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☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

Summary progress update 2021 : SDG 6 – water and sanitation for all

By: Anonymous

The world is not on track to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG 6), which aims to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all by 2030.

 

This report provides an update on the status of the 8 targets of Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG 6), which aims to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all by 2030. The overall conclusion is that the world is not on track to achieve SDG 6.

Billions of people worldwide still live without safely managed drinking water and sanitation, especially in rural areas and least developed countries; the current rate of progress need to quadruple to reach the global target of universal access by 2030.

For wastewater treatment and water quality, it is not possible to assess the global situation since country data are missing for large parts of the world, leaving billions of people at risk. 

Water use has remained relatively stable at the global level during the last 10 years, and with 17 per cent of available water resources being withdrawn, the world as a whole is not considered water-stressed. However, this
number hides stark regional differences: in some regions the level of water stress has increased by 35 per cent during the last two decades, and many countries withdraw all their renewable water resources or even rely on nonrenewable resources that will eventually run dry.

When it comes to integrated water resources management (IWRM), the current rate of progress needs to double to meet the global targets, and only two SDG regions are on track to have all their transboundary water bodies
covered by operational cooperation agreements.

One fifth of the world's river basins are experiencing rapid changes in the area covered by surface waters, indicative of flooding and drought events, which are associated with climate change.

Although official development assistance (ODA) commitments to the water sector increased slightly in recent years, this is mainly due to an increase in concessional lending, and the gap between actual disbursements and future commitments is growing.

Participatory procedures are increasingly recognized in national policies and laws whereas their implementation have been moderate. 

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Biweekly WASH Research Update – March 4, 2021

By: usaidwaterckm

This is the final WASH research update from the WCKM project, which was supported by the USAID’s RFS Center for Water Security, Sanitation and Hygiene. This update features new additions to the Globalwaters.org website, 18 recent studies, reports and webinars and we hope these updates have been useful to you.

Updates to Globalwaters.org

WASH Studies and Resources

COVID-19

Handwashing/Hygiene

Menstrual Hygiene and Health

Sanitation Issues

Water/WASH Issues

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

WASH well positioned in Bangladesh's new Five Year Plan

By: Digbijoy

Water resources management, equitable access and hygiene receive due attention.

Cover of Bangladesh's Eighth Five Year Plan (July2020 - June2025)

The Government of Bangladesh has recently published its 8th Five Year Plan positioning water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) as a cross-cutting issue of different development initiatives. The plan, which was developed by the Planning Commission, was approved by the National Economic Council (NEC) and Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina on 29th December last year. It has become available online from 3rd of February.

The Five Year Plan (July 2020-June 2025) is a key document that illustrates the strategy and action plan of the country to achieve its development goals. It carries more importance as it illustrates the plan to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets. WASH sector players, especially the advocacy leaders, campaigned to the government for better positioning of WASH issues in the development agenda, which has been reflected in the 8th Five Year Plan. The plan prioritises the need to increase storage in the existing water retention bodies [Part 2. Chapter 4: Strategies for Agriculture and Water Resource Management].

Overall the Plan acknowledges the inequalities in WASH access and disproportionate impact on the poor, and the environmental hazards from unsafe disposal of faecal sludge as challenge areas to address. It considers context-specific WASH interventions in hard-to-reach areas and creating an enabling environment for WASH services as preferred strategies [Part 2. Sector 7. Local Government, Rural Development and Cooperatives].

In the Plan, WASH is one of the key focus areas for the multi-sectoral, multi-agency approach to improved nutrition, especially through handwashing and other hygiene practices. Additionally increasing access to basic facilities such as toilets and sanitary napkins for women and girls in the work place have been considered as a part of the poverty reduction, social protection and inclusion strategy. [Part 2. Sector 9: Housing and Community Amenities and Sector 10: Health, population and Nutrition].

Despite the need for more focus on WASH issues in the fight against COVID-19, the inclusion of WASH in the Plan is expected to provide a positive contribution towards achievement of SDG target 6.

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

8th Five Year Plan, July 2020 - June 2025 : promoting prosperity and fostering inclusiveness

By: Anonymous

The first steps to bring Bangladesh closer to attaining Upper Middle-Income Country (UMIC) status, major Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets, and eliminating extreme poverty.

 

This 8th Five Year Plan represents the first phase of the country's Perspective Plan 2041 (PP2041), which aims to  bring Bangladesh closer to the goals of attaining Upper Middle-Income Country (UMIC) status, attaining major Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets, and eliminating extreme poverty by FY2031. 

In the backdrop of these factors, the 8th Plan centres on six core themes:
  1. Rapid recovery for COVID-19 to restore human health, confidence, employment, income and economic activities;
  2. GDP growth acceleration, employment generation, productivity acceleration and rapid poverty reduction;
  3. A broad-based strategy of inclusiveness with a view to empowering every citizen to participate fully and benefit from the development process and helping the poor and vulnerable with social protection- based income transfers;
  4. A sustainable development pathway that is resilient to disaster and climate change; entails sustainable use of natural resources; and successfully manages the inevitable urbanization transition;
  5. Development and improvement of critical institutions necessary to lead the economy to UMIC status;
  6. Attaining SDG targets and coping up the impact of Least Developed Country (LDC) graduation.

The Plan itself is divided into two main parts:

  1. Macroeconomic perspective: strategic directions and policy framework
  2. Sector development strategies

References to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) can be found in Part 2, in the following sections:

  • Chapter 4: Strategies for Agriculture and Water Resource Management
  • Sector 7. Local Government, Rural Development and Cooperatives
  • Sector 9: Housing and Community Amenities, and
  • Sector 10: Health, population and Nutrition

 

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Investing in Menstrual Health and Hygiene

By: dietvorst

Leading global health organizations have unveiled a groundbreaking analysis outlining what donors, national governments, and the private sector need to invest to accelerate progress for menstrual health and hygiene (MHH). The report, Making the Case for Investing in Menstrual Health and Hygiene, is part of a growing effort to advance gender equality and contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

dietvorst

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

New Guides from the Sanitation Learning Hub

By: usaidwaterckm

New Guides from the Sanitation Learning Hub
We are very pleased to announce three new Sanitation Learning Hub guides and the third edition of our handwashing compendium.

  • ‘Incontinence: We Need to Talk About Leaks’, Frontiers of Sanitation: Innovations and Insights 16
  • How to Talk About Incontinence: A Checklist
  • ‘Rapid Action Learning for Sanitation and Hygiene Programming’, Frontiers of Sanitation: Innovations and Insights 15
  • ‘Learning in the Sanitation and Hygiene Sector’, SLH Learning Brief 7
  • Handwashing Compendium for Low Resource Settings: A Living Document, Edition 3,

We hope that these resources are useful to you and your work. Please send any feedback to us at SLH@ids.ac.uk
 
Many good wishes,
Elaine Mercer, Sanitation Learning Hub

Nouveaux guides publiés par la Sanitation Learning Hub

Chères/Chers ami·e·s et collègues,

Nous sommes ravis de vous annoncer trois nouveaux guides publiés par la Sanitation Learning Hub et la troisième édition de notre Compendium sur le lavage des mains :

Nous espérons que ces ressources vous seront utiles et vous aideront dans vos travaux. Veuillez nous faire part de vos commentaires et suggestions : SLH@ids.ac.uk

Novos guias do Sanitation Learning Hub

Caros amigos e colegas,

Temos o prazer de anunciar quatro novos guias do Sanitation Learning Hub e a terceira edição do nosso compêndio de lavagem das mãos:

Esperamos que estes recursos sejam úteis, para si e para o seu trabalho. Envie-nos os comentários que possa ter SLH@ids.ac.uk

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

USAID Grant Opportunity – Rural Water Research & Learning

By: usaidwaterckm

USAID Grant Opportunity – Rural Water Research & Learning

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Bureau for Resilience and Food Security (RFS) Center for Water Security, Sanitation and Hygiene is issuing this Draft Program Description for the purpose of providing stakeholders and potential partners an opportunity to review, comment, suggest, and enhance areas of a new global water research activity: the Rural Water Research & Learning Activity.

The purpose of this activity is to expand the evidence base for rural water supply and use of findings to inform rural water policy and programming in collaboration with partners, to increase the availability and sustainable management of safe water for the underserved and most vulnerable.

Link to grant documentation

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

90% of climate disasters are water related

By: Naafs

Building resilience is not a "nice to have"- it is essential, says Ban Ki Moon.

But how can you be resilient, if you don’t have safe drinking water? How can you be resilient to the pandemic without handwashing? Tragically, like COVID, climate impact is felt first, and most severely by the poorest communities that do not have the capacity to prepare for the unpredictable and severe changes. Resilience and dignity start with safe drinking water, decent toilets and good hygiene.

It's time for adaptation

The Netherlands hosted the first ever Climate Adaptation Summit (CAS) earlier this week, bringing global leaders (virtually) together to discuss climate adaptation. Climate change forces us to adapt our environments, cultures and systems to changes that are already happening. This focus on adaptation marks a tectonic shift in global thinking that led Rt. Hon. Alok Sharma MP, UK’s lead for COP26 to emphasise “adapting should not be seen as the poor cousin of mitigation”.

"90% of the climate disasters are water related – either too much, too little, or too dirty", states H.E. Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management. “We must put water at the centre of adaptation”, said Special Envoy International Water Affairs of the Netherlands, Henk Ovink during the water session, “we need better knowledge, dedicated finance and planning for adaptation”.

In response, sessions included for example the Global Centre for Adaptation launching the knowledge exchange Water Action Track and the Netherlands presenting the visually arresting Cultural mirror on Water. My personal favourites were the waterchange makers with stories of change, ranging from WASH and micro-basin protection in Honduras (by Water For People), panel winner Masungi Georeserve with a youth-led movement in the Philippines, and the public favourite, the Mothers parliament in Bangladesh. This latter involves IRC’s partner DORP and resonates with our upcoming launch of the #VoicesForWater campaign and the Watershed legacy story.

90% of the climate disasters are water related – either too much, too little, or too dirty.

Making a case for water, sanitation and hygiene

As the pandemic has shown us, Water Sanitation and Hygiene [WASH] is the foundation for resilience. But the conundrum is that climate change is not the biggest concern. In low- and middle-income country contexts, the key threats and risks to WASH services - and the water resources upon which those services depend - are related to population and economic growth, urbanisation, industrialisation and the expansion of irrigated agriculture. This uncomfortable truth has to be said or we’ll fail when it comes to solutions.

The good news is that we believe the same skills and resources that will allow governments, service providers and other WASH actors to face climate change, are largely the same ones that are needed now to tackle challenges such as the pandemic and others like sustainability of rural water supplies. Put simply, it’s all about building stronger systems. Building capacity in water and sanitation, attracting the finance needed and ensuring strong performance of WASH services should also be our first steps in being prepared to tackle the threats related to climate change.

Finance was fortunately a key theme at the CAS and heads of state and global leaders committed significant amounts. A whole array of funds have become available such as (acronym warning!): the DFCD, LOCaL, CRPP, and the Climate Bridge Fund. However, as Kulthoum Omari Motsumi from the Africa Adaptation Initiative pointed out, there are barriers in making finance available for local adaptations such as complicated accreditation processes, the challenge to provide a climate rationale (lack of data, analysis and science) and the conditions to provide co-finance. Accessibility to such funds will need to be made simpler.

In 24 hours, the CAS succeeded in covering many other topics including circular economies, nature-based solutions and agriculture. Throughout this, the call for building back better after the pandemic, the need for collaboration and the need to unlock finance was omnipresent. The case that resilience, prosperity and health only come with decent toilets, safe drinking water and good hygiene didn’t make it to the main sessions and in hindsight, indicates that the WASH sector is not yet well positioned and needs to do more to make its case. That was a big disappointment. IRC will work with our partners to do our part to address this.

A cynic would say that this summit was just business as usual. After all, it is not the first time that there were loads of commitments, promises and calls for action. However, we would say that the broad consensus for adaptation, the shift in financing structures, the push for local led solutions and youth leadership, may just make this Summit trigger and drive some systematic change. Or as the brilliant host (and IRC champion) Ikenna Azuike concluded, “a summit is only as good as its legacy”.

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

A new effort in responding to COVID-19 in Negelle Arsi and Shashamane

By: tsegaye

IRC WASH Ethiopia is supporting Shashamane and Negelle Arsi woredas on knowledge management around COVID-19.

In Hawassa town, both Districts discussed future COVID-19 response activities

In partnership with Amref Health Africa under the WASH First COVID-19 Response Project, IRC WASH Ethiopia is supporting Shashamane and Negelle Arsi woredas on knowledge management. The purpose of the project is to coordinate COVID-19 prevention and control interventions at woreda, zone, region and national levels. The project will assist stakeholders to convene meetings and document learnings and plan review and distribution of relevant information and materials to the frontline health workers and communities. 

On December 21, 2020, the project organised a planning meeting with the participation of project beneficiary woredas and towns in Hawassa. The head of Shashamane Town Health Office, Teshome Mohammed, was one of the participants at the meeting. He said the meeting discussed the future response activities and reached consensus on what action to take. Teshome learned that the project will support them on WASH infrastructure, personal protective equipment, and behavioural change communication. He also indicated working in collaboration with the government is effective.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, the public took precautionary measures seriously, but overtime carelessness is creeping in. Therefore, this project is an opportunity for the community, according to Erko Bayicha, Negelle Arsi Woreda's Health Office Public Health Emergency Officer.

Samuel Girma is Amref Health Africa's WASH Project Manager. According to Samuel, Amref has supported the government's COVID-19 response. After reviewing their previous activities as a lead consortium member, Amref has planned for this new WASH First COVID-19 response on behalf of WASH SDG program consortium. He said that the aim of the planning workshop was to create synergy among different sectors working on COVID-19 response and to jointly plan for future responses. Samuel also added that IRC WASH Ethiopia will play a great role in documentation and knowledge management activities which could be used as learning for other actors working on the response.

So far, the project conducted a launching and familiarisation workshop, signed an agreement with regional signatories and prepared a 2021 operation plan. With the proposed knowledge management platform, six stakeholder meetings will be held to review the progress and provide support. The progress review will observe the status of agreed actions, feedback on materials, and adjustment of WASH-related content in response to the pandemic. Consequently, communities, health workers, schools and WASH service providers will have a better understanding of mitigation measures against COVID-19. The project will phase out by November 30, 2021.

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

Two districts (woredas) validate and launch WASH SDG master plans

By: tsegaye

Two Ethiopian districts, Shashamane and Negelle Arsi, are developing water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) master plans.

Participants of the workshop listening to Lemessa Mekonta, IRC Ethiopia country director

Shashamane and Negelle Arsi woredas' WASH SDG master plans are being developed with the support of IRC WASH under the WASH SDG Programme. As the planning process nears completion, a validation and launching workshop was held in Hawassa Town from December 22 to 25, 2020. Various zonal and woreda WASH actors participated in the workshop.

The workshop discussed the planning process, the plans, the previous planning experience of the woredas, the reliability of the baseline information, how the plan can be endorsed by the Woreda Councils, and the way forward. Participants of the workshop were content with the discussion and ready to work together to successfully implement the WASH SDG master plans.

The master plans are an opportunity to acquire lots of lessons according to Ali Haji, the Shashamane Woreda Water Office Head. The support provided by IRC WASH and its coordinating efforts to get different WASH sectors on the same page was remarkable, and he said that ‘’this is a good example for other NGOs’’. According to their previous experience, the woreda did not have this kind of platform to collaborate with different stakeholders. He also added that to efficiently implement this master plan, the Woreda Administration will coordinate woreda WASH sector offices and non-governmental organisations to achieve WASH Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

The master plan is a great input for the woreda’s Health Office and other stakeholders, according to Kedir Tahir, Head of the Negelle Arsi Woreda Health Office. He stated that the plan is a nice reference for WASH activities of the woreda. From the master plan, Kedir has learned a lot about the WASH status of his woreda and believes it will allow them to perform better in the future.

The master plan has charted out the budget needed for each activity. Teshome Herpasa, Negelle Arsi Woreda’s Finance Office Head, said that it is a great opportunity to build the capacity of their woreda on WASH. To get the budget needed to implement the plan they will collaborate with different governmental and non-governmental organisations and the public.

Samuel Girma, Amref Health Africa’s WASH Project Manager, said as an organisation working on hygiene and sanitation in both rural and urban areas, they will contribute their role, based on the developed SDG master plan. Additionally, as a WASH Alliance member, they will use the master plan to influence donors and get additional funds. He also stated that the master plan is comprehensive and will serve as guidance for future WASH activities.

Overall, the workshop underscored that the master plans should be presented and discussed at the woreda level, there should be an accountability mechanism in implementing the plan, and the woreda administrations should take the lead in implementing the master plan.  It is suggested that annual plans and five year plans should be derived from the master plan.

The next steps of the SDG master plans’ development will be incorporating inputs from participants and endorsement by the Woreda Council. To effectively implement the SDG master plan, it was emphasised that all key actors are responsible to deliver on their roles and responsibilities.

 

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

Identifying barriers to inclusion in WASH : barriers faced by persons living with disabilities in accessing water, sanitation and hygiene services in Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipal Assembly, Ghana

By: Anonymous

In order to leave no one behind, decision makers and service providers need to examine common beliefs in measuring access to services.

This brief looks at how improved knowledge and skills in social inclusion are improving the capacity to identify excluded persons and advocate for WASH interventions to be accessible to all persons, especially for people living with a disability. It is based on a survey of 22 communities within Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipality, Ghana. The survey examined the characteristics of a random sample of 40 people living with a disability, and their environmental, institutional and attitudinal barriers to inclusion. The study concludes that in order to leave no one behind, decision makers and service providers need to examine common beliefs in measuring access to services. 

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Call for contributions: 42nd WEDC International Conference [online]

By: dietvorst

The call for contributions is now open for the 42nd WEDC International Conference: Equitable and Sustainable WASH Services: Future challenges in a rapidly changing world.

The Conference will be held online from 13-15 September 2021.

The conference comprises three days of online presentations and interactive discussions of peer-reviewed content; agency events from international organizations working in the sector; online exhibitions; and the opportunity for delegates to meet and network in virtual rooms.

Conference themes

  1. Climate change: weather extremes (e.g. floods and droughts) and water resources management, including but not limited to topics related to fundamental understanding, remote sensing, modelling and management strategies
  2. Integrating disaster risk management into WASH interventions
  3. Sanitation systems and services e.g. household and peri-urban approaches and faecal sludge management
  4. Rural water supply e.g. approaches to sustainability and serving the hardest to reach communities and households
  5. Groundwater resources
  6. Innovations and advances in biowaste, wastewater treatment and waste to energy technologies e.g. anaerobic digestion, composting, thermochemical processing, resource recovery and circular economy concepts; and end-use applications
  7. Urban water management
  8. Institutional development and programme management
  9. Data analytics, machine learning/AI applications in WASH

Call for contributions: http://wedc.lu/42-call-for-contributions

dietvorst

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Menstrual hygiene management in schools: midway progress update on the “MHM in Ten” 2014–2024 global agenda

By: usaidwaterckm

Menstrual hygiene management in schools: midway progress update on the “MHM in Ten” 2014–2024 global agenda. Health Research Policy and Systems, January 2021.

Progress has been made in recent years to bring attention to the challenges faced by school-aged girls around managing menstruation in educational settings that lack adequate physical environments and social support in low- and middle-income countries.

To enable more synergistic and sustained progress on addressing menstruation-related needs while in school, an effort was undertaken in 2014 to map out a vision, priorities, and a ten-year agenda for transforming girls’ experiences, referred to as Menstrual Hygiene Management in Ten (MHM in Ten).

The overarching vision is that girls have the information, support, and enabling school environment for managing menstruation with dignity, safety and comfort by 2024. This requires improved research evidence and translation for impactful national level policies.

As 2019 marked the midway point, we assessed progress made on the five key priorities, and remaining work to be done, through global outreach to the growing network of academics, non-governmental organizations, advocates, social entrepreneurs, United Nations agencies, donors, and national governments.

This paper delineates the key insights to inform and support the growing MHM commitment globally to maximize progress to reach our vision by 2024. Corresponding to the five priorities, we found that (priority 1) the evidence base for MHM in schools has strengthened considerably, (priority 2) global guidelines for MHM in schools have yet to be created, and (priority 3) numerous evidence-based advocacy platforms have emerged to support MHM efforts.

We also identified (priority 4) a growing engagement, responsibility, and ownership of MHM in schools among governments globally, and that although MHM is beginning to be integrated into country-level education systems (priority 5), resources are lacking.

Overall, progress is being made against identified priorities. We provide recommendations for advancing the MHM in Ten agenda. This includes continued building of the evidence, and expanding the number of countries with national level policies and the requisite funding and capacity to truly transform schools for all students and teachers who menstruate.

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Promotion of low flush toilets in urban Mozambique from innovation idea to social enterprise

By: dietvorst

Infographic of the Biological Urban Sanitation project (BUSP) in Maputo

The Pia Fantastica toilet flushes with just one cup of water under an angle of 45 degrees and has no water seal. It has the convenience of a pedestal like a conventional ceramic toilet, and, if well installed, has no smell or fly problem. It is a toilet made out of concrete which can be produced for a price of just US$ 6.50 and is therefore attractive to the local sanitation market.

The Pia Fantastica was developed as part of the Biological Urban Sanitation Project (2016–2019) where Black Soldier Fly larvae were used for environmental friendly pit emptying.

The project has been translated into a social enterprise “Susamati” run by young professionals in Maputo, Mozambique. Setting up an enterprise is about building a team as well as marketing and sales. At this point, making a financially sustainable enterprise remains a challenge.

Annemarieke J. Mooijman, Yvette E. van Dok, Manuel Lélio A. Gungulo, Björn  Brandberg, Promotion of low flush toilets in urban Mozambique from innovation  idea to social enterprise, Environmental Science & Policy, Volume 116, 2021, Pages 287-291
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901120314167
Use this link for 50 day free access to full article.

dietvorst

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Biweekly WASH research updates – January 4, 2021

By: usaidwaterckm

This biweekly update contains the latest updates to Globalwaters.org as well as recent studies and reports handwashing, sanitation, WASH in schools, WASH in healthcare facilities, water supply issues and COVID-19 and WASH.

Updates to Globalwaters.org

Environmental Health

Using Feedback to Improve Accountability in Global Environmental Health and Engineering. Environ. Sci. Technol., December 2020. 

Handwashing/Hygiene

An assessment of availability of handwashing facilities in households from four East African countries. Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development. In press, 2020. 

Sanitation

Philippines: Can Subsidized Microloans Increase Toilet Ownership and Use for Poor Households? World Bank, November 2020. 

How Much Will Safe Sanitation for All Cost? Evidence from Five Cities. Environ. Sci. Technol., December 2020. (Abstract only for non-subscribers)

Cost effectiveness of community led total sanitation in Ethiopia and Ghana. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, March 2021. 

Water, Sanitation and the Risk of Chronic Conditions among Older Persons in Ghana: Results from the WHO Study on Global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 2. African Population and Health Research Center, December 2020.

Modification of Major Contributors Responsible for Latrine Malodor on Exposure to Hypochlorous Acid: The Potential for Simultaneously Impacting Odor and Infection Hazards to Encourage Latrine Use. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, December 2020. 

Water Supply/Reuse

Evaluating self-reported measures and alternatives to monitor access to drinking water: A case study in Malawi. Science of The Total Environment, January 2021.

25 Years of Partnership with Karnataka: Evolving Model for Sustainable Urban Water Service Delivery. Asian Development Bank, December 2020. 

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

WASH for Women and Girls Fact Sheet. USAID, December 2020.

By: usaidwaterckm

WASH for Women and Girls Fact Sheet. USAID, December 2020.

Through Water for the World, USAID increases access to sustainable water and sanitation services, promotes key hygiene behaviors, and enhances the effective management of water resources in developing countries.

USAID also elevates the status of women and girls to empower them as decision-makers and professionals in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector so they can lead the transformation of water and sanitation services in their own communities and countries.

usaidwaterckm

☑ ☆ ✇ IRC Sanitation

Symposium on small town WASH services in Ethiopia

By: Adank

Some 50 representatives from towns and regional bureaus participated in the small-town WASH symposium on 3 December at the GetFam hotel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. They were joined online by some 30 stakeholders from national and international level during the morning session, focussed on implementation approaches for small town WASH, and the afternoon session, focussed on monitoring small town WASH.

On 3 December, the hybrid face-to-face / online symposium on "Climate-resilient systems approaches for small town WASH services in Ethiopia" took place in the GetFam Hotel in Addis Ababa and online. This event was organised by UNICEF Ethiopia, IRCWASH Ethiopia and the Water Development Committee of the Ministry of Water Resources, Water and Energy of the Government and Ethiopia, with financial support from the British Embassy and KfW.

The objectives of this symposium were to

  1. for sector stakeholders to learn and share on small town WASH, with a focus on system strengthening and climate resilient approaches, and
  2. for sector stakeholders to identify innovations for scaling up and agree on specific areas that need more lobby and advocacy.

The list of presentations with links to the recordings and PowerPoints (in PDF) can be found below. Recordings of the full sessions will be made available soon. 

--


Morning session on implementation approaches for small town WASH

Integrated approach for WASH and BCBT contracting modality, and innovations on inclusive WASH in the ONEWASH PLUS PROGRAMME
Presentation by Lavuun Verstraete, from UNICEF Ethiopia, on the integrated approach towards small town WASH, contracting arrangements and the build-build capacity- transfer (BCBT) approach, as developed and implemented under the ONEWASH Plus Programme.

ONEWASH Plus Programme: Welenchiti experience
Presentation by Feyisa Chala from the Welenchiti Town Water Utility, as a case study of the successes and challenges of the ONEWASH Plus programme in Welenchiti town.

Applying a Learning Alliance Approach in Small town Sanitation (Ethiopia)
Presentation by Muhammed Musa, from IRC WASH Ethiopia / Tetratech, on undertaking a systems approach towards improving small town sanitation through facilitation of town level learning alliances in Wolisso and Debre Birhan.

Integrated water supply model serving refugee and host communities in Gambella
Presentation by Yitbarek Birhanu, from the Itang Town Water Utility, on how the Itang Town water utility served both a large refugee camp population, as well as host communities.

Afternoon session on monitoring small town WASH

Monitoring of small town WASH: Experiences from WaterAid Ethiopia's 20 town capacity Development programme
Presentation by Haile Dinku, from WaterAid Ethiopia, on WaterAid Ethiopia's 20 town programme and the performance monitoring developed and applied under this programme.

Development of performance indicators in Ethiopia
Presentation by Azeb Tadesse, from the Water Development committee of the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Energy, Ethiopia, about performance indicators and benchmarking for urban water services in Ethiopia.

Sustainability checks for small towns in the ONEWASH Plus Programme
Presentation by Marieke Adank, IRC WASH, on sustainability checks, developed and executed under the ONEWASH Plus programme in Ethiopia to monitoring small town WASH services and the conditions for sustainable WASH service provision.

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Recent publications on Sustainable WASH Systems

By: dietvorst
Afar 2016
photo: Petterik Wiggers/Hollandse Hoogte Amsterdam

The Sustainable WASH Systems (SWS) learning partnership is a collaborative activity funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to develop, test, and document high-potential “systems approaches” for local water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) service delivery. The five year project (2016-2021) in Cambodia, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda aims to provide concrete improvements to service delivery while placing a significant emphasis on building knowledge and providing evidence to USAID and the global WASH sector on how systems approaches can be applied, adapted, and scaled in different contexts.

Below are some of the most recent SWS publications:

Valcourt, N., Walters, J., Javernick-Will, A., Linden, K., and Hailegiorgis, B., 2020. Understanding rural water services as a complex system : an assessment of key factors as potential leverage points for improved service sustainability. Sustainability, 12(3), pp.1-17 : 3 fig., 3 tab.

Results from stakeholders workshops in Ethiopia and Uganda indicate that a more intentional focus on factor interactions in WASH systems could lead to more effective strategies for improving service sustainability.  Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/understanding-rural-water-services-complex-system-assessment-key-factors-potential

Hope, R., Thomson, P., Koehler, J. & Foster, T., 2020. Rethinking the economics of rural water in Africa. Oxford review of economic policy, 36(1), pp.171- 190 : 2 fig.

Why is rural water is different for communities, schools, and healthcare facilities across characteristics of scale, institutions, demand, and finance? Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/rethinking-economics-rural-water-africa

Hollander, D., Ajroud, B., Thomas, E., Peabody, S., Jordan, E., Javernick-Will, A. & Linden, K., 2020. Monitoring methods for systems-strengthening activities toward sustainable water and sanitation services in low-income settings. Sustainability, 12(17), pp.1-16 : 10 fig.

Early findings from the application of outcome mapping and system-wide assessments within the USAID-funded Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) indicate the importance of including both within an overall monitoring approach to support systems strengthening of water and sanitation services. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/monitoring-methods-systems-strengthening-activities-toward-sustainable-water-and

University of Colorado Boulder. Environmental Incentives, 2020. Defining collective action approaches in WASH. (Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. Research brief). Washington, DC, USA: USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. 4 p. : 1 tab.

This research brief presents a definition of collective action approaches and a working typology of the range of related approaches. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/defining-collective-action-approaches-wash

Harper, D., 2020. Using social network analysis in WASH programs. (Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. Learning brief). Washington, DC, USA: USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. 5 p. : 2 tab.

This learning brief summarizes the application and use of social network analysis (SNA) in the Sustainable WASH Systems (SWS) Learning Partnership in Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Cambodia. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/using-social-network-analysis-wash-programs

Pugel, K., Javernick-Will, A., Koschmann, M., Peabody, S. & Linden, K., 2020. Adapting collaborative approaches for service provision to low-income countries : expert panel results. Sustainability, 12(7), pp.1-26 : 6 fig., 2 tab.

This study contributes to both literature and practice by identifying the relative importance of factors to consider when designing collaborative approaches in low-income countries with limited governance capabilities. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/adapting-collaborative-approaches-service-provision-low-income-countries-expert-panel

Chintalapati, P., 2020. Maintenance approaches to improve the sustainability of rural water supplies. (Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. Research brief). Washington, DC, USA: USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. 7 p.

This document reviews literature about the factors influencing the sustainability of rural water services, and the emerging maintenance approaches seeking to address these factors and improve service reliability. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/maintenance-approaches-improve-sustainability-rural-water-supplies

Valcourt, N., Javernick-Will, A., Walters, J. & Linden, K., 2020. System approaches to water, sanitation, and hygiene : a systematic literature review. International journal of environmental research and public health, 17(3), pp.1-18 : 4 fig., 3 tab.

There is insufficient information in the literature to evaluate the utility and efficacy of systems approaches for improving WASH service sustainability. This article proposes recommendations for improving the evidence base. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/system-approaches-water-sanitation-and-hygiene-systematic-literature-review

McDermott, M., 2020. Ethiopia midterm organizational network analysis report. (Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. Research report). Washington, DC, USA: USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. ii, 67 : 27 fig., 16 tab.

Measuring change over time in the relationships and network structure of learning alliances in four separate Ethiopian locations in USAID’s Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/ethiopia-midterm-organizational-network-analysis-report

Ajroud, B., Hollander, D. & Peabody, S., 2020. Measuring systems change in WASH programming : a practical application of two tools. (Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. Research report). Washington, DC, USA: USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership. 31 p. : 6 boxes, 3 fig.

This report provides a guide to the practical application of outcome mapping and sustainability scorecards to monitor systems change in WASH programming. Read more: https://www.ircwash.org/resources/measuring-systems-change-wash-programming-practical-application-two-tools

For more on the Sustainable WASH Systems (SWS) learning partnership and a full list of publications go to:
https://www.globalwaters.org/sws

dietvorst

☑ ☆ ✇ Sanitation Updates

Flush Away 2020: A 5-Day Game, December 27-31, 2020

By: usaidwaterckm

From December 27 to 31, 2020, FLUSH, The Loo Tours, and The POOP Project have teamed up with Reel Paper to encourage you to let this year go. Any game participant has a chance to win an awesome raffle prize. See below for more details.

Each day will have a theme with some directions that we’ll share in videos around 6am EST / 11am GMT. You’ll have 24 hours to submit your results on Twitter and/or Instagram. Here are some hints about the 5 days of games:

  • Day 1: Toilet Paper Challenge (arts & crafts)
  • Day 2: Thank You (Sanitation Workers) Challenge (gratitude)
  • Day 3: Toilet/WC Upgrade Challenge (design)
  • Day 4: Bristol Bake-Off Challenge (baking)
  • Day 5: Final Flush Challenge (therapy)

We are judging submissions based on creativity and fun! We encourage people to think outside the box (so long as it’s tasteful).

Eligibility

Participants are eligible to participate from anywhere in the world, as long as they are over the ages of 18 years, or have at least one member who is over 18 years old.

The Grant Prize of a year’s supply of Reel bamboo toilet paper is only available for participants in the US, but we have participation prizes for people elsewhere, as well! Family members of any company and organization hosting and running this game are welcome to participate but are exempt from winning the Grand Prize.

Submission Rules

  • Social Media: Participants must post videos & pictures on Instagram (stories and/or feed posts) and/or Twitter.
  • Hashtags: Submissions must include the hashtags #FlushAway2020 and another hashtag with the name of their team to be considered eligible for inclusion.
  • One Team, One Account: Participant accounts submitting their posts has to remain the same throughout the game to make sure we can keep track of who is who! Feel free to team up with others, just note that there should be just one account for the submissions and the Grand Prize will be sent to the address of the account holder.
  • Tag Us: Oh! You should also tag us on your submissions:
  • Twitter@flush_wash | @LondonLooTours | @poop_project | @reelpaperco
  • Instagram@flushllc | @londonlootours | @poop_project | @reelpaper
  • Deadlines: Submissions for each day must be shared by 5am EST / 10am GMT the following day, sent with the same IG account. Make sure to have a decent internet connection to submit on time!
  • Raffle Prize: Teams participating will receive up to two raffle tickets per day they participate, one for submitting and one for demonstrating extra creativity or effort. The raffle tickets will be given to the account holder that submitted the posts. Submit at least two times and you already win a prize – free admission into one of the team’s events. Submit all five days and you can attend two of the team’s events for free. The grand prize will be raffled off at the end to one winner. The more you submit, the more chances you have to win!

Content Rules

  • Prove It’s You: A body part of a real, living person must be included in the post to prove you really completed the challenge.
  • Freedom to Share: Submissions are agreeing that the hosting organizations can download and use their videos and pictures for promotional use in the future (i.e., a recap video, etc.).
  • Keep it Tasteful: Pictures or videos that include real poo or sensitive materials (aka genitalia) are automatically disqualified and will be reported as abuse on social media.

Have any questions or need some more information? Feel free to email us at kim@flushwash.org.

usaidwaterckm

❌