC) ont dĂ©cidĂ© d’appuyer la commune Ă  soulager les besoins urgents des populations en la matiĂšre. Cela a permis d’engranger plusieurs rĂ©sultats extraordinaires. En milieu urbain, 580 familles ont maintenant l’eau potable sur place Ă  leur domicile Ă  travers un branchement privĂ© ONEA. Quant au milieu rural, une Ă©tude de faisabilitĂ© a Ă©tĂ© rĂ©alisĂ©e dans 10 villages pour la mise Ă  niveau des pompes manuelles actuelles incapables de rĂ©pondre Ă  leurs besoins en eau en des installations plus solides et plus efficaces pouvant desservir 22614 personnes dĂšs leur rĂ©alisation. 

A travers la campagne « Mains propres, bonne santĂ© », 7684 Ă©lĂšves se lavent dĂ©sormais rĂ©guliĂšrement les mains Ă  l’eau et au savon et sont protĂ©gĂ©s contre les maladies liĂ©es aux mains sales. Les radios locales ont Ă©galement Ă©tĂ© utilisĂ©es pour Ă©tendre la campagne Ă  l’échelle de toute la population et toucher le plus de personnes que possibles. Les autoritĂ©s et le personnel communal ont Ă©tĂ© formĂ©s pour leur meilleure appropriation du processus. 

L’image Ă©tant un moyen trĂšs efficace pour montrer les Ă©vidences, un film de 6 minutes a Ă©tĂ© produit pour rendre plus visible les progrĂšs rĂ©alisĂ©s sur le terrain. Le film montre les principaux changements observĂ©s avec des tĂ©moignages vivants des bĂ©nĂ©ficiaires et des autoritĂ©s. Fatimata Oubda nous dĂ©crit sa satisfaction et son soulagement de pouvoir obtenir de l'eau potable Ă  partir d'un robinet chez elle Ă  la maison. La corvĂ©e d’eau est dĂ©sormais un lointain souvenir et elle dispose Ă©galement de plus de temps pour s’occuper de sa famille.

Prosper Zombra, directeur de l'Ă©cole Gogare A Ă  Tenkodogo et Florentine Kouti, enseignante Ă  l’école Tenkodogo centre A dĂ©crivent fiĂšrement les changements remarquables dans le comportement de leurs Ă©lĂšves en matiĂšre d'hygiĂšne des mains. Le secrĂ©taire gĂ©nĂ©ral de la mairie de Tenkodogo, Hamadou Dicko a rappelĂ© la bonne collaboration avec l’ensemble des acteurs, qui a Ă©tĂ© un atout considĂ©rable pour l'obtention de rĂ©sultats. 

Les efforts sont considĂ©rables et constituent dĂ©jĂ  une rĂ©ussite, mais il y a encore du chemin Ă  parcourir.  420 mĂ©nages vulnĂ©rables ne sont toujours pas raccordĂ©s au rĂ©seau privĂ© ONEA dans la zone urbaine, 22614 habitants des villages rattachĂ©s ont urgemment d’eau potable et 168 Ă©coles avec 29594 Ă©lĂšves restent Ă  atteindre en matiĂšre de sensibilisation Ă  l'hygiĂšne des mains.

Le vƓu le plus cher des populations, est que les actions soient Ă©tendues Ă  tous les niveaux pour un passage Ă  l’échelle efficace. Selon le directeur rĂ©gional de l’eau et assainissement du Centre Est, Albert Koumsongo, ce programme doit ĂȘtre Ă©tendu Ă  l’ensemble des communes du Burkina Faso pour booster le taux d’accĂšs.

Smart and targeted subsidies for sanitation and hygiene in Ethiopia

18 July 2022 at 09:02

The Federal Ministry of Health in Ethiopia has drawn up a sanitation subsidy protocol to address the sanitation needs of the poorest segment of the population

By Ekram Redwan, Director of Hygiene and Environmental Health, Ministry of Health

The Federal Ministry of Health (MoH) is committed to improving the sanitation, hygiene, and environmental health conditions of its citizens. In the second health sector transformation plan, the MoH has planned to increase the proportion of households with access to basic sanitation services from 20% (2019) to 60% (2025) through an effective and sustainable market-based system for hygiene, sanitation, and environmental health facilities and services. The ultimate goal is universal coverage by 2030 in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). To accomplish these goals, the Ministry and development partners are working to expand sanitation marketing centres to districts to ensure access to improved sanitation products.

The National multi stakeholder platform participants with the state minister of the MoH Dr. Dereje Duguma, after the launching of the sanitation subsidy protocol, photo by Tsegaye Yeshiwas

Parallel to increasing access, the Ministry explored different financing options to ensure services for all segments of the population. The initiation of a subsidy scheme to address the sanitation needs of the poorest segment of the population is one of the proposed financing options. Accordingly, the Ministry has prepared a subsidy protocol to guide the design and implementation of a smart and targeted sanitation subsidy.

In Ethiopia inequalities in sanitation and hygiene coverage exist based on, among other factors, geography and socioeconomic status. The subsidy protocol is designed to be smart and targeted. It is smart so that it does not distort or hamper market-based sanitation or Community-Led Total Sanitation and Hygiene approaches. In addition, it is targeted to address the most vulnerable population groups who are not able to construct improved sanitation facilities on their own due to their extreme poverty and/or impending environmental factors. 

The subsidy is intended to target households that are not able to afford sanitation products through other means, and the identification of households is planned to be made in line with existing poverty alleviation programmes. The latrine improvements/construction will be delivered by the private sector; therefore, the programme will focus on areas with a well-established supply chain to support existing businesses and reduce costs. Additionally, areas where it is difficult and costly to construct a latrine and areas with internally displaced communities and refugees will be targeted. 

Implementers are required to comply with the five guiding principles outlined in the sanitation subsidy protocol:

  1. subsidies must be well-targeted,
  2. subsidies should only target latrine sub-structures,
  3. subsidies should only cover a proportion of the overall cost,
  4. subsidies should be prioritised in places with a well-established supply chain,
  5. these guiding principles apply to all stakeholders.

All stakeholders are encouraged to start piloting the sanitation protocol and share their learning with the MoH and the broader WASH community to further refine and strengthen of the sanitation subsidy protocol.

The National sanitation subsidy protocol can be accessed under 'more info' left.


About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments.

 

National sanitation subsidy protocol

18 July 2022 at 09:11

A protocol prepared to enable Ethiopia to achieve its goal of attaining Sustainable Development Goal 6.2 - universal access to basic sanitation services by 2030 and Health Sector Transformation Plan II goals by 2025.

This subsidy protocol is prepared to enable Ethiopia to achieve its goal of attaining Sustainable Development Goal 6.2 - universal access to basic sanitation services by 2030 and Health Sector Transformation Plan II goals by 2025.

The protocol specifies a clear rationale for the need to subsidize sanitation, provides guiding principles, and proposes modalities (i.e., selection criteria for beneficiaries and delivery mechanisms) for implementing sanitation subsidies in Ethiopia. The protocol gives special weight to two important features of a subsidy: smart and targeted.

A smart sanitation subsidy does not distort or hamper market-based sanitation and Community-Led Total Sanitation and Hygiene (CLTSH) approaches, but rather contributes to the expansion thereof. A targeted sanitation subsidy specifically addresses the most vulnerable population groups who are not able to construct improved sanitation facilities on their own due to their extreme poverty and/or impending environmental factors.

Finally, the Federal Ministry of Health is fully committed to making sure this protocol is used by all sanitation, hygiene, and environmental health stakeholders, and calls upon the private sector, entrepreneurs, and development partner organizations to use this protocol consistently for the improvement of sanitation, hygiene, and environmental health facilities and services across the country.

Avis de recrutement pour IRC Mali

14 July 2022 at 13:36

Avis de recrutement -banner

Charge (e) de programme Gouvernance AEPHA au Mali - Chef de mission du projet renforcement des capacités en gouvernance communale des services sociaux de base

IRC (Centre International de Reference pour l’Eau et l’Assainissement) est une organisation internationale non gouvernementale à but non lucratif, qui travaille en collaboration avec les gouvernements, les ONG, ou des personnes partout dans le monde afin de trouver des solutions à long terme à la crise mondiale des services d'approvisionnement en eau, d'assainissement et d'hygiùne.

IRC opĂšre Ă  l'Ă©chelle internationale avec des bureaux Ă  La Haye, au Ghana, au Burkina Faso, en Éthiopie, en Ouganda et au Mali avec des programmes en Inde, Honduras, Rwanda et au Niger.

Nous recherchons actuellement des candidats expérimentés pour le poste de :

Charge (e) de programme Gouvernance AEPHA au Mali - Chef de mission du projet renforcement des capacités en gouvernance communale des services sociaux de base

RattachĂ© Ă  la Directrice Pays d’IRC au Mali, le (la) ChargĂ© (e) de programme Gouvernance AEPHA (approvisionnement en eau potable, hygiĂšne et assainissement) mettra en Ɠuvre des projets et programmes au Mali. Il (elle) sera responsable de la planification, la gestion, la mise en Ɠuvre, la coordination et l’établissement de rapports sur l’exĂ©cution des projets Ă  sa charge.

Entre autres tùches spécifiques, il (elle) veillera à une exécution opportune et effective des projets existants, à organiser et à participer à des ateliers de formation, à assurer la liaison avec les donateurs, le gouvernement, les partenaires et les consultants, à faire/diriger la recherche thématique, à préparer et éditer des rapports et à apporter son assistance dans la préparation des plans de projet.

Principales responsabilités et attributions

La mise en Ɠuvre et la coordination de l’exĂ©cution des programmes et projets :

  • L’élaboration, le dĂ©veloppement et l’exĂ©cution de plans stratĂ©giques ;
  • Le dĂ©veloppement et l’exĂ©cution de plans de travail du programme annuel ;
  • L’assistance des partenaires dans le dĂ©veloppement et la mise en Ɠuvre de stratĂ©gies de plaidoyer et de campagnes nationales/rĂ©gionales ;
  • L’organisation et la facilitation d’ateliers de renforcement des capacitĂ©s avec les partenaires ;
  • La supervision du travail des Assistants de programme et des Consultants ;
  • Assurer la coordination et la gestion administrative et financiĂšre de la mise en Ɠuvre du projet renforcement des capacitĂ©s de trois communes en gestion des services sociaux de base (AEPHA, santĂ© et Ă©ducation) ;
  • Assurer la reprĂ©sentation d’IRC dans les instances de concertations et de dialogues dans les communes et rĂ©gions concernĂ©es au Mali ;
  • La rĂ©daction et l’édition des rapports des projets ;
  • La rĂ©daction de rapport pour le(s) donateur(s) pour les gouvernements.

Maintenir un contact régulier avec les autres membres du personnel du programme, les donateurs, les partenaires et les consultants du programme et du projet.

Aider Ă  la mobilisation de fonds et au DĂ©veloppement du Programme Pays :
  • Contribuer Ă  la formulation de proposition, Ă  l’élaboration de documents de conception, de calendriers et plans de travail ;
  • Assister aux rencontres avec les parties prenantes (financement et mise en Ɠuvre) pour discuter et dĂ©velopper des interventions conjointes ;
  • Assister aux rencontres de collecte de fonds et de nĂ©gociation ;
  • Aider dans l’identification de nouvelles opportunitĂ©s de financement et de partenariat.

Contribution au Programme global de travail d’IRC, notamment par :

  • Le traitement des requĂȘtes et la fourniture d’informations sur le Programme ;
  • La participation et l’assistance aux rĂ©unions et autres activitĂ©s du Programme ;
  • L’élaboration et la conservation des dossiers et des systĂšmes d’information du Programme ;
  • L’appui Ă  l’élaboration des accords de partenariat avec les partenaires stratĂ©giques ainsi qu’avec les partenaires de mise en Ɠuvre.
Exigences du poste

Expérience :

  • Minimum 5 ans d’expĂ©riences dans l’exĂ©cution de tĂąches similaires Ă  celles dĂ©crites en lien avec la thĂ©matique Gouvernance communale de l’AEPHA au sein d’organisations professionnelles Ă  l’échelle nationale ou sous rĂ©gionale.
  • Une expĂ©rience en Afrique francophone serait un atout
  • Minimum 5 ans d’expĂ©riences en gestion de programme/projet
  • ExpĂ©rience en Ă©laboration de plan stratĂ©gique communal AEPHA
  • ExpĂ©rience en assistance technique des communes et des structures Ă©tatiques
  • ExpĂ©rience de travail au sein d’une Ă©quipe pluridisciplinaire et de collaboration avec des experts de diffĂ©rentes spĂ©cialitĂ©s et origines
Formation académique

Au moins BAC+4 en sciences sociales, sciences de l’eau et de l’assainissement, dĂ©veloppement rural, ou toutes spĂ©cialisations universitaires Ă©quivalentes en lien avec le dĂ©veloppement rural ou la gestion des services d’eau potable et d’assainissement.

Compétences et qualités personnelles

Le ou la titulaire du poste doit avoir la maturité personnelle et une expérience professionnelle suffisante pour assumer les responsabilités liées au poste.

Les principales qualités requises sont :

  • Excellente maĂźtrise de la thĂ©matique Gouvernance communale d’AEPHA avec des expĂ©riences solides et pertinentes
  • AutoritĂ© et aptitude Ă  diriger des experts pluridisciplinaires gĂ©ographiquement isolĂ©s
  • MĂ©ticulositĂ© et excellente aptitude Ă  organiser ses tĂąches et respecter les dĂ©lais
  • Excellente maĂźtrise de l'informatique, notamment les applications Word & Excel et diverses applications et interfaces de messagerie Ă©lectronique
  • Excellentes capacitĂ©s rĂ©dactionnelles en français
  • Grande Ă©loquence orale en Français
  • CapacitĂ© Ă  lire l’anglais et connaissances de base pour le parler et l’écrire
  • Excellentes aptitudes pour les relations interpersonnelles et la communication
  • CapacitĂ© Ă  exĂ©cuter sous pression un volume important de tĂąches de façon autonome et efficace avec peu d'encadrement
  • Disposition Ă  apprendre et s'amĂ©liorer
  • Rigueur et quĂȘte constante d’excellence et des rĂ©sultats de qualitĂ©
  • HabiletĂ© Ă  analyser les situations critiques et proposer les actions correctives
  • Aptitude Ă  travailler en Ă©quipe et Ă  respecter les contributions des autres membres de l'organisation
  • Excellentes qualitĂ©s de nĂ©gociation
  • Aptitude et disponibilitĂ© Ă  voyager occasionnellement dans le cadre du travail
  • Engagement crĂ©dible envers les valeurs de l’entreprise : professionnalisme, intĂ©gritĂ© et crĂ©ativitĂ©.
SynthÚse des compétences clés requises :
  • Sens de l’innovation
  • Sens de l’initiative
  • Challenge
  • CapacitĂ© de prise de dĂ©cision
  • CohĂ©sion d’équipe
  • CapacitĂ© de supervision
  • CapacitĂ© de communication et d’influence
  • RĂ©seautage
  • CapacitĂ© Ă  rĂ©sister au stress
  • CapacitĂ© d’anticipation
  • FlexibilitĂ©
  • RĂ©silience
  • FidĂ©litĂ©
  • Ethique
Ce qu’IRC attend du ou (de la) titulaire :

TĂąches : D'une maniĂšre professionnelle et diligente, effectuer le travail spĂ©cifiĂ© dans cette description de l’emploi et les tĂąches spĂ©cifiques comme convenu dans le contrat annuel de performance et revu pĂ©riodiquement avec le responsable hiĂ©rarchique.

Équipe : Travailler au sein de l'Ă©quipe pour atteindre les objectifs de l’entreprise ; Communiquer rĂ©guliĂšrement avec les principaux collĂšgues grĂące Ă  des Ă©changes rĂ©guliers, par courriel, tĂ©lĂ©phone, Skype ou des systĂšmes de communication virtuels similaires, et des rĂ©unions en personne.

Individuel : AdhĂ©rer Ă  nos principes et valeurs ; Maintenir et dĂ©velopper votre propre efficacitĂ©, y compris prendre la responsabilitĂ© de votre santĂ© ; votre bien-ĂȘtre gĂ©nĂ©ral et investir dans votre propre dĂ©veloppement professionnel en ce qui concerne notre vision et notre mission ; Soyez prĂȘt Ă  vous adapter Ă  l'environnement changeant que nous, en tant qu'entreprise de dĂ©veloppement ; Porter Ă  notre attention les problĂšmes qui pourraient affecter notre capacitĂ© Ă  atteindre nos objectifs, y compris vos besoins d’appui dans votre propre rĂŽle.

Ce que le ou la titulaire peut attendre d’IRC :

  • Un salaire et des avantages sociaux Ă©quitables, compĂ©titifs, abordables et conformes au statut d'entreprise sociale d’IRC
  • Des ressources raisonnables pour faire votre travail (bureau, Ă©quipement, budget, etc.), dans le respect de nos contraintes
  • Une bonne initiation, un soutien continu et des Ă©valuations rĂ©guliĂšres par votre supĂ©rieur hiĂ©rarchique (y compris les ressources financiĂšres et le temps pour votre propre dĂ©veloppement professionnel)
  • Collaboration et travail d'Ă©quipe de vos collĂšgues dans une ambiance conviviale et professionnelle
Conditions du poste

Intitulé du poste : Charge (e) de programme Gouvernance AEPHA au Mali
Contrat : CDD de droit Malien 1 an renouvelable selon performances - Emploi Ă  plein temps
Localisation : Bamako – Mali, avec des frĂ©quents dĂ©placements dans les rĂ©gions de Koutiala, Sikasso, Mopti et Koulikoro
Prise de service : 01 Aout 2022
Supérieur hiérarchique : Directrice Pays d'IRC au Mali
Salaire : Selon la grille IRC
Autres avantages : Dotation communication, Assurance maladie SANLAM & (AMO), Formation et coaching pour le développement professionnel, etc.

Candidature :

Les candidats intĂ©ressĂ©s par cette offre peuvent soumettre leur dossier de candidature composĂ© d’un CV minimum 2 pages et maximum 5 pages et d’une lettre de motivation Ă  l’adresse mail recruitmentmali@ircwash.org  avec comme objet de l’e-mail « Candidature au poste Charge (e) de programme Gouvernance AEPHA au Mali » au plus tard le 22 Juillet 2022 Ă  17h00.

La lettre de motivation et le CV peuvent ĂȘtre rĂ©digĂ©s en Anglais ou en Français. La lettre est essentielle pour la candidature - sans la lettre de motivation, le CV sera rejetĂ©.

Les dossiers reçus dans les dĂ©lais prescrits feront l’objet d’un accusĂ© de rĂ©ception. Il ne sera donnĂ© suite qu’aux candidatures pour lesquelles IRC aurait trouvĂ© un intĂ©rĂȘt. Les entretiens avec les candidats seront programmĂ©s dans la semaine du 25 Juillet. Vous trouverez de plus amples informations sur notre organisation Ă  l'adresse www.ircwash.org.

Town sanitation plans for four towns in Kabarole District, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:46

Each town sanitation plan is a strategic and integrated documentation of sanitation interventions and services tailored to Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils

Kijura Town Council working on the Town Sanitation Plan

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH master plan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH master plan, with Kabarole district in the lead.

IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

These plans providing a strategic framework to deliver and improve sanitation in the selected towns through short-, medium-, and long-term goals. Town Sanitation Plans aim at coordinating and integrating various sanitation-related measures at the town council level including physical planning, sanitation marketing, Behaviour Change Communication (BCC), local private sector involvement, law enforcement, and full stakeholder participation, among others.

Each town sanitation plan is a strategic and integrated documentation of sanitation interventions and services in the town councils. This is not a conventional technical sanitation master plan focusing on engineering and financial aspects, rather it sets out the strategies, objectives, targets, operational actions, and resources needed to achieve the vision and objectives for improvements along the sanitation value chain in the town councils.

The planning process and the results are derived from consultation with local stakeholders; capturing realities and proposing solutions that are locally generated by the stakeholders and not technocrats outside the town council.  The target groups are technical and non-technical stakeholders (residents, Community Based Organisations and funding agencies based in Kijura or the region, Non-Governmental Organisations, National Water and Sewerage Corporation, Kabarole District Local Government and Town Council) who have an interest in improving sanitation at the local level.

The actions and interventions presented in the plan are focused on improving sanitation in households, public schools, public places (e.g., markets, bus/taxi stops), and healthcare facilities. In addition, the plan proposes interventions to improve the collection and treatment of faecal sludge in the town. The planning horizon is set until the year 2040.

The plans also outline estimates on the required investments to be made either by the Town Council, Kabarole District Local Government (KDLG), and/or donor agencies for improvements along the sanitation value chain.       

The development of the Town Sanitation Plans (TSPs) was facilitated by IRC Uganda with funding from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation for Kijuura and Mugusu Town Councils, and the Waterloo Foundation for Kasenda and Kiko Town Councils.

Town sanitation plan for Mugusu Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:25

A costed strategic approach towards achieving improved sanitation services for households and institutions and the entire service chain.

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

This Town Sanitation Plan for Mugusu Town Council provides a costed strategic approach towards achieving improved sanitation services for households and institutions and the entire service chain in Mugusu Town Council. To ensure the sustainability of this plan, a Sanitation Task Force was formed and trained to build their capacity in handling hygiene and sanitation-related issues. A Sanitation Stakeholders Forum was also formed comprising of different stakeholders relevant in the WASH sector to validate the baseline findings and support the implementation of the Plan.

Town sanitation plan for Kijura Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:17

Ensuring proper handling of human waste both within the households and institutions.

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The objective of the Kijura Town Sanitation Plan is to ensure proper handling of human waste both within the households and institutions. To ensure the sustainability of this plan, a Sanitation Task Force  was formed and trained to build their capacity in handling hygiene and sanitation-related issues.

Town sanitation plan for Kiko Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 13:09

Achieving universal access to sustainable sanitation for a clean, healthy and productive urban environment by 2040 through active participation of all stakeholders.

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The vision of the Kiko Town Sanitation Plan is: "Achieving universal access to sustainable sanitation for a clean, healthy and productive urban environment by 2040 through active participation of all stakeholders".

The vision will be achieved through 15 objectives with targets in the short term until 2025, mid-term until 2030 and long-term until 2040. 

Town sanitation plan for Kasenda Town Council, Uganda

6 July 2022 at 12:55

Achieving a healthy tourism town with universal access to sustainable sanitation and an improved community livelihood for all by 2040 through engaging all stakeholders.

Kabarole District has set its vision on achieving 100% coverage of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all by 2030. This vision is outlined in the Kabarole District WASH masterplan 2018-2030, which describes elements that need to be addressed and prescribes the strategies on how to address the gaps in WASH services in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. IRC in its programming continues to facilitate implementation of the WASH masterplan, with Kabarole district in the lead. It is upon this background that IRC supported the development of integrated and sustainable Town Sanitation Plans for four town councils in Kabarole namely, Kasenda, Mugusu, Kijura and Kiko Town Councils.

The vision of Kasenda Town Sanitation Plan is: "Achieving a healthy tourism town with universal access to sustainable sanitation and an improved community livelihood for all by 2040 through engaging all stakeholders."

The vision will be achieved through 17 objectives with targets in the short term until 2025, mid-term until 2030 and long-term until 2040.

Role of private sector in universal access to sanitation

5 July 2022 at 12:24

New free online course on Market-Based Sanitation

A new online course on the basics of market-based sanitation brings together the latest thinking from around the world on enabling the private sector to contribute to improved and safely managed sanitation services. It has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. The course aims to equip users with insights and tools on the role of market-based sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services.

The scale of investment required to deliver sanitation goods and services to those who lack access is beyond the capacity of public finance alone. As Monte Achenbach, one of the course contributors and PSI’s chief of party for Transform WASH, said, ‘Imagine that a government needs to provide sanitation services to each household? That cannot be achieved by government action on their own. It is beyond the means of any government. This means there is a clear role for households to invest in improved sanitation services and for the private sector to produce and sell an array of products to meet their needs.’

 

Changing mindsets

Approaching sanitation as a market requires a shift in mind set, especially in governments and development partners. They often see businesses as input suppliers and contractors. In a market-based sanitation approach, businesses can engage in demand creation, manufacturing of goods and services (such as slab manufacturing, installation of toilets), and promotion and sales of goods and services (such as retailers and sales agents) to accelerate access to basic (improved) sanitation services.

Another shift in mindset that is needed is viewing households as consumers, moving away from the traditional view of households as beneficiaries, which too often resulted in offering them products that failed to meet their demand, aspirations or needs.

Market-based sanitation focuses on households as active customers of products and services. It takes a user-centred and business supplier approach to developing and producing sanitation products and services that people want and can afford and that businesses can deliver and sell profitably. The goal of building sanitation markets is to achieve ever-expanding, self-sustaining household demand for, and access to, new products and services.

Sanitation as a service

The other shift in thinking required is to see sanitation as a service that is much more than a toilet. To ensure sustainable access to safe sanitation, this concept of a service comprises much more than a physical structure. The sanitation service chain consists of six connected functions: capturing, containing, emptying, transporting, treating, and safely disposing or reusing human waste (i.e., faeces and urine, possibly including black water and grey water, see figure below).

Sanitation service chain

Access to sanitation requires products and services at both the household and the community level. The private sector is an essential part of the solution and can provide products and services for the entire sanitation service chain.

Part of a holistic approach

Market-based sanitation is an essential part of a holistic approach towards reaching safely managed sanitation services (i.e., Sustainable Development Goal 6). Specifically, it's about moving up the sanitation service ladder from a limited to a basic service and, ultimately, to safely managed services for all. It is linked to other approaches for reaching SDG 6, as well (see image below):

Market-based sanitation (MBS) is an umbrella term and includes approaches such as ‘sanitation market shaping,’ ‘sanitation as a business,’, and ‘sanitation marketing’ (or ‘SanMark’). While individual understanding and definitions may vary, the MBS approach focuses generally on improving private sector capacity to supply sanitation products and services and increasing customer demand through commercial marketing techniques. It includes a comprehensive approach toward the WASH system to create a thriving sanitation market in a country.

Social and Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC) is a communication strategy that encourages individuals and communities to adopt new behaviours. It is a strategy that triggers people and their communities to adopt healthy, beneficial, and positive behavioural practices.

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) or community-led total sanitation and hygiene (CLTS-H) is a rural-focused behaviour change approach for ending open defecation through community participation. In simplified terms, CLTS-H (or similar community approaches to total sanitation) focus on getting people to stop defecating in the open and to start using a self-constructed (often unimproved) pit latrine.

Microfinance is the provision of small (aka “micro”) loans to low-income individuals or businesses with minimal collateral requirements.

Subsidies can be powerful and progressive tools for increasing water and sanitation access when they are designed in specific measurable achievable and realistic, timely and targeted ways and implemented effectively. This is part of session 7.

Public investments by governments (from taxes or transfers) in sanitation services will always be needed. No country in the world has realised safely managed water and sanitation services for all without public investments.

Together, this mix of approaches, with a wider strengthening of the WASH system on factors such as finance, demand, community by-law, can realise safely managed sanitation services for all.

JMP sanitation ladder

Image: The JMP sanitation service ladder with approaches to move from open defecation towards safely managed sanitation services (i.e., SDG 6). Adapted from Trémolet, S. (2012). Sanitation markets: Using economics to improve the delivery of services along the sanitation value chain.

Market-based sanitation: the basics

The free 12-hour online course provides insights and tools for the private sector to contribute to improved and safely managed sanitation services (i.e., realising Sustainable Development Goal 6) by 2030. To reach SDG 6, the private sector is essential in providing products and services that people need and want.

By the end of the course, users will have a good understanding of the role of market-based sanitation as part of strong WASH systems needed to realise universal and sustainable sanitation services. Users will know:

  • What market-based sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying market-based sanitation
  • Market-based sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems

The course is available on the WASH Systems Academy as a self-paced and self-guided course. It can also be used in combination with webinars, group work, on the job support or part of a 3-day workshop.

The online course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics’ is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy.


 

About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments.

USAID           PSi Ethiopia          WASH Ethiopia    Plan International     ANV   IRC Ethiopia

We're all about partnership for impact

29 June 2022 at 17:15

IRC is all about partnership for impact and 2021 saw us create exciting new partnerships and consolidate existing ones.

IRC annual report cover photo 2021

Destination 2030: a vision of local, national and global impact and scale

2021 was the final year of our medium-term strategic plan (2017-21), and we ended it on an upbeat note when, in August, we cemented our Alliance with Water For People and launched our visionary Destination 2030 Strategy. The vision is clear: the passionate pursuit of sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services for all. Working together to drive exponential progress in the delivery of WASH, and guided by our shared Destination 2030 Strategy, we will serve 20 million, reach 200 million and change the system. By 2030 we will have radically increased our impact while tripling the annual investment in water and sanitation systems.

Leveraging partnerships and building new relationships in our partner districts

Destination 2030 is all about a shared commitment to scale, impact and change, with the delivery of services to everyone in our partner districts at its heart. Four years after launching the first district 'master plan' (in Asutifi North, Ghana, in March 2018) we continue to see the results that come from empowered local leadership and collective action around a shared vision of access for all. That original master plan has now been joined by 18 others, of which six were finalised, validated and approved by district leadership in 2021.

In Niger, our two partner districts are the only ones – out of 266 communes – to have master plans. Regular service level monitoring means that these district governments are also the only ones to base their decisions on accurate knowledge of WASH service levels in local health centres and schools. In Ghana, the work of implementing the master plan in Asutifi North district has led to the creation of the National Development Planning Commission's WASH Toolkit for the sector. And some districts, like Asutifi North, are on track to reach their entire population with safe water services by 2030. Other areas, like Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger, are faced with continuous security challenges, and partners in these areas need to find new ways of working. In 2021, IRC and its partners started using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to pinpoint the location of vulnerable populations and identify ways to reach them.

The move towards more professionally managed rural water supplies continues. 2021 was also the year where we showed how important it is to deepen our relationships with utilities, in rural as well as urban areas. Professionally managed water services can contribute to overcoming common challenges related to rural water service provision, including low management capacity and performance of service providers, in order to ensure sustainable basic, and where possible, safely managed water services.

For example, in Uganda we formed a tri-partite partnership with the National Water and Sewerage Corporation and Kabarole District Local Government to extend a piped water system network to ensure 100% sustainable access to the 12,800 people living in Kabende sub-county. We also worked on influencing Burkina Faso's national utility, ONEA, to increase its focus on reaching people in small towns. This will include services for 10,000 people.

Other partnerships

Our new Partnership for WASH Systems in Africa with UNICEF and Water For People is strengthening national WASH systems in 19 countries in Africa. We do this by improving sector capacities, and knowledge management, advocating for systems change at national and regional levels and providing technical assistance in WASH systems strengthening to UNICEF country offices. An important part of this has been updating UNICEF's systems and finance courses on the Agora training platform together with our WASH Systems Academy.

This year, our WASH Systems Academy had 1,066 participants with 1,404 enrolments and 483 certificates. In Ethiopia we used the online WASH Systems Academy, together with in-person workshops, to tailor the course to the local context.

Public Development Banks are central to improving the financing of the water and sanitation sector, and it is only when the sector is strong that we can achieve SDG 6, the Paris Agreement objectives and enhance biodiversity protection. Building on studies conducted as part of our consultancy work, the Agence Française de Développement (AFD) launched a Water Finance Coalition of Public Development Banks. IRC acts as the Secretariat of the coalition.

We also contributed to other partnerships, networks and global platforms including Agenda for Change, Millennium Water Alliance, Netherlands Water Partnership NGO Platform, Rural Water Supply Network, Sanitation and Water for All (SWA), UN Water and Water Integrity Network. This included supporting the leadership of Agenda for Change to change its governance to one that puts country collaborations at the centre.

Challenges and what's next

As in every year, we faced challenges. Covid-19 tested our ability to work through sporadic lockdowns, while political conflict in many of our focus countries tested the resolve of our teams and the incremental improvement that lies at the heart of our systems strengthening approach.

The world is not on track to deliver its 2030 goals for safe and sustainable drinking water and sanitation services to everyone. Efforts are confronted by a lack of high-level political vision and leadership in many countries. There are too few Swachh Bharats or Jal Jeevans, and too many countries and actors that still see providing a shared handpump or pit latrine as appropriate goals. They are not! Scaling the successes we've seen in our partner districts, especially the expansion of professionally and safely managed services, requires clear and strong political commitment not just to systems strengthening – but to profound systems change.

Triggering and supporting this change is at the heart of Destination 2030. It is also the reason for our continued support to key partnerships like Agenda for Change and Sanitation and Water for All. In order to widen and reinforce the network of likeminded partners committed to this change, we will host signature events in 2022 and 2023: All Systems Go Africa in Ghana in October 2022, and All Systems Connect in the Netherlands in May 2023. We hope you'll join us.

Read our Annual Report 2021, our Monitoring Report 2021 and our 2021 Financial Report for more highlights and details of our work.

IRC at a glance 2021

Join the course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The basics’

28 June 2022 at 09:04

How do you go from open defecation and unsafe sanitation to reliable and sustainable services?

Opening slide WASH Systems Academy course on market-based sanitation

Making sure that even the simplest services are maintained depends on the ongoing collaboration of a complex network of individuals and organisations. It's about strengthening the systems (i.e., the actors and factors) needed to deliver sanitation services.

Market-Based Sanitation (MBS) interventions are a promising approach to addressing (a part) of the global sanitation challenge sustainably and at scale. It is particularly suitable in settings in which households use traditional unimproved pit latrines but do not yet have access to affordable products and services to build an improved sanitation facility.

In this course, Market-Based Sanitation refers to strengthening the private sector in delivering products and services for the construction of improved onsite sanitation facilities, and to increase the willingness of end users to invest in the construction, upgrade, and/or maintenance of a toilet.

The course brings together the latest thinking from around the world and has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. It will equip you with insights and tools on the role of Market-Based Sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services. The course is available as:

  • A free 12-hour online course on the WASH Systems Academy, ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The basics’ that is self-guided and self-paced.
  • On demand the online course can be customised and combined with structured online support, with webinars and group work or as part of a blended approach in a face-to-face training workshop. 
Course objectives

By the end of the training, you will have a good understanding of the role of Market-Based Sanitation as part of strong water and sanitation systems needed to realise universal and sustainable sanitation services. You will know:

  • What Market-Based Sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying Market-Based Sanitation
  • Market-Based Sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems
The WASH Systems Academy

The WASH Systems Academy is collaborative online platform developed to assist water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector professionals with the knowledge and tools to strengthen WASH systems. It now has over 3000 users from 110 countries. It is available on www.washsystemsacademy.org


 

About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments

.

USAID      PSi Ethiopia      ONE WASH Ethiopia  Plan International

  SNV     IRC Ethiopia

Blended training for improving market-based sanitation in Ethiopia

28 June 2022 at 09:02

New online course on market-based sanitation tested in blended learning session in Ethiopia.

Participants hard at work during the blended learning session in Bishoftu, Ethiopia

USAID Transform WASH has consistently worked to improve capacity for market-based sanitation in Ethiopia. As part of these efforts, a new online course was developed to introduce virtual learners to the topic. As part of testing the course, from the 10th to the 12th of May 2022, a blended training -- mixing online and in person learning -- was organised in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. The training was joined by 22 people from national and regional government offices (e.g., health and job creation), national training institutes (technical and vocational training centers and the Ethiopian Water Technology Institute), microfinance institutions (savings and credit associations and banks), and development partners.

Participants individually took the 12-hour online course, ‘’Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics,’’ then participated in face-to-face presentations by experts on key content of the online course followed by group discussions. 

Getting to grips with sanitation as a business and learning online

Participants had a very mixed background and level of experience with market-based sanitation. Most had never previously followed an online course. Some struggled on the first day with setting up an account on the online platform to access the course. They needed the support of the facilitators to get started and gain confidence in using the online platform during the first two days.

Participants expressed satisfaction with the mix of in-person support and online coursework. After completing each session, facilitators provided summary presentations, and participants actively joined in discussions. They discussed the implementation of market-based sanitation on the ground and shared best practices from different parts of the country.

After three days of blended training, 20 of the 22 participants completed the online course and earned their certificates. They found the self-study through the online course motivating because it enabled them to visualize their progress. It spurred them on to engage actively with the materials.

Reactions from participants

Participants liked the online content on market-based sanitation, especially experiences from around the globe presented in short texts, videos, and animations. The course provides additional resources as tools and manuals mixed with exercises and reflection in online forum discussions. The presentations by experts brought in more examples from the Ethiopian context, to which they could relate, and helped resolve issues. The lively group discussions allowed for further sharing of experiences with market-based sanitation.

‘The training developed my confidence. When I passed the tests online and earned the certificate, I felt so proud. I will now continue with other courses on the platform.’ Shitahun Yirsaw, Amhara Cooperative Agency

Participants also felt that using a blended learning approach made it easier to cascade and replicate the training at regional and district levels with their partners. Inviting other colleagues to follow the free online course will make it easier to pass on knowledge than by simply using a training manual.

‘The course taught me that sanitation is an untapped business opportunity for the jobless youths.’ - Dibaba Hordofa, Oromia job creation agency

‘Some of the challenges that I heard from small and micro-enterprises that benefited from the loan we provided for slab manufacturing are like enterprises in other countries, I understood from the course. This gives us confidence in providing loans even if there are problems’ – Bati Woldao, the Sinke bank.

About the course Market-based Sanitation: The Basics

This new 12-hour online course brings together the latest thinking from around the world on enabling the private sector to offer more products and services for improved and safely managed household sanitation. It has been developed by IRC, with the support of USAID Transform WASH, in collaboration with PSI and Water For People. The course aims to equip users with insights and tools on the role of market-based sanitation in creating the strong systems needed for universal and lasting sanitation services. 

By the end of the course, users will have a good understanding of the role of market-based sanitation as a key component of strong WASH systems, which are needed to realise universal, sustainable sanitation services. Users will know:

  • What market-based sanitation entails
  • Different approaches to applying market-based sanitation
  • Market-based sanitation as an essential part of stronger WASH systems

The online course is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy and is a self-paced and self-guided course. It can also be used in combination with webinars, group work, on the job support, or part of a 3-day workshop.

The online course ‘Market-Based Sanitation: The Basics’ is available for free on the WASH Systems Academy.

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About Transform WASH

USAID Transform WASH aims to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) outcomes in Ethiopia by increasing market access to and sustained use of a broader spectrum of affordable WASH products and services, with a substantial focus on sanitation.

Transform WASH achieves this by transforming the market for low-cost quality WASH products and services: stimulating demand at the community level, strengthening supply chains, and improving the enabling environment for a vibrant private market.

USAID Transform WASH is a USAID-funded activity implemented by PSI in collaboration with SNV, Plan International, and IRC WASH. The consortium is working closely with government agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, the One WASH National Program, and regional and sub-regional governments.

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