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✇IRC Water

Des données à l'action : renforcement des pratiques de données pour améliorer les services WASH

By: Anonymous —

Les enseignements tirĂ©s par les partenaires de L'initiative Safe Water Partnership (SWP) pour identifier les moyens de renforcer l'utilisation des donnĂ©es pour la planification et la mise en Ɠuvre de programmes rĂ©actifs, durables, et de s'assurer que les parties prenantes ont accĂšs Ă  des systĂšmes de donnĂ©es utilisables et utiles.

L’initiative Safe Water Partnership (SWP) a organisĂ© une session de formation en ligne le 6 mars 2022, intitulĂ©e « Des donnĂ©es Ă  l’action : renforcement des pratiques de donnĂ©es pour amĂ©liorer les services WASH ». L’objectif de cette session interactive Ă©tait de mettre Ă  profit les enseignements tirĂ©s dans Ouganda, Ghana et Burkina Faso par les partenaires de projet au cours de leurs projets soutenus par la Fondation Conrad N. Hilton pour identifier les moyens de: 

  1. renforcer l’utilisation des donnĂ©es pour la planification et la mise en Ɠuvre de programmes rĂ©actifs, durables, et de 
  2.  s’assurer que les parties prenantes ont accĂšs Ă  des systĂšmes de donnĂ©es utilisables et utiles. 
La session a inclus des prĂ©sentations en plĂ©niĂšre faites par des partenaires Ă  l’échelle de SWP, ainsi que des discussions en petits groupes qui ont permis Ă  tous les participants d’examiner leur expĂ©rience en matiĂšre d’utilisation des donnĂ©es au sein du partenariat. 
 
Cette note d’information prĂ©sente les points saillants des meilleures pratiques et les principaux dĂ©fis partagĂ©s lors de ces prĂ©sentations en plĂ©niĂšre et des discussions en petits groupes.
✇IRC Water

Data to action : strengthening data practices to improve WASH services

By: Anonymous —

Lessons learned by Safe Water Partnership (SWP) project partners on ways to enhance the use of data for planning and implementing responsive, sustainable WASH programs, and ensuring that all stakeholders have access to usable and useful data systems.

The Safe Water Partnership (SWP) held an E-Learning session on 6 March 2022, titled ‘Data to Action: Strengthening data practices to improve WASH services.’ The goal of this interactive session was to harness lessons learned by project partners over the course of their Conrad N. Hilton Foundation supported projects to identify ways to 1) enhance the use of data for planning and implementing responsive, sustainable programs, and 2) ensure that all stakeholders have access to usable and useful data systems. The session included plenary presentations from Uganda, Ghana and Burkina Faso by partners across the SWP as well as small-group discussions that allowed all participants to discuss their experience using data within the partnership. This briefing note outlines highlights of best practices and key challenges shared during these plenary presentations and small group discussions.

✇IRC Water

Four Towns Launch New Town Sanitation Plans in Kabarole District, Uganda

By: kabarungi —

The four Town Sanitation Plans are a product of a comprehensive, participatory process initiated last year 2021 by the lower local government leadership and facilitated by IRC Uganda.

Mugusu, Kijura, Kiko and Kasenda Town Councils in Kabarole District are set to launch their new Town Sanitation Plans (TSPs) and officially kick-start implementation on 30 March 2022. The event is hosted at the Kabarole District Local Government Headquarters with Chairperson Hon. Richard Rwabuhinga as guest of honour. The town sanitation plans are a product of a comprehensive and participatory process led by the Town Council Leadership and facilitated by IRC Uganda as a way to support the district's targets of universal access to water sanitation and hygiene by 2030 as laid out in the Kabarole District WASH Masterplan.

"We are following our laid out strategies in the WASH Masterplan and we are steadily progressing towards the goal of leaving no one behind by 2030. With safe water and sanitation accessible to everyone even in the small towns and sub-counties, we reduce the disease burden substantially and can be assured of a healthy productive lifestyle for our people.  I congratulate these town councils for getting on board," Hon. Richard Rwabuhinga, Chairman Kabarole District.

 Mugusu participatory process of developing TSP

The launch will bring together key stakeholders from the Ministry of Health, regional units of the Ministry of Water and Environment, Kabarole District Local Government, technocrats and politicians from the four Town Councils, the Mid-Western Umbrella of Water and Sanitation and the National Water and Sewerage Corporation. Civil society representatives from Water For People, UWASNET, JESE, TURIKUMWE and Finish Mondial/HEWASA, the media and cultural and religious leadership are also expected to attend.

Town Sanitation Plans

The Town Sanitation Plans aim at coordinating and integrating various sanitation-related measures at the town council level including physical planning, sanitation marketing and behaviour change communication, local private sector involvement, law enforcement, and full stakeholder participation, among others. The plans contain Town Council priority issues; objectives and targets for improving sanitation; planned activities; and a financial estimation management plan for the activities. They include estimates on the required investments to be made either by the Town Council, Kabarole District Local Government, and/or donor agencies for improvements along the sanitation value chain.

The actions and interventions presented in the plans are focused on improving sanitation in households, public schools, public places (e.g., markets, bus/taxi stops), and healthcare facilities. In addition, the plans propose interventions to improve the collection and treatment of faecal sludge in the towns. The planning horizon is the year 2040 in line with the national Uganda Vision2040.

New and Complementing Projects

As part of the launch event of the Town Sanitation Plans, IRC Uganda will introduce two new projects namely the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation’s Safe Water Strategy Phase Two and the Sanitation and Hygiene Improvement project funded by the James Percy Foundation, through which a number of implementation activities laid out in the TSPs will be supported.

IRC Uganda and Kabarole District

IRC has collaborated with Kabarole District Local Government as a core district partner since 2006, and has supported efforts to research, develop and publish a district WASH master plan for Kabarole District. This master plan outlines a vision for 100% coverage of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services by 2030.

Funding Support

The development and publication of the Town Sanitation Plans for Kijura, Mugusu, Kasenda and Kiko was commissioned by IRC Uganda with funding support of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and the Waterloo Foundation.

✇IRC Water

JMP 2020, Mali improves its performance

By: Zohoun —

IRC has developed a JMP 2020 synthesis report for Mali and is sharing the results with WASH sector actors. 

According to Virginie Mahan, UNICEF WASH Specialist, the States have made commitments to achieve SDG 6 and the JMP report, a tool for monitoring these commitments at the global level, deserves to be synthesised and made more accessible to the general public. This clearly underlines the importance of IRC Mali’s initiative.

JMP exchange meeting in Mali

From left to right, Virginie Mahan Kouadio, UNICEF WASH Specialist, Selly Ouane, representative of the President of CN-CIEPA, Djoro Bocoum, National Director of Hydraulics, Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly, Country Coordinator of IRC Mali (M. Kané)

Following the example of the other UN member states, Mali has made a commitment to ensure universal access to drinking water, hygiene and sanitation services by 2030. However, 17% and 55% of the Malian population, respectively, still lack access to at least basic drinking water and sanitation services, according to the JMP 2020 report. The WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) is the official United Nations mechanism for monitoring progress at national, regional and global levels, particularly with regard to the Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG) targets on equitable access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) for all. Through its global household surveys, JMP analyses help establish the link between drinking water, sanitation and quality of life, and serve as a reference tool to inform policy decisions and resource allocation, particularly at the international level.

The JMP is therefore a key tool for monitoring performance and indicators, and the figures it presents deserve to be known by all and at all levels. With this in mind, IRC Mali felt that it was relevant to produce a summary document of the latest JMP report on Mali. This document summarises the progress made, but also the obstacles faced by Mali in its quest to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6.

Accessible to the general public and a valuable reference for all actors involved in the water and sanitation sector in Mali, the document was brought to the attention of these actors on 29 October 2021 in Bamako, during an opportunity for collective reflection created by the CN-CIEPA in partnership with IRC Mali.

Discussions at the JMP exchange meeting in Mali

The exchanges were intense and fruitful (Mr Kané)

In terms of progress, the current coverage rates are 82.5% with an increase of 1.7% per year for drinking water and 45.4% with an increase of 1.5% per year for sanitation. These tangible results show that Mali is ahead of its neighbours, Burkina Faso and Niger, in the coverage of drinking water and sanitation services. While Mali had 83% coverage for basic drinking water services in 2020, Burkina Faso and Niger each had 47%. The same was true for sanitation, 45% (Mali) compared to 22% (Burkina) and 15% (Niger). However, in terms of coverage for basic hygiene services, Niger (23%) outperformed its neighbours Mali (17%) and Burkina Faso (9%).

These figures are a measure of progress, but they are also clear proof that Mali needs a huge effort from all partners to meet the challenge of achieving SDG 6 by 2030. It is therefore imperative to accelerate the current pace and ensure immediate and integrated action to rapidly improve progress on SDG 6.

Representatives of technical services, civil society, the private sector, international NGOs and technical and financial partners of the drinking water, hygiene and sanitation sector, all participated in the exchanges on the results while formulating appropriate recommendations. These included the continuous updating of WASH sector databases, the revitalisation of the sectoral committee for the collection and monitoring of WASH indicators, and the harmonisation of WASH indicators with national indicators.

IRC Mali, through its coordinator, Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly, reiterated its commitment to the Malian authorities, while remaining true to its mission of bringing together all actors in the sector to promote resilient actions for access to WASH services through learning and influencing.

✇IRC Water

JMP 2020, le Mali améliore ses performances

By: Zohoun —

IRC élabore le rapport synthÚse du JMP 2020 au Mali et partage les résultats avec les acteurs du secteur WASH.

Selon Virginie Mahan, spĂ©cialiste WASH Ă  l'UNICEF, les Etats ont pris des engagements par rapport Ă  l’atteinte de l’ODD 6 et le rapport JMP, un instrument de suivi de ces engagements au niveau global mĂ©rite d’ĂȘtre synthĂ©tisĂ© et d’ĂȘtre plus accessible au grand public. Ceci dĂ©montre clairement la valeur de cette action de IRC Mali. 

JMP reflection meeting in Mali

De gauche à droite, Virginie Mahan Kouadio, spécialiste WASH à UNICEF, Selly Ouane, représentante du Président du CN-CIEPA, Djoro Bocoum, Directeur National de l'Hydraulique, Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly, Coordinatrice Pays de IRC Mali (M. Kané)

A l'instar d'autres Etats membres de l'Organisation des Nations Unies, le Mali a pris l’engagement d’assurer aux populations, l’accĂšs universel aux services d’eau potable, d’hygiĂšne et d’assainissement Ă  l’horizon 2030. Pourtant, respectivement 17% et 55% de la population malienne, n’ont toujours pas accĂšs Ă  des services d’eau potable et d’assainissement tout au moins basiques, d’aprĂšs le rapport JMP 2020 du Mali. En effet, le Programme commun OMS/UNICEF de suivi de l’approvisionnement en eau et de l’assainissement (JMP) est le mĂ©canisme officiel des Nations Unies chargĂ© du suivi des avancĂ©es rĂ©alisĂ©es aux niveaux, national, rĂ©gional et mondial, notamment au regard des cibles des Objectifs du DĂ©veloppement Durable (ODD) relatives Ă  l’accĂšs Ă©quitable pour tous Ă  l’eau potable, Ă  l’assainissement et Ă  l’hygiĂšne (WASH). GrĂące Ă  ses enquĂȘtes menĂ©es auprĂšs des mĂ©nages Ă  l’échelle mondiale, les analyses du JMP aident Ă  Ă©tablir le lien entre eau potable, installations sanitaires et qualitĂ© de vie, et servent d’instruments de rĂ©fĂ©rence pour Ă©clairer certaines dĂ©cisions politiques et orienter l’affectation des ressources, notamment au niveau international.

Le JMP est donc un outil capital de suivit des performances et des indicateurs, et les chiffres qu’il prĂ©sente mĂ©ritent d’ĂȘtre connus par tous et Ă  divers niveaux. C’est dans cette lancĂ©e que IRC Mali a perçu la pertinence de produire un document synthĂšse du dernier rapport JMP au Mali. Ce document rapporte de maniĂšre synthĂ©tisĂ©e les progrĂšs rĂ©alisĂ©s, mais aussi les obstacles auxquels est confrontĂ© le Mali dans sa quĂȘte pour atteindre l'Objectif du DĂ©veloppement Durable 6.

Accessible au grand public et rĂ©fĂ©rence prĂ©cieuse pour tout acteur intervenant dans le secteur de l’eau et l’assainissement au Mali, le document a Ă©tĂ© portĂ© Ă  la connaissance desdits acteurs le 29 octobre 2021 Ă  Bamako, au cours d’un espace de rĂ©flexion collective crĂ©Ă© par la CN-CIEPA en partenariat avec IRC Mali.

JMP meeting in Mali

Les échanges étaient intenses et bien nourris (M. Kané) 

A titre de progrĂšs, on retient que les taux de couverture actuels sont de 82,5% avec une progression de 1,7% par an pour l'eau potable et de 45,4% avec une progression de 1,5% par an pour l’assainissement. Ces rĂ©sultats palpables traduisent que le Mali est en avance sur ses voisins, le Burkina Faso et le Niger dans la couverture des services en eau potable et en assainissement. Pendant que le Mali affichait, en 2020, une couverture des services basiques en eau potable de 83 %, le Burkina et le Niger affichaient chacun 47 %. Il en Ă©tait de mĂȘme en assainissement, 45 % (Mali) contre 22 % (Burkina) et 15 % (Niger). Cependant, en couverture de services basiques en hygiĂšne, le Niger (23 %) dĂ©passait ses voisins le Mali (17 %) et le Burkina Faso (9 %).

Ces chiffres permettent de mesurer les avancĂ©es, mais constituent Ă©galement la preuve irrĂ©futable que le Mali a besoin d’un effort colossal de la part de tous les partenaires pour relever le dĂ©fi d’atteindre l’ODD 6 en 2030. Il devient donc impĂ©ratif d’accĂ©lĂ©rer le rythme actuel et d’assurer une action immĂ©diate et intĂ©grĂ©e pour amĂ©liorer rapidement les progrĂšs de l’ODD 6.

ReprĂ©sentants des services techniques, de la sociĂ©tĂ© civile, du secteur privĂ©, des ONG internationales et des partenaires techniques et financiers du secteur eau potable, hygiĂšne et assainissement, ils Ă©taient nombreux Ă  participer aux Ă©changes sur les rĂ©sultats tout en formulant des recommandations bien Ă  propos. S’agissant entre autres de la pĂ©rennisation de la mise Ă  jour des bases de donnĂ©es du secteur WASH, la dynamisation du comitĂ© sectoriel de la collecte et du suivi des indicateurs JMP, l’harmonisation des indicateurs JMP avec ceux nationaux.

IRC Mali par la voix de sa coordinatrice, Dr. Afou Chantal Bengaly, rĂ©itĂšre son engagement aux cĂŽtĂ©s des autoritĂ©s maliennes, tout en restant fidĂšle Ă  sa mission qui consiste Ă  rĂ©unir tous les acteurs du secteur en vue d’une promotion des actions rĂ©silientes en faveur de l’accĂšs aux services WASH Ă  travers l’apprentissage et l’influence d’actions.

 

✇IRC Water

PremiÚres activités de IRC Niger dans son nouveau focus district « Kornaka »

By: Ousmane —

IRC Niger aide la commune Kornaka à exercer les responsabilités en matiÚre d'eau et d'assainissement qui lui ont été transférées par l'Etat.

Dans le cadre de son partenariat avec la Fondation Conrad N. Hilton, IRC Niger a dĂ©cidĂ© d’assister la commune rurale de Kornaka Ă  atteindre l’objectif de dĂ©veloppement durable n°6 Ă  l’horizon 2030. La commune rurale de Kornaka est localisĂ©e dans la rĂ©gion de Maradi et dans le dĂ©partement de Dakoro (en jaune).

Map showing the location of the commune Kornaka

IRC s’engage Ă  assister la commune sur le long terme et plusieurs activitĂ©s seront menĂ©es Ă  savoir entre autres le recrutement d’un assistant technique, le dĂ©veloppement d’un plan stratĂ©gique (master plan), l’organisation d’un atelier d’évaluation des dĂ©terminants fonctionnels (building blocks) du systĂšme WASH
etc. C’est dans le cadre de cet appui institutionnel Ă  la commune que IRC a organisĂ© des ateliers de vulgarisation des documents de politiques, stratĂ©gies et programmes et des textes lĂ©gislatifs et rĂ©glementaires du secteur de l’eau et de l’assainissement. En effet, la dĂ©centralisation est dĂ©sormais une rĂ©alitĂ© au Niger et les communes font partie du paysage institutionnel nigĂ©rien.

L’Etat a dĂ©cidĂ© de transfĂ©rer un certain nombre de compĂ©tences dans le secteur WASH aux communes et pour pouvoir exercer ces compĂ©tences les Ă©lus locaux doivent au prĂ©alable avoir connaissance de ces documents et textes du secteur. C’est la raison pour laquelle IRC a organisĂ© un premier atelier du 07 au 10 mars 2022. L’atelier a regroupĂ© trente-deux (32) participants dont des conseillers municipaux, des agents de la Mairie (le maire et ses 2 premiers adjoints, le secrĂ©taire gĂ©nĂ©ral de la mairie et l’agent du service municipal eau et assainissement) et les Directeurs DĂ©partementaux de l’Hydraulique et de l’Assainissement et de l’AmĂ©nagement du Territoire et du DĂ©veloppement Communautaire.

Group photo of workshop participants

Photo de famille des participants à l'atelier qui a regroupé les conseillers municipaux, les agents de la Mairie du focus district et les Directeurs Départementaux

Du 11 au 12 mars 2022, IRC a organisĂ© un autre atelier pour les organisations de la sociĂ©tĂ© civile.  Il a regroupĂ© quinze (15) participants tous de la sociĂ©tĂ© civile Ă  savoir : le ROTAB (le RĂ©seau des Organisations pour la Transparence et l'Analyse BudgĂ©taire), Tournons la page, l’ANDDH (l’Association NigĂ©rienne pour la DĂ©fense des Droits de l’Homme), l’AUE (l’Association des Usagers de l’Eau), l’organisation des jeunes de la commune
etc. L’objectif de cet atelier Ă©tait de porter Ă  la connaissance de ces organisations les documents et textes du secteur pour qu’elles puissent dĂ©fendre les intĂ©rĂȘts de la population de la commune.

Group photo of CSO participants at the workshop

Photo de famille des participants à l'atelier qui a regroupé les organisations de la société civile du focus district

Les thématiques développées au cours de ces 2 ateliers sont :

  • le Programme Sectoriel Eau, HygiĂšne et Assainissement (PROSEHA 2016-2030) : les objectifs gĂ©nĂ©raux et spĂ©cifiques du programme, le budget, les procĂ©dures et outils de suivi-Ă©valuation
etc.
  • le code de l’eau et ses textes d’application : l’objet et le champ d’application du code de l’eau, le cadre institutionnel de la gestion de l’eau, le financement de la gestion de l’eau
etc.
  • le dĂ©cret portant transfert des compĂ©tences et des ressources de l’Etat aux communes dans le  domaine de l’hydraulique : prĂ©sentation des compĂ©tences qui sont transfĂ©rĂ©es par l’Etat aux communes dans le secteur de l’hydraulique et du cahier des charges prĂ©cisant les conditions et modalitĂ©s techniques d’exercice des compĂ©tences et des ressources transfĂ©rĂ©es par l’Etat aux communes dans le domaine de l’hydraulique et de l’assainissement 
  • le plan de transfert des compĂ©tences et des ressources de l’Etat aux communes dans le domaine de l’hydraulique et de l’assainissement ;
  • l’approche fondĂ©e sur les droits humains (AFDH) : dĂ©finition de l’approche fondĂ©e sur les droits humains, les droits humains en lien avec l’eau et l’assainissement, l’intĂ©gration de l’AFDH dans le secteur de l’eau et de l’assainissement.

En guise de conclusion on peut noter que les réactions ont été positives suite aux ateliers. Les élus locaux et les organisations de la société civile ont été satisfaits de prendre connaissance de ces documents et textes qui leur permettront de mener à bien leurs missions dans le secteur.

Il faut noter que le processus de dĂ©centralisation est limitĂ© par la faiblesse des capacitĂ©s institutionnelles et financiĂšres des communes. IRC appuiera la commune de Kornaka pour qu’elle puisse exercer les compĂ©tences du secteur WASH que l’Etat lui transfĂšre mais aussi d’atteindre l’objectif de dĂ©veloppement durable n°6 relatif Ă  l’accĂšs universel et durable aux services WASH.

Enfin, dans le but d’appuyer l’opĂ©rationnalisation du service municipal eau et assainissement de la commune, IRC a dotĂ© ce service de matĂ©riels informatiques.

Commune of Kornaka receiving equipment

Photo de la cérémonie de remise du matériel informatique en guise d'appui à l'opérationnalisation du service municipal eau et assainissement (SMEA) du focus district

✇IRC Water

Where is the money? Financing Uganda’s WASH, environment and climate change

By: kabarungi —

Tackling Uganda's WASH, environment and climate change financing gap in Uganda.

 

Financing dialogue long shot

Uganda’s socio-economic progress sits squarely on its natural environment resources as the core support for its industries, and water, sanitation and hygiene services for the livelihoods and quality of life of its people. Development experts recommend that deliberate and collaborative approaches to financing water, sanitation and hygiene services, environmental resources management, and climate change adaptability be adopted urgently if Uganda is to attain the desired socio-economic targets of its Vision 2040.  

But only 32% of the population in Uganda has access to a basic water supply and 19% to basic sanitation, with about 7 million people still defecating in the open. Moreover, despite that 80% of the population depend on agriculture for their livelihood, the effects of climate change are now evident with shorter or longer unpredictable seasons of rainfall, spells of droughts, and heavy floods.

"There is no policy framework for financing Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, Environment and Climate Change Programmes in Uganda yet they contribute substantially to the national socio-economic development, they are often taken for granted, " Alfred Okidi, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Water and Environment.

Thinking together

As such, a cross-sectoral national dialogue was on 17 December 2021 convened by the Ministry of Water and Environment (MWE) through the Water Resources Institute (WRI) in collaboration with the Civil Society Budget Advocacy Group (CSBAG), IRC, WaterAid and Water For People (WFP), to align and shape the conversation on financing the water and environment sector in Uganda.

“At IRC, we believe that services should be available, reliable, affordable to all people all the time – that’s a prerequisite to achieving Vision 2040 as a country. Finance is a key building block to get us there. Thank you, Ministry of Water and Environment for the opportunity to dialogue and collectively act to change the situation,” Jane Nabunnya Mulumba, IRC Uganda Country Director.

Themed Re-thinking Uganda’s WASH, Environment and Climate Change Financing Priorities beyond the COVID-19 Pandemic, the hybrid dialogue held in Kampala brought together over 180 professionals from government agencies, parliament, development partners, civil society, private sector, academia, and representatives of cultural institutions. 

Partners emphasised that optimum benefit of water and environment resources can only be realised if every Ugandan is reached with quality service delivery.

“Our target is no less than everyone forever – every household, school, health facility, and community must have sustainable water and sanitation services to be able to contribute to the progress of our country,” Brenda Achiro Muthemba, Country Director Water For People.

Discussions were centred on analysing the challenges faced by the sector in delivering sustainable water, environment and climate change services for the Ugandan population and the opportunities for holistic financing. Presenters emphasised the interlinked roles and systems across distinct state and non-state agencies in WASH and environment resources service delivery, catalysing the apparent need for collaborative efforts to identify practical policy and interventions to address financing gaps and address climate change challenges.

Making the case for investment in WASH, environment and climate change

According to senior economist Dr. Fred Muhumuza, the existing challenges are as vast as the opportunities that the sector can explore to triple investment in order to make the required contribution towards Uganda’s Vision 2040 and the global SDGs by 2030. In his key-note address, Muhumuza stressed the apparent need for the sector to demonstrate to financing institutions the efficacy of investing in quality services, good governance, development, and sustainable management of these resources to the social economic and political agenda of Uganda and its citizens.

“The challenge is partly in allocation. 99% of public financing for the sector through the national utilities and the Ministry of Water is centralised with only a minimal amount trickling down to the local governments where people directly expect services,” Fred Muhumuza, senior economist and keynote speaker at the national dialogue.

Uganda’s national budget landscape is complex and grossly constrained. Total expenditure for the financial year 2021/22 was planned at Shs.44,778.8 billion (US$ 12.5 billion) excluding domestic debt refinancing. But allocation for water, sanitation, hygiene, and environment is not only low but is also diminishing. The sector’s on-budget share of the national budget decreased from 4.03% (UGX 1,263bn (US$ 353M)) budget funding in the FY 2019/20 against the national budget of UGX 25,093bn (US$ 7bn) in the FY 2018/19 to 2.73% ( UGX 1,105.72bn (US$ 309M)) on budget funding in the FY 2019/20 against the national budget of UGX 40,489bn (US$ 11.3bn), according to the 2020 Sector Performance Report.

As nations the world over focus on economic recovery due to the COVID-19 impact, the sector in Uganda is grappling with increased interest rates on external resources and a political landscape that has prioritised hefty budgets for regional security at the expense of WASH and natural resources.

Global resource flows are diminishing, with adaptation financing to Africa projected to a mere US$ 66bn for 2020-2030. This is short of the US$ 331bn (or approximately US$ 33bn annually) in estimated needs per stated cost estimates in nationally determined contributions (NCDs). In East Africa, water received only 17% of the US$ 1.76bn in 2017-2018

Paradoxically, COVID-19 stimuli fell short on water, environment, and climate change, leading to a decline in private sector investment and overall impact on the economy.

Civil society advocates retaliated that while national resource envelopes may be constrained, Ugandans have the right to access services and the government the responsibility to deliver WASH and sustainable environment services. But the sector must put in more effort in positioning itself not only as viable but also as a critical sector.

“Who knew that a pandemic of the magnitude of COVID would come? But when it did, the money for response and action was found. Why not water and environment? You must be intentional in tapping into the available resources whether public or private  to invest in the sector,” Julius Mukunda, Executive Director CSBAG.

Mukunda challenged government to ensure that the water points are functional and that information on funds available for the water department at local government level is displayed for accountability purposes.

Panel discussion

Conveners L-R_CSBAG, MWE, IRC and WFP

There was consensus that COVID-19 has illuminated the importance of access to safe water and a clean environment for everyone. Investing in clean and safe water and improved sanitation facilities and hygiene practices can bring a return of 21 times their cost, according to a WaterAid report.

Uganda’s core industries namely agriculture, manufacturing, hydropower generation, marine transport, fisheries, waste discharge, tourism, and environmental conservation all depend on water.

But supply of safe water for domestic use remains low with rural areas at 71% and large towns at 79%. Similarly, water storage capacity for productive uses such as irrigation, livestock and other uses remains low. Increased investment in safe water and sanitation service delivery will reduce the disease burden, save productive time spent by women and youth on collecting water for home use and promote sector-based employment and wealth creation.

Increasingly, water, environmental and natural resources are suffering degradation due to increased demand for agricultural land, settlement, and infrastructure development. Well-managed wetlands, river-banks and forests will boost communities’ resilience to extreme weather events such as prolonged droughts and floods.

The dialogue was also an opportunity to articulate the intricacies of sustainability of services vis-Ă -vis the issues of affordability, operations and maintenance. While political representatives claim that communities are too poor to afford water bills, technocrats point to behavioural attitudes that push water users to undermine their duty to contribute to sustainable services through user fees. The point of agreement, however, was on the need to extend this conversation to those that are directly affected

“What is a green economy to a local person in my constituency? I challenge you experts to take this dialogue down to the people, explain climate change and sustainability in the language they understand and explain how they can benefit!" Dickson Kateshumbwa, Member of Parliament and serving on the Natural Resources Committee of Parliament.

Where is the money?

The identified opportunities for financing water, sanitation, hygiene, environment and climate change include:

  • Commitments from the IMF to finance climate risk mitigation. Adaptation finance from the Multilateral Development Banks (MDB) to Sub-Saharan Africa increased to US$ 4.7bn in 2020, compared to US$ 3.6bn in 2019.
  • Tap into new innovative financing models now available for Africa. For example, the Global Center on Adaptation (GCA) and the AfDB have jointly developed the African Adaptation Acceleration Program (AAAP).
  • Policy and practice: There are opportunities for promoting green economy through strengthening the interface between public and private sectors.
  • Local financing products: Small and medium enterprises can access financing from private institutions as equity, lease, corporate-social responsibility, credit, guarantees, and asset-based lending.
  • Pro-citizens governance through Water User Committees: Communities can mobilise user fees and member contributions for operations and maintenance.
  • Direct donor funding through non-profit project implementation and grants to government agencies.
  • Pension funds, social security, healthcare, and private fund managers: Long-term credit, and equity investment. Models that link financing of Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, Environment and Climate Change to reducing costs or increasing revenues will play a core role in attracting private finance.
  • Pooled financing models in partnership with the private sector and users can bring all actors together in financing, and partner with revolving finance actors.
  • Capital market financing: build capacity to develop bankable projects and capacity of entities to participate in capital markets. 

Jane N Mulumba in media interview at dialogue

Conclusion and recommendations

Water supply, sanitation and hygiene, and environment and natural resources are interlinked and require sustainable exploitation and management to ensure that there is adequate water of the right quality and quantity for both production and domestic use even during the dry seasons. Optimum yet sustainable utilisation of these resources is central to national development and therefore financing and investment should be intentional and adequate. It is paramount that existing national, regional and global legislation for the protection and sustainable use of these resources is implemented.

In the quest for financing, stakeholders are cautioned to be mindful of the safety of the ecosystem for posterity.  “It is more expensive to restore wetlands than to protect what we have. Consider, is it cheaper to import sugar than to cut down a forest to plant sugar cane?” Fred Muhumuza, keynote speaker.

The dialogue made a number of recommendations for consideration by the relevant stakeholders as follows:

a)              Ministry of Water and Environment

  • Improve the planning, enforcement, and supervision of water, sanitation, hygiene, environment and climate change to ensure that services reach the people
  • Demonstrate value for money and give priority to monitoring the effective and efficient use of resources
  • Consider development and promotion of alternative water source options that are affordable for the poor
  • Strengthen partnerships: improve governance and avail information about the sector and partner with those that can speak out to be able to get support from various actors
  • Build capacity of the ministry departments and agencies (MDAs) to take advantage of available options for financing
  • Generate and provide credible sector data and information to inform planning by relevant line Ministries of Education and Health.
  • Popularise the revised environment and climate change policies to all stakeholders. 

b)             Ministry of Finance Planning and Economic Development

  • Institute legal and regulatory reforms to create an enabling environment for private sector engagement including amending the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets (PPDA) and Local Government Act
  • Re-orient the capital market in Uganda to be viable investment vehicles for areas that provide multiple benefits like water and environment resources  
  • Government should strengthen technical capacity and increase financial resources for the department to fully coordinate all MDAs to plan, budget, and implement all WASH and climate change interventions across programmes.
  • Support the Ministry of Water and Environment to conduct a Cost Benefit Analysis of water, environment, and climate change and its impact on the overall economy of the country.

c)              Budget and Natural resources Committees of Parliament

  • Demand climate change certification before approval of ministry budgets as provided for in the Climate Change Act
  • There is a need to strengthen the capacity of government agencies and more specifically Local Governments in WASH, environment, and climate finance funding proposal development. 
✇IRC Water

Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership - Legacy page

By: Anonymous —

This legacy page gives a brief overview of the project approach and flagship publications.

Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership 2016 - 2021

The Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) was a global United States Agency for International Development (USAID) cooperative agreement to identify locally driven solutions for developing robust local systems capable of sustaining water and sanitation service delivery. Led by the University of Colorado Boulder, SWS emphasised partnerships and learning for catalytic change in the sector. The project was working in four priority countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Cambodia) to meet the rapidly increasing needs of USAID’s partner countries in getting sustainable water and sanitation services.

Approach

There were four concept teams within the partnership.

Concept 1 - improve decentralized WASH service delivery by understanding and influencing local systems led by IRC WASH working with Tetra Tech and LINC in Uganda and Ethiopia.

The team worked with stakeholders – in learning alliances - to strengthen decentralized woreda (district) and small-town level systems for water and sanitation services delivery. Comprehensive systems analyses provided a basis for action research to find new solutions to service delivery and sustainability challenges. Emphasis was placed on strengthening the WASH service delivery system as a whole, finding a balance between competing priorities to extend, improve and sustain services, and delivering the capacity development and communications activities that are needed at local, regional, and national levels to scale up successful innovations and outcomes.

Concept 2 - develop a locally led infrastructure to coordinate WASH sector (particularly donor-financed) activities in the implementation of national strategies and action plans led by WaterSHED Asia and LINC in Cambodia.

Concept 3 & 4 - test, revise, and scale up public-private partnership models that improve WASH service delivery led by Whave, UNICEF/Kenya & Oxford in Kenya.


Flagship knowledge products

Driving Change: Strengthening Local Systems in the Water and Sanitation Sectors (Dec. 2021)

This publication is a guide and reference book for those looking to understand how local systems strengthening can really be achieved. It presents three key pillars: understanding systems, learning alliances, and action-research, and demonstrates them through five case studies. The guide concludes with a series of tips, tricks, and nuggets of wisdom from the SWS Concept 1 team.

Driving Change: WASH Systems Academy course (expected publication in 2022)

Upcoming WASH Systems Academy course on facilitating local systems change in WASH.

Journal articles
Videos
Blogs

For all news, blogs and resources on the Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership, check out this link. And more on the other project concepts can be found on Globalwaters.org.


USAID logo      SWS logo

✇IRC Water

A learning-based model for entrepreneurial support in the WASH sector

By: Zohoun —

IRC Burkina aims to strengthen the knowledge of young entrepreneurs who can have a direct impact on improving WASH services.

Since 2019, IRC has been implementing a strategy to support young entrepreneurs in the WASH sector in Banfora, through a technical support/advisory approach based on incubation. For three consecutive years, the programmeme has been building the capacity of young people, through technical support on the development and implementation of innovative projects in the WASH sector. Supported by the Banfora town hall and accompanied by other partners including Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and Espace Culturel Gambidi (ECG).

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé, young WASH project leader and beneficiary of the incubator programmeme initiated by IRC, presents his project and vision during a coaching session (Ph. A. Traoré)

The incubator programme for drinking water, hygiene and sanitation projects in Banfora aims above all to support the municipality of Banfora in the implementation of its communal strategic plan for public drinking water and sanitation services by 2030 by involving private sector actors. IRC's support aims to strengthen the knowledge of young actors who can have a direct and significant impact on improving WASH services. This capacity building should lead to the transformation of project ideas into start-up businesses and project holders into young entrepreneurs. According to Juste Nansi, Country Director of IRC Burkina, “it is appropriate to focus during the sessions on the mobilisation of local resources and the sustainability of businesses through profitability.  The idea behind this type of initiative is to turn these young entrepreneurs into leaders on whom to rely for carrying out actions in the sector.”

Five projects were selected out of the 30 received in the first phase of the programme, which ended in 2020, and they were admitted into the SiraLabs incubator.  This first phase of the programme allowed participants to mature their project ideas, to validate the viability and profitability of their entrepreneurial projects and ended with the drafting of business plans. The second phase of the process, which started at the beginning of 2021, was mainly aimed at ensuring the adequacy of the prototype of the projects and the needs of the market; reinforcing the managerial capacities of the future entrepreneurs and support them in the formalising their projects.

For example, Bamba Aboubakar Idrisse is the initiator of a project to provide mobile toilets in public places in Banfora. “It all started with an observation. As part of our collaboration with young traders, we created the association of young traders of Banfora. One evening, during a team meeting at the big market in Banfora, I noticed that all those who wanted to relieve themselves had nowhere to go because there were no latrines nearby. So I decided to find a solution for this problem while generating income. Thanks to IRC’s programme, I received support from the SiraLabs incubator. Today, thanks to the training, coaching and mentoring, and technical support I received, I was able to better understand the ins and outs of implementing a project and I am now able to go out and seek funding to make my business a reality.”

From left to right, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain and BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, both project leaders (Ph, A. Traoré)

From left to right, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain and BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, both project leaders (Ph, A. Traoré)

According to Issiaka Boreaud, who is in charge of implementing the programme at SiraLabs, throughout the process, the project promoters benefited from personalised follow-up to receive answers to the problems of creating or managing and developing a business. "During regular meetings, I listened to the young future entrepreneurs to guide them, support them in their efforts, give them the benefit of my experience and make my contacts available to them," he said enthusiastically.

The approach was very participatory with active involvement of the learners and sufficiently practical, supported by the sharing of experiences of all stakeholders and the creation of business management tools. Individual coaching sessions were part of the training provided. It was also an opportunity to learn how to improve productivity and optimise returns in a business. Thanks to the programme, the steps concerning the legal form of the enterprises were initiated, allowing two of the participants to officially formalise their start-ups at the Centre de Formalités des Entreprises (CEFORE) in Banfora and obtain the related fiscal and authentication documents. This is an essential step in the creation of a company in the Burkinabe context and is a good start for the rest of the process and should be followed by the search for funding for the realisation of projects. In this context, the entrepreneurs had the opportunity to meet with the heads of the national funds in Banfora, notably the Fonds d'Appui aux Initiatives des Jeunes (FAIJ) and the Fonds d'Appui à la Promotion de l'Emploi (FAPE) on December 27, 2021. The session continued with a presentation of the financing opportunities available in the entrepreneurial system in Burkina Faso and a theoretical and practical phase on the project pitch.

“The next step is to follow these projects closely to see how the companies will be set up and how they will perform in the market. IRC plans to provide technical support in collaboration with its partner SiraLabs, to follow them and strengthen their capacities to manage their companies.”, said Benjamine ParĂ©, Senior WASH Governance Expert at IRC. 

Furthermore, IRC intends to explore with ONEA and Vergnet, who are now in charge of managing drinking water in rural areas in Banfora, the possibilities of involving young entrepreneurs in the provision of drinking water services. To this end, a brainstorming workshop may be organised by the end of 2022 in collaboration with SiraLabs, Vergnet, ONEA, the Banfora town hall, and CRS to closely examine opportunities for a new round of WASH project incubation by 2025.

✇IRC Water

Un modĂšle d’accompagnement entrepreneurial fondĂ© sur l’apprentissage dans le secteur WASH

By: Zohoun —

IRC Burkina vise à renforcer les connaissances des jeunes acteurs qui peuvent avoir un impact direct sur l'amélioration des services WASH.

IRC a initiĂ© depuis 2019 une stratĂ©gie d’appui aux jeunes entrepreneurs dans le secteur WASH Ă  Banfora, Ă  travers une approche d’appui technique /appui conseil, basĂ©e sur l’incubation. PortĂ© par la mairie de Banfora et accompagnĂ© par d’autres partenaires dont CRS et ECG, le programme a ƓuvrĂ© trois annĂ©es consĂ©cutives au renforcement de capacitĂ©s des jeunes, Ă  travers l’accompagnement technique pour l’élaboration et la mise en Ɠuvre de projets innovants dans le secteur WASH.  

KINDA Hervé Nontomdé

KINDA HervĂ© NontomdĂ©, jeune porteur de projet WASH et bĂ©nĂ©ficiaire du programme incubateur initiĂ© par IRC, prĂ©sente son projet et sa vision au cours d’une sĂ©ance de coaching (Ph. A. TraorĂ©)

Le programme incubateur des projets d’eau potable, d’hygiĂšne et d’assainissement Ă  Banfora vise avant tout Ă  accompagner la commune de Banfora dans la mise en Ɠuvre de son plan stratĂ©gique communal des services publics d’eau potable et d’assainissement Ă  l’horizon 2030, par la mise Ă  contribution des acteurs du secteur privĂ©. L’appui d’IRC vise Ă  renforcer les connaissances des jeunes acteurs qui peuvent avoir un impact direct et significatif sur l’amĂ©lioration des services WASH. Ce renforcement de capacitĂ©s devrait aboutir Ă  la transformation des idĂ©es de projet en entreprise naissante « Start-Up » et des porteurs de projets en jeunes chefs d’entreprises « Entrepreneurs ». D’aprĂšs Juste Nansi, Directeur pays de IRC Burkina, « il convient de mettre l’accent au cours des sessions, sur la mobilisation des ressources endogĂšnes et la durabilitĂ© des entreprises Ă  travers la rentabilitĂ©.  Car l’idĂ©e derriĂšre ce genre d’initiative est de pouvoir faire de ces jeunes entrepreneurs des leaders sur lesquels s’appuyer pour le portage des actions dans le secteur. »

Cinq projets ont Ă©tĂ© sĂ©lectionnĂ©s sur les 30 reçus, issus de la premiĂšre phase du programme qui a pris fin en 2020, et admis au sein de l’incubateur SiraLabs.  En effet, la premiĂšre phase du programme a permis aux participants de murir leurs idĂ©es de projets, de valider la viabilitĂ© et la rentabilitĂ© de leurs projets entrepreneuriaux et s’est soldĂ©e par la rĂ©daction de plans d’affaires. La deuxiĂšme phase du processus qui a dĂ©marrĂ© en dĂ©but d’annĂ©e 2021 visait principalement Ă  assurer l’adĂ©quation prototype des projets et besoins du marché ; renforcer les capacitĂ©s managĂ©riales des futures chefs d’entreprise et les accompagner Ă  la formalisation de leurs projets.

A titre illustratif, Bamba Aboubakar Idrisse est porteur d’un projet de mise Ă  disposition des toilettes mobiles dans les lieux publics Ă  Banfora. « Tout est parti d’un constat. Dans le cadre de notre collaboration avec des jeunes commerçants, nous avons crĂ©Ă© l’association des jeunes commerçants de Banfora. Un soir, au cours d’une rĂ©union d’équipe au grand marchĂ© de Banfora, j’ai remarquĂ© que tous ceux qui avaient envie de se soulager n’avaient aucun endroit pour faire leurs besoins parce qu’il n’y avait pas de latrines Ă  proximitĂ©. J’ai donc dĂ©cidĂ© de trouver une solution pour rĂ©soudre ce problĂšme tout en produisant des revenus. Avec ce programme de IRC, J’ai bĂ©nĂ©ficiĂ© de l’appui de l’incubateur SiraLabs. Aujourd’hui, grĂące aux formations, coaching et mentorat, Ă  l’accompagnement technique dont j’ai bĂ©nĂ©ficiĂ©, j’ai pu mieux comprendre les contours de la mise en Ɠuvre d’un projet dans toute sa globalitĂ© et je suis maintenant capable d’aller Ă  la recherche de financement pour concrĂ©tiser mon entreprise. »

De gauche à droite, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain et BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, tous deux porteurs de projet (Ph, A. Traoré)

De gauche à droite, OUEDRAOGO Frank Alain et BAMBA Aboubakar Idrisse, tous deux porteurs de projet (Ph, A. Traoré)

Selon Issiaka Boreaud, en charge de la mise en Ɠuvre du programme Ă  SiraLabs, durant tout le processus, les promoteurs de projet ont bĂ©nĂ©ficiĂ© d’un suivi personnalisĂ© pour recevoir des rĂ©ponses aux problĂ©matiques de crĂ©ation ou de gestion et dĂ©veloppement d’entreprise. « Au cours d’entretiens rĂ©guliers, j’étais Ă  l’écoute des jeunes futurs chefs d’entreprise pour les orienter, les soutenir dans leurs dĂ©marches, les faire bĂ©nĂ©ficier de mon expĂ©rience et mettre Ă  leur disposition mon tissu relationnel. » a-t-il affirmĂ© avec enthousiasme.

L’approche Ă©tait trĂšs participative avec une implication active des apprenants et suffisamment pratique, appuyĂ©e par le partage d’expĂ©riences de toutes les parties prenantes et des travaux de construction et de montage des outils de gestion d’entreprise. En appui aux formations dispensĂ©es, des sĂ©ances de coaching individuel ont accompagnĂ© le processus. C’était aussi l’occasion d’apprendre comment amĂ©liorer sa productivitĂ© et optimiser les rendements dans une entreprise. GrĂące au programme, les dĂ©marches concernant la forme juridique des entreprises ont Ă©tĂ© amorcĂ©es, permettant ainsi Ă  deux des promoteurs de formaliser officiellement leurs startups au Centre de FormalitĂ©s des Entreprises (CEFORE) Banfora et obtenir les documents fiscaux et d’authenticitĂ© y affĂ©rents. Cette action, Ă©tape indispensable Ă  la crĂ©ation d’une entreprise dans le contexte burkinabĂš, est un bon dĂ©but pour la suite du processus et devrait ĂȘtre suivie de la recherche de financement pour la concrĂ©tisation des projets. Dans ce cadre, les entrepreneurs ont eu l’occasion de rencontrer les responsables des fonds nationaux de Banfora notamment le Fonds d'Appui aux Initiatives des Jeunes (FAIJ) et le Fonds d'Appui Ă  la Promotion de l'Emploi (FAPE) le 27 dĂ©cembre 2021. La session s’est poursuivie par la prĂ©sentation des opportunitĂ©s de financement existant dans l’écosystĂšme entrepreneurial au Burkina Faso et une phase thĂ©orique et pratique sur le pitch du projet.

« La suite c’est de suivre ces projets de prĂšs pour voir comment les entreprises vont se mettre en place et comment elles vont se comporter sur le marchĂ©. IRC envisage un accompagnement technique en collaboration avec son partenaire SiraLabs, pour les suivre et renforcer leurs capacitĂ©s au cours de la gestion des entreprises. » a prĂ©cisĂ© Benjamine ParĂ©, Expert SĂ©nior en gouvernance WASH Ă  IRC.

Du reste, IRC compte explorer avec l’ONEA et Vergnet, dĂ©sormais en charge de la gestion de l’eau potable en milieu rural Ă  Banfora, des possibilitĂ©s d’implication des jeunes entrepreneurs dans la fourniture des services d’eau potable. Ainsi, un atelier brainstorming pourra ĂȘtre organisĂ© Ă  cet effet, d’ici Ă  la fin de l’annĂ©e 2022 en collaboration avec SiraLabs, Vergnet, l’ONEA, la mairie de Banfora et CRS afin d’examiner de prĂšs les opportunitĂ©s en vue d’un nouveau cycle d’incubation de projets WASH Ă  l’horizon 2025.

✇IRC Water

Capitalisation fact sheet: Synergy of action initiated by IRC in Banfora

By: Anonymous —

A collaboration was initiated between IRC, the Gambidi Cultural Centre (GCC), Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and the CDC Foundation for implementing the Water, Hygiene and Sanitation Strategic Plan of the municipality of Banfora. The collaboration aims to create synergy between the various actions of these partners in the water and sanitation sector in Banfora, to achieve the common objective of "Making Banfora the national reference in the water and sanitation sector by 2030." This has resulted in the development of a Memorandum of Understanding between the parties. Monthly and quarterly meetings are organised for monitoring and joint planning of actions. This collaboration has allowed IRC, CRS and the GCC to work together on several initiatives such as the incubation programme for young WASH project leaders in Banfora.

✇IRC Water

Baka Dawla Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

By: Anonymous —

The WASH SDG plan for Baka Dawla Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). Baka Dawla Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's Regional State (SNNPR), Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into eleven (11) rural and one (1) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 82,997 (78,900 rural and 4,097 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 30%, 20%, and 0%, respectively, in schools, and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service levels of 21%, 0%, 0%, 7%, and 0%, respectively, in health care facilities.

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Baka Dawla Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Baka Dawla Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

✇IRC Water

Woba Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

By: Anonymous —

The WASH SDG plan for Woba Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS).

Woba Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's Regional State (SNNPR), Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into ten (10) rural and one (1) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 66,466 (63,620 rural and 2,846 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 9%, 9%, and 0% respectively in the schools and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 8%, 0%, 0%, 8%, and 0% respectively, in health care facilities

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Woba Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Woba Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda.

✇IRC Water

South Ari woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

By: Anonymous —

The WASH SDG plan for South Ari Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling of quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing

process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH. The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS).

South Ari Woreda is located in South Omo Zone of Southern Nations, Nationalities and People's (SNNP) Regional State, Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into twenty-eight (28) rural and three (3) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 177,136 (149,510 rural and 12,096 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 2.9%.

The Woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current WASH service of 35%, 19%, and 0% respectively in the schools and WASH, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 21%, 0%, 8%, 16%, and 0% respectively, in health care facilities.

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of South Ari Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of South Ari Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

✇IRC Water

Mille woreda WASH Sustainable Development Goal master plan

By: Anonymous —

The WASH SDG plan for Mille Woreda has been developed by the planning team drawn from district WASH sector offices of water, education, health, finance, administration, and women and children affairs. To support the planning process, IRC WASH developed Microsoft Excel-based planning tools. The aim of the tools is to support the handling of quantitative data systematically and support the strategic planning and costing process of going from the current service to the desired, as per the agreed vision. The planning process involved a series of workshops with coaching and evaluation activities in between these workshops led by IRC WASH.

The WASH SDG master plan is prepared and owned by the woreda WASH sector offices with technical support from IRC WASH through USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS). Mille Woreda is located in Afar Regional State, Ethiopia. Administratively, the woreda is divided into ten (10) rural and two (2) urban kebeles. The total population of the woreda is 113,914 (91,827 rural and 22,087 urban). The annual population growth rate of the woreda is 3%.

The woreda has also set the vision of achieving 100% coverage with basic WASH services for all schools and health care facilities by 2030. This is a big step up from the current water, sanitation, and hygiene service of 25%, 0%, and 0% respectively in the schools and water, sanitation, hygiene, waste management, and environmental cleaning service of 12%, 0%, 12%, 24%, and 12% respectively, in health care facilities

This woreda WASH master plan contains the vision and strategies of Mille Woreda. This master plan aims for universal access to safe and sustainable water supply and sanitation and hygiene services for the entire population of Mille Woreda by 2030. The master plan provides a strategy towards achieving the set goals and visions for WASH in the woreda

✇IRC Water

Collaboration with local government : experience from WASH First COVID-19 Response Project

By: Anonymous —

An overview of phase II activities in Negelle Arsi and Shashamane districts in Ethiopia..

The paper provides an overview of activities in the WASH First COVID-19 response project which is in phase II of implementation in Negelle Arsi and Shashamane districts in Ethiopia. Project partners are Amref Health Africa, WASH SDG 6 programme and IRC.

✇IRC Water

IRC and partners convene equity and inclusion side event at Mole WASH Conference XXXII

By: awumbei —

The side-session on equity and inclusion was opened with a short video documentary on reaching the hard-to-access communities and schools in Asutifi North District of the Ahafo Region of Ghana.

IRC Ghana in collaboration with the coalition of NGOs in water and sanitation (CONIWAS) and equity and inclusion champions convened a talk-show side event on the theme, ‘Strong WASH system needs equitable and inclusive effort to deliver the SDG targets’ at the 32nd edition of the Mole Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conference on November 3, 2021, in Ejisu near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

 Vida Duti, IRC Country Director Ghana, second from right

Vida Duti, IRC Ghana Country Director stated in her opening comments as one of the expert panel discussants, “ensuring universal access to safe and affordable WASH for all by 2030 requires strong WASH systems to deliver the targets. And strong WASH systems rely on equitable and inclusive multiple actors to deliver safe and sustainable WASH services to everyone.” She used the analogy of a radio set that requires functional parts to be fully operational to further explain the WASH system, stating that the relevant building blocks need to be in place and strengthened to enable the delivery of WASH services to all.

“This interactive talk show session with sector champions helps to practically unpack equity and inclusion issues within the context of WASH systems strengthening, share experiences and reflect on how to reach the hard-to-reach and the excluded; and also what various actors need to know and do to ensure inclusive advance towards universal access - leaving no one behind,” Vida added.

To set the context for the one-and-half hour side session, a short video documentary on reaching the hard-to-access communities and schools in Asutifi North District of the Ahafo Region of Ghana was shown, highlighting the WASH situation of the excluded schools and communities and the drive under the Asutifi North Ahonedia Mpuntuo (ANAM) initiative to achieve services for everyone by 2030.

Two presenters at the side event of Mole Conference XXXII 

Umaru-Sanda Amadu, a popular local radio and television presenter with Accra based CitiFM/ TV facilitated the follow-up expert panel talk show featuring Yaw Obeng-Poku, Director at the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources; Vida Duti, IRC Country Director; Awudu Modoc, Executive Director, Afram Plains Development Organisation; Victoria Norgbey, Executive Director, Apex Body of Women in Poultry Value Chain; and Emmanuel Marfo, CEO of Global Alliance for Development Foundation.

Talk show Reflections

The talk-show delved into WASH sector progress status, the WASH system, equity and inclusion in WASH issues - barriers to inclusion and what it takes to bridge the gaps. The session also elicited expert panel perspectives to deepen awareness and interest around the challenges of inclusion to inform the advocacy for all-inclusive WASH prioritisation and action towards achieving Sustainable Development Goal 6.

The discussants acknowledged that Ghana is making steady progress towards achieving the WASH targets and a range of social protection and inclusion programmes developed and being implemented, and that lingering exclusions and equity issues indicate the need to intensify more targeted and harmonised advocacy efforts towards establishing inclusive and resilient delivery mechanisms for WASH services to all – including hard-to-access communities and inner-city residents.

The session reflected on the commitment of the country to achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all – noting that a safely managed drinking water service is from an improved source that is located on premises, available when needed and free from contamination. It was admitted that unless deliberate and inclusive measures are taken to accelerate accessibility on premises whilst reaching the hard-to-access communities, achieving safely managed and universal coverage targets may prove difficult.

Discussion during the side event at the Mole Conference XXXII

The interactive session called for, i) an appropriate and innovative mix of water supply technologies and user-friendly delivery methods to be deployed in hard-to-access communities to provide safe water to everyone in an equitable manner; ii) a systems approach backed by enabling environment is needed to entice and motivate social enterprises and private sector investments and partnerships to accelerate WASH service delivery to all; iii) continuous community sensitisation on issues of equity and inclusion and periodic capacity enhancement of water and sanitation management teams for effective operation and maintenance of water facilities; and iv) research, innovation and learning on good inclusion practices, models, approaches and technologies should be documented and promoted for uptake and replication.

The side session further called on the Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources to consider equity and inclusion issues in the ongoing sector policy reviews; revise the Ghana WASH sector gender mainstreaming guidelines and toolkit; and to co-ordinate the roll-out training and mainstreaming into WASH plans and processes at all levels.

In his short remarks, Attah Arhin, chairman of CONIWAS assured participants that matters arising from the discussions and the recommendations made will inform the conference communiqué. He pledged the commitment of the coalition in working with partners like IRC to uphold issues of inclusion, empower citizens and collectively advocate for the elimination of barriers to social inclusion.

Umaru-Sanda Amadu brought the session to a close with a call on participants to continue to reflect as individuals and institutions on how to ensure inclusive advance towards universal access bearing in mind that - “Inclusion is not just about improving access to services for those who are currently excluded but also empowering people to engage in wider processes of decision making to ensure that their rights and needs are recognised."

About fifty (50) stakeholders drawn from local and national government institutions, private sector, research institutions, local and international NGOs, and the media were at the side event. Overall, the side event was considered by most participants as very interactive and revealing.

✇IRC Water

Driving the change together: transforming local WASH systems

By: kabarungi —

Kabarole District and IRC Uganda wrap up a successful Sustainable WASH Systems (SWS) learning partnership, a collaborative project that has harnessed decentralised systems and structures to strengthen rural water supply and small-town sanitation services.

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) SWS Learning Partnership, IRC facilitated the Kabarole District WASH Task Team (DWTT) to adopt the learning alliance approach and transform into a platform for reflection, experiential learning and sharing, action research, planning, and monitoring, as well as advocacy and influencing for policies that promote Kabarole’s goal of universal access by 2030.

“The learning alliance approach broadened our space and capacity to coordinate every stakeholder – whether individual or institution – to contribute to the vision: it is like building the kingdom of God with each one of us bringing a different but critical brick to the construction site,” Richard Rwabuhinga, LC5 Chairman Kabarole DLG and member of the DWTT.

The DWTT membership comprises of political leaders and technical officers of the local government as well as private sector, civil society, religious institutions, and the media. Over the past five years, the DWTT has thrived as the bridge that connects service users to the providers, grassroot associations to sub-national agencies, and private entrepreneurs to policy makers, towards achieving Kabarole’s shared WASH agenda. 

 Milestones along the journey

The first major undertaking of the DWTT was to steer the development of the Kabarole District WASH master plan 2017 - 2030:  a blueprint of what needs to be done by when, how much it will cost to deliver safe and full water, sanitation, and hygiene services to all the people of Kabarole.

“We are keeping track of the targets and influencing for budget allocation to least served populations. As the Chairman of the WASH task team as well as Secretary for Works and Technical Services, I provide background information during the committee of council seating to ensure that we incorporate the proposals and targets of the WASH master plan,” Aaron Byakutaaga, Chairman DWTT.

There is now more deliberate connection between the demand and supply loops of WASH services in the district. On the demand side, communities through their water user committees have acquired skills to collect and save money for operations and maintenance. On the supply side, hand pump mechanics have benefited from the learning opportunities and capacity strengthening organised by the DWTT.

“They [DWTT] do not just tell us what to do, but they show us what is working elsewhere, and support us to replicate. They took us on a peer learning visit to Kamuli district. Today, KAHASA is the go-to service provider in the community for operations and maintenance for pay-as-you-fetch water points,” Stephen Balyebuga, Publicity Secretary, Kabarole Handpump Mechanics Association (KAHASA).

Looking ahead

The project time may be over but learning and transformation continues. The DWTT envisages itself as a forum that will continue to coordinate stakeholders, influence policy and mobilise resources to drive safe water supply and sustainable sanitation in Kabarole.

“At IRC, we know from experience and evidence that no single person or entity can create lasting solutions for the immense WASH challenges. We applaud the Kabarole DWTT for driving a shared vision and providing a befitting platform for advocacy and influencing not only for universal access, but for safe, sustainable water and sanitation services that last. It is a living example that learning alliances work and should be replicated in all the districts of Uganda, ” Jane Nabunnya Mulumba, Country Director IRC Uganda.

✇IRC Water

Ruteete Health Centre III receives only licensed medical waste incinerator in Kabarole District, Uganda

By: Nabunnya —

Cleaner at Ruteete Health Centre III

A much needed medical waste incinerator for safe disposal was commissioned for Ruteete Health Centre III in Kabarole District, Uganda.

Anthony Tweheyo, a cleaner at Ruteete HCIII was trained and now takes on responsibility as operator of the incinerator.
Photo by Naomi W. Kabarungi/IRC Uganda

Over the last couple of years as the world has been dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) practises in health care facilities (HCFs) has become even more pronounced. While we did not anticipate the pandemic, our interventions in our partner district Kabarole benefited from the baseline study on the state of WASH in health care facilities in Kabarole District. This study was  conducted in 2019 jointly by IRC, Kabarole District Health Department and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It revealed enormous gaps with regard to governance and access to WASH and Infection, Prevention and Control (IPC) services. 

The study made recommendations to ensure safety of health care workers, patients and care givers by installing facilities to ensure uninterrupted safe water supply, access to safe sanitation facilities, handwashing facilities in key patient care points, and professional medical waste management including colour coding, waste segregation and safe elimination of sharps waste and non-sharps infectious waste in covered, lined pits or incinerators that are inaccessible to the public.

Guided by the recommendations, IRC has since supported the district with a number of initiatives including the provision of handwashing facilities, safe water filters for drinking water and Personal Protection Equipment (N95 respirators masks, surgical masks, gloves, temperature guns, gum boots, aprons, overalls) to all the 54 HCFs. IRC has also supported the construction and rehabilitation of safe sanitation facilities in several HCFs, and the production and distribution of Alcohol Based Hand Rub (ABHR).

Colour-coded bins for waste segregation at Ruteete

Colour-coded bins for waste segregation at Ruteete. It is a standard requirement by MOH for all HCFs to ensure separation of waste according to safety levels.

Most of these interventions were contributions to existing efforts. While waste segregation standards were generally well maintained, medical waste disposal in health care facilities remained a challenge. For many years health care facilities in Kabarole had no incinerators on site and infectious medical waste was disposed of by burning in open pits within the facility premises. This is hazardous to the community, clients, health workers and support staff who are exposed to dangerous fumes and sharp particles. 

The Ministry of Health recommends that in densely populated areas centralised pyrolytic incinerators reaching 850°C and above should preferably be used while dealing with Class 2 infectious (clinical) waste, according to the guidelines on health care waste management, MOH, 2009.

 

Kabarole Chairman Hon Rwabuhinga cuts the ceremonial tape to launch the new incinerator, with (L-R) Cecilia Birungi, DHI; Alexander Kikwaya, Deputy CAO, Jane Mulumba, IRCJuliana Ayesiga, Resident District Commissioner and Brian Kisembo Acting DHO. Photo by David Ndamira/IRC Uganda.

Kabarole Chairman Hon Rwabuhinga cuts the ceremonial tape to launch the new incinerator, with (L-R) Cecilia Birungi, DHI; Alexander Kikwaya, Deputy CAO, Jane Mulumba, IRCJuliana Ayesiga, Resident District Commissioner and Brian Kisembo Acting DHO. Photo by David Ndamira/IRC Uganda

In October 2021, responding to requests and proposals from the District Health Department, IRC supported the construction and installation of a MAK incinerator costing over UGX 100 million at Ruteete Health Centre III (HCIII) complete with a waste shed, ash pit, tools store, a chain link fence and a one-year warranty against defects. This is presently the only incinerator in the district licenced to dispose of medical waste. The incinerator is centrally located with mechanisms to enable accessibility and use by other HCFs in the district. 

The incinerator is a MAK IV Model SS8, constructed and supplied by Technology for Tomorrow Africa (T4T), a reputable company with affiliation to Makerere University College of Engineering, Design, Art and Technology. After installation, T4T trained one operator to ensure proper operations and maintenance of the unit. But plans are under way to retrain the operator, and also train at least two more operators. 

At the ceremony held on Wednesday 27 October 2021 to commission the incinerator at Ruteete HCIII, district leaders appreciated IRC’s support towards improving WASH in the district, in line with the Kabarole District WASH Master Plan. 

Brian Kisembo, the acting District Health Officer emphasised that medical waste is a biohazard which if not managed well, could result in serious health challenges for all users of health facilities including the workers and patients. He thanked IRC for supporting Kabarole District with colour-coded medical wastebins, handwashing facilities, capacity building for health workers on WASH and IPC, and transforming at least five health care facilities into model facilities.

On behalf of the District Health Department, Kisembo pledged to put the incinerator to good use, and ensuring proper operations and maintenance. He requested for more assistance, especially the transportation of waste from the neighbouring health facilities, bin liners and refresher trainings in waste management for all health workers in the facilities. 

The Deputy Chief Administrative Officer Mr. Alexander Kikwaya reiterated the importance of medical waste management as a key component of any health care facilitator. He stressed that an incinerator of such capacity will not only ensure proper waste management for Ruteete HCIII, but for the other nearby health facilities as well. 

The Ruteete HCIII In-Charge, Mr Thomas Mugisa, commended the contractor for keeping his word and completing the installation of the incinerator in time. He committed to working with the District Health Inspector to ensure monitoring of the incinerator and coordinating the work of the incinerator operator. 

Before officially commissioning the incinerator, the District Chairperson, Hon. Richard Rwabuhiinga, thanked IRC for easing the burden of waste management, which he said was a challenge to ensuring health and water for all by 2030. He stressed that the incinerator would ensure friendly health centres and reduce the volume of hazardous medical and biological waste not only at Ruteete HCIII but also in the entire district.

MAK IV Incinerator Operator's Manual Cover Page

Cover of the MAK IV incinerator operator's manual

Closing the commissioning ceremony, the Kabarole Resident District Commissioner Mrs. Ayesiga Juliana Sarah commended IRC for supplementing Government by improving health services in the district and delivering projects that are visible and traceable. She stressed the importance of professionalism and quality service delivery as indicated by IRC, commending the contractor for making necessary adjustments to ensure that the incinerator can withstand earthquakes which the region is prone to and which can compromise sustainability. 

It is intentional to mention names and quote the various speakers at the commissioning ceremony. The enthusiasm of both technical and political leaders of Kabarole District towards achieving universal access to health and WASH in the district is noteworthy and the progress evident. This we believe, points to the commitment the district has in ensuring quality WASH services, and the willingness to be held to account on service delivery.  

As IRC Uganda we are grateful for the relationship with the district and the opportunity to contribute towards the targets of the WASH Master Plan. The incinerator at Ruteete is a valuable response to the need and request from Kabarole District local government to control and manage medical waste, a serious challenge in improving health in the district. I, on behalf of IRC, committed our continued support in sensitisation and optimal use of the incinerator. I urged the district to ensure maintenance and sustainability of the incinerator, using the Operator’s Manual provided by the contractor.

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